MyBB Motorcycle Owners Thread (2nd gear)

Volksieboi

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Nothing wrong with an RVF if you pick up a legit one...10 years ago.
This!

Those were 90's bikes mos. There was one of each in 400 (CBR, VFR, ZZR, FZR, GSXR). The guy at Killarey had containers full of them.

But there were no "baby sport" bikes during the 2000's. The trend only started again when Kawasaki launched the 250 ninja back in 2010 IIRC.
 

CT_Biker

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I was totally in love with the VFR and RVF 400's and was going to probably buy one about 10 years ago. But my cousin crashed the Vuka and then my mom basically ended the motorcycle argument there and then. :(

Looking at classifieds, i can see that buying one now is really just buying a whole world of problems. And I'm all about reliability and low maintenance costs.

I'm pretty much set on a scooter.
Over and above the daily commute, it also needs to handle me and the wifey for a joyride on the weekends.

Question to the capetownians... anyone familiar with http://www.bikerbasics.co.za/ ? are they any good?
Nothing wrong with an RVF if you pick up a legit one...10 years ago.

Now they are just too damn old and a world of trouble.

Even when I ran my ex’s almost snapped an engine bolt putting on crash protectors.
The part supply has dried up. My motor was held together with helicoils and prayers.

Mounting crash protectors on them is a NO. You actually need to mount them to the frame which is almost impossible because then you try and weld a bolt to them the frame may bend. Using the engine mounts...yeah I had to replace bolts and bushings after trying.

My buddies NS250R is also going to be dry stored after it’s restored, no point in riding it because there are few parts for it
 

CT_Biker

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This!

Those were 90's bikes mos. There was one of each in 400 (CBR, VFR, ZZR, FZR, GSXR). The guy at Killarey had containers full of them.

But there were no "baby sport" bikes during the 2000's. The trend only started again when Kawasaki launched the 250 ninja back in 2010 IIRC.
That guy needed a smack. He was selling grey imports for the price of a 600cc full size.

Happily the days of Sonic Youth and small, highly strung 400cc tax-avoidance bikes are over and I’m thankful for that actually
 

Volksieboi

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Back in Japan's "bubble era" of the late '80s a combination of Japanese license laws and an insatiable demand for technology led to a brief spate of exotic 250cc four-cylinder sportbikes. The Honda CBR250R, Suzuki GSX-R250, Yamaha FZR250R, and Kawasaki ZXR250 were only offered for a few, short years, briefly giving road-going riders the experience of bikes that revved as high as 20,000 rpm. Now Kawasaki is bringing those days back with the newly launched Ninja ZX-25R.
Kawasaki Ninja ZX-25R
Will the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-25R make it to the US? We certainly hope so.Kawasaki
Revealed at the Tokyo Motor Show, the bike is a production model, but at the moment Kawasaki is still reticent when it comes to announcing key performance details. The firm has confirmed that it's powered by a 249cc, DOHC, four-cylinder engine with modern technology including traction control, multiple power modes, and a quickshifter.
249cc DOHC inline-four
A 249cc, DOHC inline-four will power the ZX-25R. Kawasaki has not revealed performance figures yet.Kawasaki
Bearing in mind that the last of the old-generation, four-cylinder ZXR250s, made nearly 30 years ago, squeezed an astounding 45 hp from 249cc, hopes are high that the new model—despite needing to meet tighter emissions laws—will be able to at least match that figure. The provision of more than one power mode means there must be enough peak performance to warrant reducing it in slippery conditions.
The engine is mounted in a tubular steel trellis frame, following the lead of models like Kawasaki’s H2, rather than the aluminum beam chassis of its long-dead predecessor. A Showa SFF-BP fork is fitted at the front, with a single radial-mounted brake caliper. The gull wing swingarm appears to be aluminum, but the bike is clearly not a money-no-object machine despite its exotic engine.
ADVERTISEMENT / ADVERTISE WITH US

underbelly exhaust looks to have a catalytic converter on the ZX-25R
An underbelly exhaust looks to have a catalytic converter on the ZX-25R. Will this quarter-liter sportbike meet US emissions requirements?Kawasaki
We understand the new ZX-25 is to be built at Kawasaki’s plant in Indonesia, and that’s also the bike’s main target market. Whether it will be sold elsewhere depends on two things. One is demand; will riders be prepared to pay four-cylinder money for a bike with 250cc performance? The other is emissions. High revving, small-capacity engines are particularly hard to get past the latest generation of pollution laws, so it will be interesting to find out how Kawasaki has addressed that problem. Since Indonesia’s emissions rules are some years behind those in places like Europe, Japan, and the US, there’s no guarantee the ZX-25 will be able to meet our limits, despite the appearance of a hefty catalytic converter in the belly-mounted exhaust. We certainly hope it will meet the requirements.
 

Volksieboi

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That guy needed a smack. He was selling grey imports for the price of a 600cc full size.

Happily the days of Sonic Youth and small, highly strung 400cc tax-avoidance bikes are over and I’m thankful for that actually
They were selling NC30s for like R25 - R30K IIRC.
 

martin

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I occasionally miss my NC35 (RVF)... until I remember how much trouble it was even back then. Did anyone have to mount a heatsink onto their regulator because the damn thing constantly overheated and then the bike cut out with zero warning? It was tremendous fun in the corners but a pain in the ass when it came to parts (especially OEM) and reliability.
 
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Volksieboi

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I occasionally miss my NC35 (RVF)... until I remember how much trouble it even back then. Did anyone have to mount a heatsink onto their regulator because the damn thing constantly overheated and then the bike cut out with zero warning? It was tremendous fun in the corners but a pain in the ass when it came to parts (especially OEM) and reliability.
The sound that those V4's made was just magical. :love:

wont touch them with a 10 ft pole though
 

SykomantiS

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Can't remember that the VFR we had in the family (my sister's) ever had cut-out/overheating of the regulator. We did have to replace it iirc, but then, we've also had to replace a regulator on a Blackbird, and two different GSX-R's, so that doesn't mean much to me.
 

SauRoNZA

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This!

Those were 90's bikes mos. There was one of each in 400 (CBR, VFR, ZZR, FZR, GSXR). The guy at Killarey had containers full of them.

But there were no "baby sport" bikes during the 2000's. The trend only started again when Kawasaki launched the 250 ninja back in 2010 IIRC.
To be honest the ninja 250 still isn’t a baby sports bike but a commuter in disguise.

The 400’s were serious bikes in a midsize.
 

SauRoNZA

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Can't remember that the VFR we had in the family (my sister's) ever had cut-out/overheating of the regulator. We did have to replace it iirc, but then, we've also had to replace a regulator on a Blackbird, and two different GSX-R's, so that doesn't mean much to me.
Depends how you rode, where and how far.

It only ever affected the bike when super warm and then it wouldn’t start.

Leave it 20min and it would start just fine again.
 

SauRoNZA

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The part supply has dried up. My motor was held together with helicoils and prayers.

Mounting crash protectors on them is a NO. You actually need to mount them to the frame which is almost impossible because then you try and weld a bolt to them the frame may bend. Using the engine mounts...yeah I had to replace bolts and bushings after trying.

My buddies NS250R is also going to be dry stored after it’s restored, no point in riding it because there are few parts for it
Had no issues with the R&G crash protectors once I got the seized bolts loose.

Saved the bike during a minor spill.

The throttle jamming wide open at 160km/h was a whole different ball game though.
 

martin

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Can't remember that the VFR we had in the family (my sister's) ever had cut-out/overheating of the regulator. We did have to replace it iirc, but then, we've also had to replace a regulator on a Blackbird, and two different GSX-R's, so that doesn't mean much to me.
A lot of them had the regulator issues sorted out by previous owners or the bike shops reselling them. I was not so lucky and the store that sold me mine struggled to identify the issue until I found a post about in a forum.
 

martin

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Depends how you rode, where and how far.

It only ever affected the bike when super warm and then it wouldn’t start.

Leave it 20min and it would start just fine again.
Exactly this. If memory serves the RVFs were also governed to 180 km/h but could be bypassed by bending back a plate in the speedo or something like that.

Wonder if @RVFmal is still around to reminisce? I think his bike was stolen.
 

Volksieboi

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To be honest the ninja 250 still isn’t a baby sports bike but a commuter in disguise.

The 400’s were serious bikes in a midsize.
Yeah was made as a beginner bike

But the 400s came about because of licensing restrictions in japan I believe
 

CT_Biker

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I occasionally miss my NC35 (RVF)... until I remember how much trouble it was even back then. Did anyone have to mount a heatsink onto their regulator because the damn thing constantly overheated and then the bike cut out with zero warning? It was tremendous fun in the corners but a pain in the ass when it came to parts (especially OEM) and reliability.
I relocated mine to the to the right hand side of the bike. The exhaust was very close to the poor thing.

And it is also a common problem.
 

CT_Biker

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Homologation restrictions I think.

Why they are all sports bikes.
The 400cc bikes were mainly made for the JDM market. They had/have strict laws regarding motorcycle ownership.
I believe it was difficult to get a license for a full on sport bike back then, taxes were high and insurance was also an issue.

Built to solve a problem, not homologate a rider class
 

CT_Biker

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Had no issues with the R&G crash protectors once I got the seized bolts loose.

Saved the bike during a minor spill.

The throttle jamming wide open at 160km/h was a whole different ball game though.
Dropped mine, landed on my bobbin which was mounded to the engine mounts. Took me a while to get the engine mount unstuck. Ended up damaging the threads on bolts which needed to be replaced

That sounds like a fun experience. Was that bikes speed limiter still engaged?
 
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