New FPB ratings fee opens door to Netflix and Hulu in SA

Sonic2k

Executive Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Messages
7,641
The interesting thing is how Netflix turns a blind eye to whole thing. They obviously know that people outside the US are using services like UnoTelly to watch the US version of Netflix instead of the watered-down local version of Netflix and could easily put the technology in place to prevent it, but so far they haven't done a thing to prevent it.
They won't because why do that, lose business?:
 

DJ...

Banned
Joined
Jan 24, 2007
Messages
70,287
There are a few issues here:

1) it is completely vague and there is absolutely no reference material to address qualification, how the fees are priced, what the process is, what the license authorises a license holder to.
2) it feels like an opportunistic tax - there's no two ways about it.
3) how have MultiChoice been able to get online content delivered? How if they could do it, could Netflix and the like not be able to?
4) what exactly does this tax accomplish?

I've shot off an email to fpb to get more details. Will post once I hear back...
 

DJ...

Banned
Joined
Jan 24, 2007
Messages
70,287
I guess it might due to the broadcasting deals US networks have with those countries' own networks. No doubt Monochoice would screw us again in this regard.
That's the big issue. Distribution is becoming easier, but the content is owned by Ster Kinekor, Nu Metro, and MultiChoice. It is nigh on impossible for a new entrant to this market to actually offer anything of real value, as MultiChoice for one enter into anti-competitive agreements of exclusivity with the distributors and license holders of the content.

There are many companies looking to compete. It's just that they cannot, given the current dominance of a few incumbents.

With regards to sport, DSTv run a pure monopoly. There are no two ways about it.
With regards to movies, there is a duopoly with the cinemas and MultiChoice.
With regards to series, DSTv once again effectively runs a monopoly, given the viewing habits of television viewers
With regards to documentaries and lifestyle channels, again DSTv run that market almost exclusively.

And there is nothing that anyone can do about it, because they sign exclusivity deals with the content owners and distributors. It amounts to anti-competitive behaviour, and really should be addressed legally. It is not in the interests of consumers for an incumbent to own content provision across so many sectors of what should be a varied market...
 

JStrike

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 29, 2005
Messages
12,454
The interesting thing is how Netflix turns a blind eye to whole thing. They obviously know that people outside the US are using services like UnoTelly to watch the US version of Netflix instead of the watered-down local version of Netflix and could easily put the technology in place to prevent it, but so far they haven't done a thing to prevent it.
If they didn't care, they wouldn't block on GeoIP. iTunes doesn't, Netflix doesn't have to, but they do.
 

saguran

Expert Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2012
Messages
4,331
All I can say is Netflix ftw. I don't think I would pay for a TV subscription soon.
 

Sinbad

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 5, 2006
Messages
72,422
If they didn't care, they wouldn't block on GeoIP. iTunes doesn't, Netflix doesn't have to, but they do.
I'd think they'd be bound by their contracts with content providers to at least make a cursory effort at geographical blocking.
 
Top