MIT develops a transmitter that can beat even the best hackers

Jan

Drifting in the black
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May 24, 2010
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MIT develops a transmitter that can beat even the best hackers

Today, more than 8 billion devices are connected around the world, forming an “internet of things” that includes medical devices, wearables, vehicles, and smart household and city technologies. By 2020, experts estimate that number will rise to more than 20 billion devices, all uploading and sharing data online.

But those devices are vulnerable to hacker attacks that locate, intercept, and overwrite the data, jamming signals and generally wreaking havoc. One method to protect the data is called “frequency hopping,” which sends each data packet, containing thousands of individual bits, on a random, unique radio frequency (RF) channel, so hackers can’t pin down any given packet. Hopping large packets, however, is just slow enough that hackers can still pull off an attack.

Now MIT researchers have developed a novel transmitter that frequency hops each individual 1 or 0 bit of a data packet, every microsecond, which is fast enough to thwart even the quickest hackers.
 

Arthur

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Aug 7, 2003
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It's a perennial fantasy that human malevolence can be thwarted by technology. It can't. The only way to stop this is to make better people. That's not easy and might be asking for the moon. But thinking technos can protect the good from the bad is asking for much more than the moon. It's asking for the impossible.
 

supersunbird

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Oct 1, 2005
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It's a perennial fantasy that human malevolence can be thwarted by technology. It can't. The only way to stop this is to make better people. That's not easy and might be asking for the moon. But thinking technos can protect the good from the bad is asking for much more than the moon. It's asking for the impossible.
Yeah, we shouldn't even bother, right?
 

Arthur

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Yeah, we shouldn't even bother, right?
No. We must take reasonable steps to protect systems from abuse. Of course.

My comment was aimed at this bit of silliness: "which is fast enough to thwart even the quickest hackers".
 
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