New Suzuki Jimny (Jeep thingies Part II)

FiestaST

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Suzuki Jimny (2018) Launch Review

The smallest pukka off-roader in the world just got a whole lot better, writes Aaron Borrill.

What is it?

We've had to wait 20 years for an all-new Suzuki Jimny to arrive, but it's finally here. With this fine-looking successor to the ever-popular Mk3, Suzuki hopes to attract a whole new demographic altogether thanks (largely) to the newcomer's funky, retro aesthetics that pay homage to the original LJ and SJ Series – not to mention its much-improved cabin space.

It’s available in 2 trim options: GA and GLX, the former of which comes with a 5-speed manual 'box and the latter of which is available with either a clutch pedal or with a 4-speed automatic transmission. While the new model follows very much the same diminutive Kei-car recipe of its forebears, the dimensions have grown marginally (30 mm shorter, 45 mm wider and 20 mm taller) to improve the extent of the vehicle's off-road articulation, as well as overall interior space. The engine, although slightly bigger in capacity than before, has foregone the turbocharged route and remained naturally aspirated – in this case, a 4-cylinder 1.5-litre unit powering all four wheels.

Visual revolution

With version 4.0, it is clear that Suzuki wanted to recreate the legend of the original LJ and SJ and the Japanese firm has done a pretty decent job. The new Jimny's dinky-car-like appearance endows it with a truly charming quality that does little to compromise any of the ruggedness it's become famous for over the years. As such, it gets rounded headlamps with standalone indicators, a clamshell bonnet with side slits and pronounced fenders – all elaborations of features seen on the original LJ model. In fact, look closely enough and you’re bound to see elements of every iteration scattered about – consider the 5-bar grille, for example, it's a subtle, but contemporary, nod to the Mk3 Jimny.

The exterior is, of course, super practical; the squared-off body shell and moulded black bumper cladding are just some of the visual clues that point towards the Suzuki's off-road bent. Depending on which derivative your choose, 15-inch wheels are standard – the only difference is whether they’re steel or alloy (we do prefer the utilitarian look of the steel wheels).

In terms of colours, there are a host of combinations to pick from. The available 2-tone colour schemes include a new high-visibility Kinetic Yellow, Brisk Blue Metallic and Chiffon Ivory Metallic finished off with a complementing gloss-black roof. The single-tone colours are Jungle Green, Bluish Black Pearl, Medium Grey, Silky Silver Metallic and White.

Retrospective cabin

Like the exterior, the cabin has a retro twist to it. The colour palette is predominantly black to minimise distraction for the driver, but several metallic surfaces add a somewhat premium feel. The angular and geometric dashboard layout, while old-school, is said to aid the driver with orientation in heavy off-roading manoeuvres. There’s no soft-touch panelling (that would go against the Jimny’s core ethos!). Instead, the cabin is practical rather than precious with scratch resistant plastic featuring heavily in the composition. These surfaces are claimed to reduce glare and "enhance concentration". Okay, then. The dashboard arrangement references the SJ Series with the speedo and rev counter housed within 2 separate binnacles. Space is much improved over its predecessors and despite the 2-door body layout, ingress/egress is relatively easy owing to the improved sliding range of the front seats (240 mm).

Speaking of the seats, they are 55 mm taller and have wider cushion frames than before (for the sake of improved seating comfort and shock absorption), plus rear legroom has increased by 40 mm, so it’s now far more comfortable for adults to travel in the back of a Jimny. Furthermore, the Suzuki offers 377 litres of luggage space, but that figure's misleading because the load bay can only accommodate 85 litres' worth of cargo when the rear seats are in their upright position – that's barely enough room for a couple of grocery bags.

That said, the squarer geometry of the roofline has freed up additional headroom. Meanwhile, in terms of creature comforts, the GLX comes standard with a 7-inch touchscreen infotainment system with smartphone integration, electric windows and mirrors, climate control, auto LED projector headlamps, remote central locking and cruise control. Other than those mod-cons and the 15-inch alloys, there’s no tangible difference between the GLX and the GA. In fact, I found the GA more appealing and more hearty, especially in manual guise.

1 engine, 2 transmission choices

Suzuki engineers have finally scrapped the 1.3-litre petrol unit that powered the Jimny's predecessor and replaced it with an all-new 1.5-litre K15B powerplant. By virtue of delivering peak outputs of 75 kW and 130 Nm of torque, it’s not the fastest set of wheels around, but the engine is still perky enough to deliver a reasonably fun experience when scooting around town. As a result, it will complete the 0-100 kph sprint in around 13 seconds, before topping out at a middling 145 kph.

While both transmissions supply decent gear ratios, particularly for off-roading adventures, an extra gear in both formats would radically aid fuel economy and reduce some engine-whine at higher revolutions. In terms of fuel efficiency, Suzuki claims the Jimny will register a combined cycle figure of 6.3- and 6.8 L/100 km respectively for the manual and automatic.

What's it like to drive?

While the Jimny is a competent performer on the road, it truly excels in an off-road environment. In terms of the suspension layout, there is a 3-link rigid axle arrangement with coil springs. It’s a fairly compliant set-up and (in most circumstances) it does a fine job of ironing out imperfections and bumps. Its underpinnings have been radically altered with an improved cross-braced ladder frame chassis to increase torsional rigidity. Point the Suzuki's nose towards a trail and it immediately comes alive – even with the standard Dunlop AT20 195/80 R15 tyres. Grip is always in abundance and this comes down to the clever use of the traction control system, as well as the Jimny’s appreciably low kerb weight of 1 090 kg (manual model).

Tested in the forest roads of the Sappi plantations near Sabie, Mpumalanga, the Jimny impressed us with its superb off-road pliancy and impressive grip levels. Shifting between 4x2 and 4x4 High can be done on the fly, while 4x4 Low has to be selected at standstill by way of the low-range transfer case. There’s also a Hill-Descent Control function, which makes negotiating steep descents a relatively easy exercise. Much of the Suzuki's off-road finesse can be attributed to its improved approach (37 degrees), break over (28 degrees), departure angles (49 degrees) and impressive ground clearance (which is 20 mm higher than before). The mechanical 4-wheel-drive arrangement comprises a Brake LSD system that apportions torque away from the wheels with slip to the wheels with grip. This system is assisted by Hill Hold Control, which is a standard feature on both GA and GLX derivatives.

Safer than ever

Safety was a big priority with the new Jimny and some impressive measures have been implemented to ensure passengers are well looked after in the event of a vehicular accident. The new model benefits from improved impact-absorbing zones in the bumpers, wipers, bonnet and hinges, and the fenders (to latter to protect pedestrians). For occupant protection, additional side impact bars and dual front airbags are fitted. There’s a bouquet of active onboard safety systems, which includes such innovations (for the Jimny!) as ABS with emergency brakeforce distribution, ESC, ISOfix child seat anchor points, a high-mounted rear brake light and an emergency pedal release system.

Summary

The all-new Suzuki Jimny has taken all the winning qualities of its predecessors and shoehorned them into a retro-looking, yet contemporary-feeling, package. There's no question that the Jimny 4 is desirable on myriad fronts; the combination of nonconformist styling, a superbly crafted and functional cabin, plus robust (but reasonably modern) engineering is a tribute to every Jimny that's come before it. Add its proficiency off the beaten track and the new Jimny makes an intriguing case for itself. Whether you’re belting along the motorway or threading it through your favourite trail there’s always fun to be had and, while it’s a little rough around the edges as far as refinement is concerned, it’s this no-frills experience that has endeared it to fans all over the world. Does it live up to its forebears? Without a doubt. In fact, this 4th-generation dirt tracker is, in many ways, the most complete Jimny ever produced. We want one.

Pricing and after sales

The GLX model comes standard with a 4-year/60 000km service plan while the GA specification gets a 2-year/30 000 km service plan. All models feature a 5-year/200 000 km technical warranty.

Suzuki Jimny 1.5 4X4 GA Manual R264 900

Suzuki Jimny 1.5 4X4 GLX Automatic R299 900

Suzuki Jimny 1.5 4X4 GLX Manual R319 900

https://www.cars.co.za/motoring_news/suzuki-jimny-2018-launch-review/45773/
 

FiestaST

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Suzuki Jimny 2018 UK review

Should I buy one?

Were you to buy a Jimny with no intention of ever taking it anywhere near a muddy field or rutted farm track, you’re likely to find that whatever thoughts you may have had about its sweet and endearing image will quickly vanish. It just doesn’t work well enough on the road for it to be considered a car that you could easily live with.

On the other hand, to severely penalise the Jimny based solely on the impressions gleaned from driving it on the Tarmac would be really rather unfair. And while that is where circumstance has seen this particular test take place, a proper mud-plugging, rock-climbing off-road review is inbound.

Rest assured, this isn’t the last we’ll see of the little Jimny.

Suzuki Jimny SZ5 1.5

Where Bedfordshire Price £17,000 (est) On sale January 2019 Engine 4 cyls, 1462cc, petrol Power 101bhp at 6000rpm Torque 95lb ft at 4000rpm Gearbox 5-spd manual Kerb weight 1090kg Top speed 90mph 0-62mph 12.0sec (est) Fuel economy 35.8mpg (WLTP) CO2 178g/km Rivals Jeep Wrangler, Land Rover Discovery

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-review/suzuki/jimny/first-drives/suzuki-jimny-2018-uk-review

Jimny 1.jpg Jimny 2.jpg Jimny 3.jpg Jimny 4.jpg Jimny 5.jpg Jimny 6.jpg
 

joshuatree

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There are a few being advertised on AutoTrader .

Looked at the pictures of a Jungle Green GA model - it seems the solid back bench (no split , model specific ) doesn't have any headrests ! That's pathetic !
 
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FiestaST

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There are a few being advertised on AutoTrader .

Looked at the pictures of a Jungle Green GA model - it seems the solid back bench (no split , model specific ) doesn't have any headrests ! That's pathetic !
To be fair the top line has nice things LED Lights & a touchscreen infotainment system with AA & CP.
 

FiestaST

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Suzuki's giant-slaying Jimny driven: Could this be the toughest little 4x4xfar?

It's taken Suzuki 20 years to launch a new generation of its Jimny, and the latest offering is probably the best one yet. Having driven the 4x4 I say that with confidence, even though the outgoing version has been around much longer.

The Jimny is one of the forefathers of off-roading culture, created in 1970: The little 4x4 debuted before the beastly Gelandewagen by Mercedes-Benz, which was only unleashed in 1979.

The Jimny was upgraded in 1972, with a second-generation launched in 1981. The first four-stroke version was brought about in 1984 and it was known as the "Samurai" edition.

When the third-generation made its way to South Africa in 2008, it was already 10 years old in global markets as it was launched in 1998.

Two decades later, we meet the new version with a strong cult following. There are two specification levels (GA and GLX) along with two transmission options: five-speed manual and four-speed automatic.

It also comes with built-in off-road capability called the ALLGRIP PRO mechanical shifting 4x2, 4x4 and 4x4 low range transfer case and the rigid ladder frame chassis. It's also 15% lighter than its predecessor.

According to the automaker, the reason why the Jimny has been this successful for almost five decades is that it is still based on the same design brief since it was launched in 1970: A compact, lightweight, affordable off-road vehicle with true 4x4 capabilities.

The angular design pays direct homage to the original LJ Series (1970 - 1981) and SJ Series (1981 - 1998). Suzuki says the new model has the same upturned front fenders, round headlights and round orange indicators of the LJ Series and the side slits in the clamshell bonnet of the SJ Series.

The fourth-generation Jimny pays homage to the old design with its clamshell bonnet and distinctive upright grille, as well as other design elements such as the thin, angled rear bumper.

This makes the door easy to open and close in the tailgate, as well as playing a role in optimised off-roading. The squarish wheel arches are also not just a design element but also has significance for the job off the beaten track.

In essence, the Jimny was built for off-roading. At the launch we sampled the top-of-the-range GLX auto model. While the car gets you where you need to be on tar roads, that monotonous hum of the four-speed auto transmission in the GLX searching for a fifth gear eventually fades into the distance.

I might not have been too charmed by its driving ability and the lack of confidence I experienced when trying to overtake definitely dampened my enthusiasm on the dark, rain-soaked roads of Mpumalanga during a stormy Wednesday evening.

My tune changed completely the next day as we headed out to through the SAPPI Forest outside Hazyview. The Jimny was born to be driven off-road and it immediately showed off akin to a cute wild creature in its natural habitat.

It's as if the 4x4 had shed its skin and returned home to roam free through rugged terrain.

Of course, the new model comes packed with new features to improve its already excellent capabilities. There's hill hold and descent control, as well as brake LSD traction control. Driving it up steep inclines, and going down steep descents using the hill control, makes child's play of rugged terrain.

It has a remarkable turning circle of 4.9m which makes climbing and turning into sharp bends so easy that even the most novice of drivers will feel as confident as professional off-roaders heading up Sani Pass.

There's no need to do three- or four-point turns to get around a tight corner, as locking your wheel and just going for it will see you up-and-over any obstacle

The Brake LSD comes into play when you might find yourself with two wheels off the ground, then the system will recognise when you need more traction and it will brake the two wheels in the air, and provide traction where needed.

I understand now why the new Jimny comes across as the best thing since sliced bread among 4x4 enthusiasts.

It creeps into your heart without notice but its off-roading feats make you want to go trail-driving and bundu-bashing, even if you have never done it before. It could also make a neat little city car, because gosh darn it, it's absolutely adorable.

It comes in eight funky colours, namely Kinetic Yellow, Brisk Blue Metallic, and Jungle Green. The Chiffon Ivory Metallic with Bluish Black Pearl is also a really good, alternative choice.

The new vehicle is much wider than before by 45mm taking it to 1.6m, 40mm wider in both the front and rear tracks, and thanks to the redesigned front bumper, the length is 50mm shorter taking it to 3.6m.

Suzuki has also replaced the M13A 1.3-litre engine with a new 1.5-litre K15B petrol engine delivering 75kW and 130Nm. According to my older peers in the industry, the new Jimny drives much better than the previous model in terms of performance.

The new engine has a higher compression ratio (10.0:1) and greater thermal efficiency to deliver more power while using less fuel.

The automaker also claims a fuel consumption on a combined cycle rated at 6.3-litres/100km for the manual models and 6.8-litres for the automatic model. The previous generation was rated at 7.2-litres and 7.8-litres respectively.

It has a 210mm ground clearance, along with a 3° approach angle, 2° break-over angle, and a 4° departure angle.

Inside, the Jimny there are scratch resistant materials which also prevent glare on the dashboard, there's an easy-grip handle for the front passenger when the terrain gets too rough, and a completely circular steering wheel for better control during off-road trips.

The seats have been redesigned to give an increase of 55mm room in the rear. The second row of seats in the GLX model folds completely flat and has a hard plastic surface at the back, perfect for pets or camping gear. Luggage space is 377 litres large.

It might be a great car for a little family too but if you're loading kids in the rear, there won't be much room for any luggage.

There are loads of cupholders, and 90mm deep pockets in the front doors perfect for mobile phones, a 7-inch Infra-red Touchscreen, smartphone linkage display audio (radio, USB and SD card slot), dual airbags and ISOFIX fittings.

Another feature which makes the car more modern is the availability of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Pricing starts from R264 900 for the entry-level model which makes the Jimny very competitive in terms of pricing for a proper 4x4.

https://www.wheels24.co.za/OffRoad_...-this-be-the-toughest-little-4x4xfar-20181108
 

FiestaST

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Driven: Suzuki Jimny is still happiest in the wild

If Suzuki Auto South Africa could get its hands on more Jimnys, they’d be in a serious position to gloat. However as things already stand, the Japanese small car specialist can brag about something.

The new Jimny is now officially on sale in SA, but wait for it...the waiting list for one now sits at six months.

That’s right, if you popped into your friendly neighbourhood Suzuki dealer this weekend you’d be told ‘thank you for your interest’, before being asked to put down a deposit for one that could arrive here in May next year.

There’s no doubting that the new (Gen-4) Suzuki Jimny is already a hit then.

But what makes this Jimny better than the one it replaces?

To find out, I travelled to Hazyview last week to test the new Jimny along the Panorama Route roads and the Sappi-owned forests that the area is known for.

It was an exhilarating experience to say the least because as I arrived at the Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport to fetch the entry-level (GA) version of the new ‘Jimzo’ to test, the heavens opened up it began to rain intensely.

It was a relatively short (40km) drive from the airport to my overnight stop, but the route would require dexterous wheelwork due to the rain, fog and what sounded at times like hail stones.

So, let’s unpack what this mighty 4x4 (and its heritage) in a little more detail.

This Jimny replaces its predecessor after a 20-year life cycle. That’s right, the outgoing Jimny was already 10 years old when it was launched here in 2008.

We get two trim levels in South Africa, an entry-level GA model (right) that comes with a five-speed manual gearbox and high-spec GLX model that comes in five-speed manual or four-speed automatic configuration, depending on your preference for a third pedal. So, three models in total.

All models, however, get All Grip Pro, which is a part-time 4x4 system that you can use to select low-range crawler gears to tackle obstacles that Land Rover Defenders, Merc G-Class wagons and Toyota Land Cruisers normally take on.

There’s no pushing of buttons to select 4L (or 4H or 2H) in the latest Jimny because the company has decided to revert back to an ‘old-fashioned’ gear lever type selector that requires bit of manhandling to lock into place.

In terms of its looks, the Jimny proves a hit, because it harks back to the styling cues that made it such a popular vehicle in the first place. Suzuki Auto South Africa’s PR Manager explained that the new Jimny’s angular design pays direct homage to the original LJ Series (1970 - 1981) and SJ Series (1981 - 1998).

Look closely at the older models and you’ll spot the nods.

The new model has the same upturned front fenders, round headlamps and round orange indicators as the LJ Series and the side slits in the clamshell bonnet of the SJ Series.

The upright grille is reminiscent of the previous generation Jimny (1998 - 2018) and the SJ Series.

To distinguish between the GA and GLX models, look for the by GLX’s 15” alloy wheels compared to the steel wheels on the GA model.

The inside of the new Jimny is equally retro-modern, and in the case of the GA model I test drove, it’s quite sparsely equipped. (Window winders come standard, for instance).

The dashboard is designed in three horizontal layers because it is supposed to serve as a visual reference of the horizontal plane when driving off road.

The same flat lines flow into the moulded door panels with partly exposed body-coloured metal sections. Some say the plastic looks cheap, and the bare metal is a good way to save money on the manufacturing end, but in the end it comes down to practicality according to Suzuki. The interior panels were purpose-designed to be easy to clean, robust and fit into the overall angular styling of the new Jimny.

Away from its styling, the USP of the new Jimny is a ladder frame chassis combined with a patented cross member, the Suzuki X-member, between two rigid axles. The X-member consists of two diagonal cross members that further strengthen the chassis to aid in limiting body flex in serious cross-axle off-road environments.

The new Jimny’s rigid axles are connected to the wheels with three links; a lateral rod on each wheel and two leading (on the front) and trailing (on the rear) arms. Suzuki has strengthened the axle housings by 30% and has added a steering damper to the front suspension to limit steering wheel kickback and vibration on really rough terrain, too.

While on the topic of really rough terrain, axle-twisting sections of 4x4 trails needn’t worry a fourth-gen Jimny driver because of a new proprietary brake-controlled Limited-Slip Differential system and electronic stability control.

The ‘Brake LSD’ system varies torque delivery to the wheel with grip if another wheel on the same axle starts spinning. The system has an extra-power mode too, which kicks in below 30km/h in low-range mode for the best possible traction.

Brake LSD is supported by Hill Hold Control and Hill Descent Control, which are standard on all models. Hill Descent Control will maintain a pre-set descent speed of 10km/h in 4WD high range and 5km/h in 4WD low range.

If you go wading often, you’ll be pleased to note that the new Jimny offers a ground clearance of 210mm, which is 20mm more than the previous model. Its wheelbase comes in at 2250mm, its length 3625mm (50mm shorter than before, thanks to a redesigned front bumper), and its width is 1645mm (45mm wider than before).

Front track measures in at 1395mm (a 40mm wider track than before) and rear track measures in at 1405mm (a 40mm wider track than before).

Powering the diminutive 4x4 is a 1.5-litre four-cylinder naturally-aspirated petrol engine that is rated at 75kW of power at 6000rpm and 130Nm of torque at 4000rpm.

Fuel consumption on a combined cycle is a claimed 6.3 litres for the manual models and 6.8 litres for the automatic model, but we averaged more than 10 l/100km due to the off-roading.

When it comes down to specs, all versions of the Suzuki Jimny have air conditioning, power steering and the All Grip Pro 4x4 system with Brake LSD, ESP, Hill Hold Control and Hill Descent Control.

The GLX models get a host of additional features, including climate control, electric windows and mirrors, auto-on LED projector headlamps, remote central locking and cruise control.

The GLX models are also fitted with Suzuki’s Smartphone Linkage Display Audio (SLDA). This double-DIN audio system has a 7” infrared-touch screen with Android Auto, Apple Carplay and MirrorLink integration. The system has a USB connector, SD-card slot and Bluetooth hands-free connectivity. GLXs also come with a sporty and chunky leather-covered steering wheel.

Suzuki claims to have made every effort to ensure the safety of the Jimny’s occupants and of pedestrians, so to this end, the new Jimny has impact-absorbing zones in the front bumper, wipers, cowl, bonnet and hinges, and fenders to protect pedestrians. For occupants, a TECT-rated body, additional side-impact bars and two front airbags come standard. All models also have ISOFIX child seat anchors.

Suzuki offers a wide range of accessories for both city-dwellers and off-road enthusiasts, which include mud flaps, side under-garnish strips, under-garnish for the front bumper, front and rear differential guards, utility and luggage hooks and side body mouldings.

There is also an optional SUZUKI heritage front grille that makes reference to the SJ413 Samurai model and a rigid spare wheel cover for enthusiasts who would like to maximise the car’s retro design theme.

In terms of colours, buyers of the new Suzuki Jimny can choose between three dual-tone and five single-tone colours: Dual-tone colours include Kinetic Yellow, Brisk Blue Metallic and Chiffon Ivory Metallic that come with a gloss black roof.

The single tone colours are Jungle Green, Bluish Black Pearl, Medium Grey, Silky Silver Metallic and White.

The GLX model comes standard with a four year/60 000 km Service Plan and the GA model comes with a two year/30 000 km Service Plan.

All models are also sold with a five year/200 000 km mechanical warranty.

VERDICT

Driving the new Jimny on the road over a couple of days reminded me why it’s one of my favourite off-road cars.

No, seriously, the Jimny might be able to make the daily grind, but I don’t think it’s going to be a good relationship if you don’t go off-roading with it at least two weekends a month.

As a road car, its nowhere near as polished as other crossover vehicles that you could consider in its price range, but then again you can’t find a 4x4 like it for the price.

It’s a no compromise workhorse (sure the GLX has some sprinkles) at heart and that’s why it’s a great buy for adventurous people. The GA is priced at R264 900, the GLX manual costs R299 900, and the GLX automatic costs R319 900.

https://www.iol.co.za/motoring/late...-jimny-is-still-happiest-in-the-wild-17817332

Jimny 1.jpg Jimny 2.jpg Jimny 3.jpg Jimny 4.jpg Jimny 5.jpg Jimny 6.jpg
 

asshat99

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I am the last person to buy a 4x4 - but that yellow is great. This car is so sexy. Well done to Suzuki for breaking free of the mommy mobiles and shopping carts.
 

stroller

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Suzuki's giant-slaying Jimny driven: Could this be the toughest little 4x4xfar?


It has a remarkable turning circle of 4.9m which makes climbing and turning into sharp bends so easy that even the most novice of drivers will feel as confident as professional off-roaders heading up Sani Pass.



https://www.wheels24.co.za/OffRoad_...-this-be-the-toughest-little-4x4xfar-20181108
Do people not read what they write or was she still pissed from the free booze that she was plied with to write charming crap.
Maybe I'm wrong! That turning circle was measured when doing a handbrake turn:cautious:
 

asshat99

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Do people not read what they write or was she still pissed from the free booze that she was plied with to write charming crap.
Maybe I'm wrong! That turning circle was measured when doing a handbrake turn:cautious:
No, that is the turning radius. Obviously. Maybe do your research before accusing people of drinking.
 

stroller

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No, that is the turning radius. Obviously. Maybe do your research before accusing people of drinking.
Then don't refer to it as a turning circle.
Perhaps in her hungover state didn't pick up that she reversed the figures, namely 9.4 meters. (which I have since established is the turning circle.
I didn't accuse anyone of drinking - I asked a question.
 

asshat99

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Then don't refer to it as a turning circle.
Perhaps in her hungover state didn't pick up that she reversed the figures, namely 9.4 meters. (which I have since established is the turning circle.
I didn't accuse anyone of drinking - I asked a question.
Why would one ask that question (a question requires a "?" which you should know - being sober and all) if you did not have 'reason to suspect it'? Context much!

Perhaps in her normal state she assumed that people who cared about turning circles or had ever driven a car or read a car review before would be able to read it in context and it would obviously be radius. Like really obviously.

It is like when someone says "the sky is blue", they obviously don't mean it is blue at night, or while it is raining. Obviously.

But hey, well done getting one over the motoring journalist! It must really make the austist in you feel superior!
 

stroller

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Why would one ask that question (a question requires a "?" which you should know - being sober and all) if you did not have 'reason to suspect it'? Context much!

Perhaps in her normal state she assumed that people who cared about turning circles or had ever driven a car or read a car review before would be able to read it in context and it would obviously be radius. Like really obviously.

It is like when someone says "the sky is blue", they obviously don't mean it is blue at night, or while it is raining. Obviously.

But hey, well done getting one over the motoring journalist! It must really make the austist in you feel superior!
But, But But it isn't the radius. the radius would be 4,7 metres.
 

stroller

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No, the diameter is 9.8. Sober up there.
I'm not good at figures when I'm sober but if the turning circle is 9,4m then the radius must be 4,7m
Janine inadvertently swopped the figures: the turning circle is 9,4m and not 4,9m as she reported.
Perhaps you need a dop.
 

stroller

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Maybe you guys should get a room and let the topic stay on topic?
The discussion of turning circle of a new Suzuki Jimny is very topical when the topic is about the new Suzuki Jimny.

By the way did I tell you that Janine from Wheels24 made an error when she reported that the turning circle of the new Suzuki Jimny is 4,9m while it is actually 9,4m?
 
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