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New water restriction tariffs hit Cape Town: what you need to know

cenredash

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CITY OF CAPE TOWN

13 MARCH 2018

STATEMENT BY THE CITY’S EXECUTIVE DEPUTY MAYOR, ALDERMAN IAN NEILSON



We have reached 511 million litres per day through sheer water-saving determination; through initiatives such as advanced pressure management; the installation of almost 37 500 water management devices at the properties of high water users; our unrelenting communication efforts; and proactively implementing advanced water restrictions and associated tariffs to help change behaviour.
So, if you go by pure emphases here, the reduction in water usage is due to the efforts of
CT Citizens for "sheer water-saving determination"
The (DA) City of Cape Town "advanced pressure management; "
The (DA) City of Cape Town " installation of almost 37 500 water management devices at the properties of high water users";
The (DA) City of Cape Town "our unrelenting communication efforts"; and
The (DA) City of Cape Town "proactively implementing advanced water restrictions and associated tariffs to help change behaviour.

I think that the city is taking way too much credit here. Also, I think all the rainwater tanks (unsubsidised) and groundwater treatment (unsubsidised and possibly subject to future levies) will have a more sustainable water saving effect than this city is willing to give credit for. It won't save all our problems but the citizens are trying to wean themselves off the city supply which means that we will have done more to sustainably avert the water crisis than the city had.
 

Gordon_R

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Quite an insightful overview of the Day Zero media strategy, both positive and negative: https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/art...rgate-in-the-end-what-was-day-zero-all-about/

Now that Day Zero has been pushed back to 2019, it is possible to take a step back, draw breath, and consider Cape Town’s water crisis anew. In particular: what was the Day Zero messaging actually about? What role did Tony Leon’s communications agency play in the end? And what does the City of Cape Town wish it had done differently in trying to get Capetonians to get on board? (Spoiler alert: nothing.)
 

biometrics

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CITY OF CAPE TOWN


15 MARCH 2017


MEDIA RELEASE


City steps up water conservation and demand management measures


The City of Cape Town is continually working to manage water consumption in Cape Town, and these efforts are being intensified due to the current drought. Approvals have now been given for the supply of up to 10 million litres of treated effluent to various businesses from collection points in Cape Town. Already, 75 million litres per day is being supplied through permanent pipeline connections. Read more below:


The City would like to thank those who have taken the time to incorporate the use of treated effluent water in their operations, as this is going a long way towards increasing water security in our city.


Supply of treated effluent and installation of water efficient parts are key elements of the City’s long-standing and internationally recognised Water Conservation and Demand Management Programme.


Treated effluent, or recycled water, is wastewater that has been treated at a wastewater treatment plant and then piped via a separate network of pipes to various consumers. In Cape Town, this water is not used as drinking water but for irrigation and industrial purposes, and for flushing of toilets.


The City is also rolling out supply of treated effluent water for flushing toilets in areas where permanent connections exist. Special mention must be made of efforts under way in Century City, where treated effluent water has been plumbed into various buildings for toilet flushing, including the Canal Walk shopping mall, the conference centre, and various offices. Incorporation of treated effluent water for toilet flushing is also being done at the City’s wastewater treatment facilities.


In addition, retrofitting of Council buildings and Council houses with water saving fittings continues. The typical fittings in retrofits are aerators, water saving taps, water saving showerheads, dual-flush toilet cisterns, and water management devices.


The City has also partnered with the Department of Public Works to reduce consumption at its facilities. Through the installation of water saving fittings, the reduction in water pressure and a programme of leak detection and repair, a combined saving of 9,2 million litres per day has been achieved at its 20 biggest facilities which mostly include defence force bases, police stations and prisons.


‘Management of other large facilities in Cape Town should take note of the significant savings that can be achieved through using treated effluent water and the installation of water-saving systems. Taking charge of water consumption in this way, along with education and awareness programmes, is one of the most important ways larger customers can help prevent a Day Zero scenario. Not only will this assist in increasing water security, but it will also save them money. Treated effluent is supplied at a lower cost than municipal drinking water.


‘The City is continually looking to expand the treated effluent reticulation areas of the city and increase usage of treated effluent water. As such I am calling on all businesses to explore where treated effluent can replace drinking water in their processes,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services; and Energy, Councillor Xanthea Limberg.


Residents who want to apply for a permit to collect treated effluent should please contact the City on treated.effluent@capetown.gov.za


Please see http://www.capetown.gov.za/City-Con...nitation/apply-for-supply-of-treated-effluent for more information.



End


Issued by: Media Office, City of Cape Town


Media enquiries: Councillor Xanthea Limberg, Mayoral Committee Member for Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services; and Energy, City of Cape Town, Tel: 021 400 1299 or Cell: 073 271 2054, Email: Xanthea.limberg@capetown.gov.za (please always copy media.account@capetown.gov.za).
 

Geoff.D

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Just think of it. Two separate pipe systems installed into your property by incompetent plumbers. What happens if when doing a repair after a pipe line leak, they cross the effluent and potable water feeds?

That is it, might as well assume that ALL piped water in CT is no longer potable and we all switch to having to buy water for human consumption in future.....
 
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Gordon_R

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Just think of it. Two separate pipe systems installed into your property by in competent plumbers. what happens if when doing a repair after a pipe line leak, they cross the effluent and potable water feeds?

That is it, might as well assume that ALL piped water in CT is no longer potable and we all switch to having to buy water for human consumption in future.....
It is highly unlikely that teated effluent water will be piped to private households. The examples above refer to business users, who can be expected to employ competent plumbers. Anyway treated effluent won't kill you, if you drink it occasionally...
 

genetic

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Just think of it. Two separate pipe systems installed into your property by incompetent plumbers. What happens if when doing a repair after a pipe line leak, they cross the effluent and potable water feeds?

That is it, might as well assume that ALL piped water in CT is no longer potable and we all switch to having to buy water for human consumption in future.....
:rolleyes:

Sewerage pipes run along water pipes in any case. They are not retrofitting of putting pipes into households, it's for specific businesses.
 

Geoff.D

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I am sure you will agree, mixing up the sewer and the water feed is high on impossible. But two water feeds?
Yes sure at the moment it is for certain businesses ....
 

Suspect99

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CITY OF CAPE TOWN



The City has also partnered with the Department of Public Works to reduce consumption at its facilities. Through the installation of water saving fittings, the reduction in water pressure and a programme of leak detection and repair, a combined saving of 9,2 million litres per day has been achieved at its 20 biggest facilities which mostly include defence force bases, police stations and prisons.
9.2 million litres a day ? From 20 facilities? :wtf: And thats just the saving. how much are they using?
 

biometrics

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CITY OF CAPE TOWN



16 MARCH 2018


MEDIA RELEASE



Testing continues for automated pressure zone roll-outs in Dunoon


In response to the worst drought in the city’s history, the City of Cape Town’s Water and Sanitation Department is expediting the roll-out of pressure management technology to various parts of the water supply network. By creating more automated pressure zones, the City is able to adjust water pressure remotely and work more efficiently. Read more below:


The first planned works in this regard will take place in the Dunoon Zone which is bounded by Malibongwe Drive to the north, Koeberg Road to the west and the N7 to the east. Some 5 250 households will be affected.


The work is scheduled to take place on Monday, 19 February 2018, from 20:00 to 02:00. Other areas will be informed of supply disruptions in due course.



Not only does pressure management generally lower consumption by reducing the rate at which water flows to properties, it also reduces leaks and pipe bursts by better ensuring that pressure remains within levels that the pipework can tolerate, and reduces the rate of loss from leaks and bursts which do occur.


We have identified 25 areas across the city that could benefit from this technology over the next three months, and contractors have been brought in to speed up the programme.


At all times careful consideration will be given to ensure minimal disruption to the water supply in the affected areas.


The City regrets any inconvenience caused; these are part of our efforts to avoid Day Zero.



End



Issued by: Media Office, City of Cape Town


Media enquiries: Farouk Robertson, Communication Officer: Water and Sanitation Management Department, City of Cape Town, Tel: 021 400 9873 or Cell: 084 307 2001.
 

Geoff.D

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IF ONLY. ...... The Council will stop using the term "worst drought in the city's history".

It has many times been shown that this is NOT the worst drought. Why not just say "In response to the current drought"?
 
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