Microsoft Exchange Q!

nick@KABTech

Active Member
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Apr 6, 2009
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89
Hi guys,

Okay, here is a question;

Is there a program or registry edit that can be made to have Microsoft Exchange SBS 2003 server check email more frequently than the 15 minute minimum that is allowed?

I know there are alot of 'trial' versions of POP3 connectors for Exchange but obviously, I'd like to find a 'freeware' version or even better, a Linux version (RE: Fetchmail)
 

nick@KABTech

Active Member
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Apr 6, 2009
Messages
89
I've found this on another web site:

The downside is that it only checks the pop accounts every 15 minutes (this is the minimum gap).

Whilst looking for a solution on Exchange 2000 I came across this but cannot verify it works.

www.experts-exchange.com.../Q_21777187.html

Navigate to c:\program files\microsoft small business server\networking\pop3 on the server.
There are two executables:

imbdownl.exe - starts the download process of all mails on the pop server
imbdlvr.exe - starts the mail delivery process from the generic incoming folder to the user's mailboxes

Just create a scheduled task in the Control Panel for these two files. imbdownl.exe every 3 minutes, imbdlvr.exe every 5 minutes for example.
You can deactivate the automatic pop3 download/delivery (every 15 minutes) in the standard dialog then, because you don't need it anymore.

However be careful. I think you'll find that if the scheduled task runs again while it is still downloading a large email from the last time it ran then you can lose mail forever. At least that's what I've read around the place. Like I said, haven't tested it, can't be sure.

Anyone who maybe knows if this works, or if it can cause issues etc... ?!?
 

The_Unbeliever

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
103,196
1. Yes, it will cause issues with your Exchange server - by overloading it with requests.

2. Why do you need to check for messages that often?
 

nick@KABTech

Active Member
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Apr 6, 2009
Messages
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1. Yes, it will cause issues with your Exchange server - by overloading it with requests.

2. Why do you need to check for messages that often?

2 of our big corporate clients do not like having to wait 15 minutes to get their emails, so we have been charged with finding a way of making it say, every 5 minutes ±

15 minutes is a long time to wait (IMO)
 

medicnick83

Paramedic
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Aug 23, 2006
Messages
20,886
isnt that the norm??

If you send ME a e-mail, I get it 30 seconds later and that means I can spend up to 15 minutes to reply... I personally wouldn't want to wait 15 minutes to get a e-mail - that would just suck.

Why not rather switch them to proper SMTP. Get their email spooled by a ISP like Mweb.

Oh yes, Nick@KAB, let's just AVOID your problem and run to MWEB to be a saviour - sure they can sell you a different package all together, let's forget however THOUSANDS the client spent to get the system he already has eh.

:rolleyes: @ Amida
 

ToxicBunny

Oi! Leave me out of this...
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Wait, so a "big" corporate doesn't have its own SMTP setup?..

That sounds like a disaster WAITING to happen.

if they want their mail "instantly" they need to setup SMTP rather than having a POP connector in exchange. This will allow them to also integrate into AD and simplify the process of creating new email addresses..
 

Conradl

Expert Member
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Dec 10, 2008
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I have a client who uses POP. Every single time a PC breaks and they lose email they ask: "Don't we have a backup on our Exchange Server??" I'm like: You DONT HAVE AN EXCHANGE SERVER!!!!

Seriously though, POP is not ideal, now would be a good time to move up a level.
 

nick@KABTech

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Just FYI guys, before you think we are a stupid company or something.

We didn't decide on the Exchange setup, we had them running on a nice Linux setup and they never had problems, they were bought out by another larger company and as things go, 10 companies have been smashed into 1 building and when they moved buildings, we not only had to do their new network, but also set them up on Exchange as per how they do things in JHB (head office)

We do have better ways, but sometimes, we have to do what the client wants.
 

ToxicBunny

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In this case what the client wants is not feasible, so propose a better solution.

Case closed.
 

nick@KABTech

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89
In this case what the client wants is not feasible, so propose a better solution.

Case closed.

Hi all,

We have done this.

In a nut shell...

We have setup another Linux based server that gets the mail every 5 minutes and then pushes it to the Exchange server, problem - Soooooooooooorted :)
 

ToxicBunny

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No... problem not sorted....

All you've done is moved the problem elsewhere.

The only solution would be to get Exchange to natively get the email via SMTP.
 

bekdik

Honorary Master
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12,860
No... problem not sorted....

All you've done is moved the problem elsewhere.

The only solution would be to get Exchange to natively get the email via SMTP.

Unless OP does not have control of the Exchange server.
 

ToxicBunny

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Something just doesn't sound right about this whole setup if you ask me...

Exchange can EASILY handle multiple domains, and its not a train smash to make a single smtp server handle multiple domains...

In this day and age, I do not see why a Corporate would even CONSIDER a POP connector into exchange, and for an IT solutions house to be "selling" this idea as feasible is just as irresponsible.
 

nick@KABTech

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Apr 6, 2009
Messages
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Just remember, the e-mail doesn't get delivered direct to Exchange, it's partof a huge company, so the e-mails go from Me, too say, (cause I can) MWEB, then it gets pulled via POP to Exchange.

Having said that, Some might think it's stupid to post a thread asking but sometimes, it's nice to post an idea, get ideas on how people get around things, I find everyday - you learn - I might think I know better, but there is always a better way of doing things.
 
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ToxicBunny

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There is the RFC compliant way of doing email... which your solution (and yes I'm being blunt) is not even close to. A Huge company should not be dicking around with things like email, they're relied on to do business, they should be setup properly.

and even if its a large company company... There should be hubs and edge servers handling the transfer if the branches are geographically seperate..
 

Asha'man X

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Aug 31, 2006
Messages
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A free is slightly crippled pop3 connector is called E-mail Forwarding System. There is a paid version of it that is far more robust. However, the free version can be scheduled to pull mail in every minute if need be. My old high school uses it to handle hundreds of messages a day, and it tends to work out quite well.

My 2c worth
 
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