Moving from IPv4 to IPv6 - What needs to happen

Jamie McKane

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Moving from IPv4 to IPv6 - What needs to happen

The world is running out of IPv4 addresses - the familiar 32-bit numerical addresses used to represent the identity of every Internet-connected device in the world.

The African Network Information Centre (AFRINIC) is one of the only regional Internet registries that has not completely run out of IPv4 addresses, and it is quickly approaching total depletion.
 

Daruk

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Let me guess, they are recycling "previously owned" addresses lol
 

Rocket-Boy

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Many vendors are not interested in adding IPv6 support for products.
There are simple and cheap solutions to work around that like Nginx but its still a fairly complicated setup.

IPv6 scares a lot of people because of how complex it is, but once you get used to it then its pretty straight forward.
 

portcullis

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IPv6 scares a lot of people because of how complex it is, but once you get used to it then its pretty straight forward.
We've been running native IPv6 for years. Currently more than 60% of our end user traffic is v6.

One in 15 of our new subscribers who receives a pre configured router cancels their service within 48 hours because of IPv6. Although we only sell IPv6 compliant routers, there is still much pushback from end users.

The first time the user goes to his or her command prompt, types in something like "tracert www.google.com" and sees those big numbers, they appear to think there's kind of witchcraft going on, pack the router in it's box and send it back.
 

portcullis

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IPv6 scares a lot of people because of how complex it is, but once you get used to it then its pretty straight forward.
I just want to add this in my personal capacity as an early adopter of IPv6. It was easier for me to learn v6 in 2013 than it was for me to understand v4 subnetting back in 1996.
 

Rocket-Boy

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I just want to add this in my personal capacity as an early adopter of IPv6. It was easier for me to learn v6 in 2013 than it was for me to understand v4 subnetting back in 1996.
I was so used to IPv4 that it took a while to change my way of thinking. But once you click then its not tough at all.
The only downside to IPv6 vs IPv4 is that you need to have good DNS in place, you arent exactly going to be remembering IPv6 addresses like you will with v4!
 

Johnatan56

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Don't see this happening, IPv4 will remain.
It will remain for internal networks, and even there I'm unsure of how long as it's easier just to have everything move to IPv6.

We'll also probably see the internal combustion engine decrease in % of cars over the next decade as batteries are finally starting to hit the point where electric cars can equal the average petrol/diesel cars in price.
 

Thor

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You need a fundamental shift in consumer hardware for this to even be remotely on the table.

Switching to IPv6 internally and in the enterprise environment is a no brainer, but that is not where the issue lies.

In South Africa greater pressure must be placed on MNOs to operate IPv6 only, RAIN 5G runs IPv4 right?
 

ToxicBunny

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You need a fundamental shift in consumer hardware for this to even be remotely on the table.

Switching to IPv6 internally and in the enterprise environment is a no brainer, but that is not where the issue lies.

In South Africa greater pressure must be placed on MNOs to operate IPv6 only, RAIN 5G runs IPv4 right?
Nope you don't really... Most new consumer hardware is ipv6 capable already... And most consumers don't give a rats arse as long as things work.
 

Gordon_R

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Nope you don't really... Most new consumer hardware is ipv6 capable already... And most consumers don't give a rats arse as long as things work.
Fixed-line and mobile broadband are different worlds IMO. Hard to generalise with a statement like that...
 

ToxicBunny

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Fixed-line and mobile broadband are different worlds IMO. Hard to generalise with a statement like that...
From your end user point of view they don't care if it's ipv4 or ipv6.... As long as it works.... Most mobile stacks are v6 capable now as well. By and large the hold back are the operators networks... Not the devices themselves.
 
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