Need help with extending wi-fi coverage across a 3-story house

Bovine

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I am trying to help a friend to distribute his ADSL via wi-fi across his whole house.

The problem though is it is a 3-story house built into a cliff, so has THICK concrete floors.

So the questions is can you set-up 3x Wi-Fi routers and bridge them (not wirelessly) but via LAN(CAT5/RJ45) cables*. So that each floor has a wired in wi-fi router broadcasting to that floor. I hope that makes sense!?

It seems fairly straight forward and doable to me, but on doing a search it seems all the write ups are for bridging via wire, and then the user-devices seem to then only be able to connect the bridge via a cable??

Whereas if they are connected as a repeater (wirelessly again) THEN the user-devices can connect wirelessly. Is that really true and is it constrained like that?

That doesn't seem right and/or I am getting confused!

He has a Netgear dgn2200 N300
http://rolandh31.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/dgn2200-box.jpg


So:
1) is what I am trying to achieve possible?
2) With this router?
3) What should we get for the other 2 access points? (noting he wants the other 2 to be as fast so also 300mbps)
4) How does one do it..?

Any advice or guidance would be much appreciated! :)

Tx

* This is needed as the wi-fi will not get through the concrete flooring well, and there are already wire conduits between the floors in which to pull the cables through.
 

Bryn

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I set up three routers in my house to get wifi everywhere. They're connected with network cables and it all works perfectly. I went with D-Link DSL-2750U routers. Very painless to set up.
 

lsheed_cn

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Easiest -

3 wifi routers.

1 connected to your modem ( call this wifi 1st_floor)
2nd floor router, the WAN port connects to the router on first floor, and is configured for DHCP for WAN ip address. Setup wifi as 2nd_floor
3rd floor router, the WAN port connects to the router on the first floor, and is configured for DHCP for WAN ip address. Setup wifi as 3rd_floor


Note that with that setup devices on second and third floor won't be able to see each other.
If you need all floors to be able to see and connect to network devices, then you'll need to use the switch port on the 2nd and 3rd floor routers, not the wan port, *and* configure the 2nd,3rd floor not to disable DHCP services.

If you're unclear, ask. Personally I find the TP-Link router brand to be pretty good, but I usually flash mine with *wrt of some sort.
 

SauRoNZA

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Ubiquiti Unifi access points.

One on each floor with Ethernet to the router.
 

HvRooyen

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My setup:
In my house (multifloor, large area) I have 4 WiFi Access points using the same SSID and password but different channels. They are all connected by a wired backbone. Wireless handover works seamlessly between access points.
A few tips:
Choose WiFi channels to minimise overlap in case there is any signal leakage from one floor to the other. Running WiFi Analyzer on an android device may help.
If your access points offer DHCP (I'm not sure if they do), turn it off. I run a Raspberry Pi for that (parental control and other reasons), but the easiest is to just leave that job to the ADSL router.
I have 2 Netgear ADSL (DGND 3700 and 4000) routers that do not play well with handover from wireless access points, so the wifi function on the router is turned off. You may just want to keep that in mind if something acts up.
 

ponder

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Whatever you do run 3 ethernet cables to the adsl router. Connect up three wireless access points to said router.
 

HvRooyen

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Answering your questions as asked:
1. yes
2. cant see why not
3. Netgear wireless access points. Other brands may differ just enough to mess around with your network (been there, done that, but refer my post above regarding problems even with an all Netgear network.) YMMV
4. See my post above. Wires from router to APs. You may need a switch or two. One SSID, one Password, identical security settings (e.g. WPA-PSK). Multiple channels (e.g. 1,6,11). No bridging / repeating.
You can do the same with multiple routers rather than access points as described above. Personally I feel it just complicates matters if you dont need to isolate areas in the network from each other.
 
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bdt

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Ditto to the APs (access points) (yes APs, not routers; do do need only one) :cool:, and with the same SSID/network key for seamlessness of the network, and channels 1/6/11 for best channel separation (or 1/4/7/11 when you've got 4 channels broadcasting). Only I don't know that I would settle on 'just' a UniFi (or any other 2.4GHz only band) device. We've finally got ac/dual-band hardware in the market on the WLAN infrastructure side to catch up with the user-side hardware that already has 5GHz capability and it seems to me that you'll be selling yourselves short to not build that in right now.

There are other details you should get right, but start with that one. ;)
 

b@nD

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Dual-Band -- AP ONLY ?

Ditto to the APs (access points) (yes APs, not routers; do do need only one)
We've finally got ac/dual-band hardware in the market on the WLAN infrastructure side
ALL of those TP-Link devices you mention as being Dual-Band are multi-function devices ( Router , Wireless , Switch , Storage etc etc )
Far as I can see TP-Link do NOT supply a dual-band AP ONLY ?

Ubiquiti DO supply a Dual Band , Dual Radio AP



Ubiquiti UAP-AC Access Point Reviewed

You could also have a look here

EnGenius Technologies High-powered Dual-Band N Indoor Access Point/Wireless Distribution System (EAP600)]

It may cost you some "lobola" money though ?

UPDATE :

These are the AUTHORISED SA agents for EnGenius

DISTRIBUTOR South Africa

I do NOT work for either -- but -- SCOOP & MIRO seem to be the leaders in serious kit for Wireless !


MODS -- PLEASE MERGE DUPLICATE POSTS UNDER SAME TITLE
 
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bdt

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ALL of those TP-Link devices you mention as being Dual-Band are multi-function devices ( Router , Wireless , Switch , Storage etc etc )
Far as I can see TP-Link do NOT supply a dual-band AP ONLY ?
;) I'm aware. But I stole a quick moment on my gf's laptop to knock out that reply & my full data is on my laptop; I'll expand on the thought later.
 

InvisibleJim

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I'd suggest these for the wireless access points connected to your router via This PoE switch

These Ubiquiti access points also have free controller software that you can install on a windows or linux PC for managing access via multiple AP's.
 

bdt

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ALL of those TP-Link devices you mention as being Dual-Band are multi-function devices ( Router , Wireless , Switch , Storage etc etc ). Far as I can see TP-Link do NOT supply a dual-band AP ONLY ?
So far the big push for network-side dual-band is in the routers, somehow they don't seem to think that we need more range than a single device can provide; which leaves us having to look for this kind of kit.
Actually the EnGenius shows as being cheaper than the (arguably better-looking) Ubiquiti. Sadly, I haven't seen the UAP-AC show up locally yet so that, regrettably, has to be out for now. Which means, if we look at them, it's the UAP-Pro which thankfully uses 'real'/standard (id est 48Vdc) PoE and not that half-arsed 24V nonsense Ubiquiti and Mikrotik insist on inflicting on us; more on this below.

I'd suggest these for the wireless access points connected to your router via This PoE switch
Regardless of what PoE AP you look at, stay the hell away from that switch, 24V is *not* the standard for 802.3 and instantly hobbles you should you want to put any other brand of PoE-powered kit on the network, both for APs and IP cameras. If anything, go for at least an 802.3af unit, but preferably one capable of 802.3at ...because moar (on the supply-side) is just better! :rolleyes: Also, for the OP: a PoE switch opens the door for you/your mate to IP camera action, with only one cable going out to said devices.

As to expensive AP action, here's the ridiculous and the sublime (ask Dolby what that Ruckus box will set you back) :eek: (the awful (maybe even aweful?) truth)
 
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bdt

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Oh, it seems likely that one could cobble something together based on a 433, R52nM and the bits to have something presentable; I just don't know that I would want to...
 

b@nD

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PoE Switch

Regardless of what PoE AP you look at, stay the hell away from that switch, 24V is *not* the standard for 802.3 and instantly hobbles you should you want to put any other brand of PoE-powered kit on the network, both for APs and IP cameras.
If anything, go for at least an 802.3af unit, but preferably one capable of 802.3at

As to expensive AP action, here's the ridiculous
What do you suggest as a PoE switch then ?

BTW ; Where I work there is a *ridiculous* lying on a shelf -- they have not yet got around to installing it :wtf:
 

bdt

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What do you suggest as a PoE switch then ?
I mostly use (Planet) switches from Scoop or (Edimax) from Miro, to suit the purpose for the job; I'll got for .at if I can but (with long teeth) use .af if I have to. ((somewhat) ;) over-specced/under-stressed systems tend not to fail from being worked near the limit, y'know?). But just stay with standards-compliant and you're solid.

BTW ; Where I work there is a *ridiculous* lying on a shelf -- they have not yet got around to installing it :wtf:
That thing is just fascinating to look at, but can you imagine putting those things up in a swanky house? :wtf: (back there, that is a LEGIT fscking word, dammit!)
 
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Pada

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As to expensive AP action, here's the ridiculous and the sublime (ask Dolby what that Ruckus box will set you back) :eek: (the awful (maybe even aweful?) truth)
Geezzzzz, it costs even more than our already expensive Cisco Aironet 1140 APs

Its a shame that those Ubiquity PoE switches' specs does not say what protocol it supports. They do however mention that the entry level one only supports 24V, where as the 1U units support 24V & 48V.

I'm very impressed with the Ubiquity Nanostation that I'm using, which is always on and I don't ever recall having downtime with it ever - except of course when the Eskom power failed :)

I'm now really contemplating whether I should replace my dad's TP-Link WiFi AP (running DD-WRT) with like an Ubiquity Enterprise AP, because it often just stops routing the WiFi connections - but the PC will still show that it is connected :(
 
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Bryn

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I can't believe how complicated this guy's thread has become. He just wants to improve his wifi coverage. A few routers or a single router and some wifi boosters will get this done in no time.
 

Pada

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Bryan26:
The solution is simple - like many before me has already said:
WiFi AP per floor - connected via LAN cable to the ADSL modem/router

What makes it complicated is the brand & model WiFi AP, because it also determines future compatibility, such as 802.11ac.
 

bdt

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I can't believe how complicated this guy's thread has become. He just wants to improve his wifi coverage. A few routers or a single router and some wifi boosters will get this done in no time.
No, he's already GOT a router; what he needs is APs (at least/one expects) one per floor. But, as you soon (should!) learn, the devil is in the details: even forgoing the dual-band horse I'm riding :D, you get good/...less good APs; you have to choose between locally (where mounted) powered (a VERY bad idea) or centrally, hence PoE. And if going PoE, you get to have to choose the right kit there too.

And I haven't even brought up cable or cable-related things yet (which is a geographically-dependant question so may not apply). :cool:
 

SauRoNZA

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I do believe the Ubiquiti units all ship with their own PoE adaptors so there's no brain work or additional hardware required.
 
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