New water restriction tariffs hit Cape Town: what you need to know

signates

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How does your household use 1kl in a day?
Only when the domestic is in and does the weekly washing. Three loads in a 16kg washing machine will do that.

There's also 6 people living on the property.

Edit

My daily average for May was less than 500l. Total for May was 13.29kl. Its easy to see from the usage graphs when the domestic is in.


 
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droidx

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Knew it would come to this.

My total usage from my well point since July 2018 has been 220kl at a municipal cost of R18 245 at the relevant water tariffs and sewerage charges for those months. My system has paid for itself already and now the only fees they getting from me for water is the pipe charge. They need to make up for lost revenue. Also assisted my neighbour last month and he's also no longer using municipal water. He's water bill was on average more than R2 000 per month.
I would argue that they don't need to make up for any revenue.
With the increase in prices in addition to the introduction of a pipe levy, they are making much more.
Up until the removal of the 6kl "free water" I did not pay for water or sewerage.
Now I pay +/- R200 per month.
Then there's also the electricity levy and increase in rates. Many people are still reliant on them.

My neighbour spent a substantial amount on borehole and filtration. While I would love to be off-grid, for the amount I use it makes no sense, payback period is too long.
 

signates

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I would argue that they don't need to make up for any revenue.
With the increase in prices in addition to the introduction of a pipe levy, they are making much more.
Up until the removal of the 6kl "free water" I did not pay for water or sewerage.
Now I pay +/- R200 per month.
Then there's also the electricity levy and increase in rates. Many people are still reliant on them.

My neighbour spent a substantial amount on borehole and filtration. While I would love to be off-grid, for the amount I use it makes no sense, payback period is too long.
For many the payback would take long. Our main reason was not because of the increased water rates but mainly for the convenience. At the height of the restrictions we managed to get our water usage down to 5kl. But there's only so much I could take with showering for 5 minutes in a bucket, collecting waste water in buckets, using it in toilets. We also had health concerns with a 5 year old with very bad eczema and a mould allergy.

My entire setup cost me just under R15k and I would have been prepared to spend 3 times that just for the convenience of not having to go through the water saving stuff.
 

Suspect99

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For many the payback would take long. Our main reason was not because of the increased water rates but mainly for the convenience. At the height of the restrictions we managed to get our water usage down to 5kl. But there's only so much I could take with showering for 5 minutes in a bucket, collecting waste water in buckets, using it in toilets. We also had health concerns with a 5 year old with very bad eczema and a mould allergy.

My entire setup cost me just under R15k and I would have been prepared to spend 3 times that just for the convenience of not having to go through the water saving stuff.
Your'e lucky that you get pure water directly from low below the surface. I get a strong stream of water about 9m down but its , dark brown and smelly. I need to treat it considerably until I can use it at home
 

droidx

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For many the payback would take long. Our main reason was not because of the increased water rates but mainly for the convenience. At the height of the restrictions we managed to get our water usage down to 5kl. But there's only so much I could take with showering for 5 minutes in a bucket, collecting waste water in buckets, using it in toilets. We also had health concerns with a 5 year old with very bad eczema and a mould allergy.

My entire setup cost me just under R15k and I would have been prepared to spend 3 times that just for the convenience of not having to go through the water saving stuff.
At that price I would definitely do it. Screw pay back. I'm doing 5kl now, in the height of the restrictions it was substantially less.

My neighbour needed to drill 50m+ which cost him over R50k. Then the filtration, tanks and pumps.
 

cenredash

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So, I got a call from the City of Cape Town this morning, water department.

Guy said that I am a registered borehole user and asked if I have a borehole or wellpoint. Also said the Council needed to check that I wasn't linking into the municipal supply and that I wasn't using the water into the house.

He said they would need to come inspect and that I would have to complete a questionnaire and it would take about 30 minutes.

Also, what are the consequences? Will I need to have a water meter put in? I've had the wellpoint for a few years but haven't used it much. The reason is that the water isn't that great. Not only salty but also quite brown, so wouldn't use it inside the house anyway. Also, other than lawn, which I'm trying to phase out anyway, I can't use it much in the garden so I would rather shut it down and de-register than pay for a water meter.


Just wondering if anyone else got a visit/ call?
 

SAguy

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Hectic, so what do you do if you want to run your rainwater tanks into the toilet cisterns legally. Probably fit a specialised valve that costs a fortune and is impossible to get a hold of as an ordinary consumer.
 

cenredash

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Hectic, so what do you do if you want to run your rainwater tanks into the toilet cisterns legally. Probably fit a specialised valve that costs a fortune and is impossible to get a hold of as an ordinary consumer.
I guess you'll have to plumb it separately to the municipal supply. Or have a non return valve on the municipal supply if you have both connected.
 

signates

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Hectic, so what do you do if you want to run your rainwater tanks into the toilet cisterns legally. Probably fit a specialised valve that costs a fortune and is impossible to get a hold of as an ordinary consumer.
There needs to be a non return valve and stopcock between your borehole/well point/non municipal water supply to ensure that your system does not feed back into the municipal water. Costs a few hundred rands depending on size and quality.
 

signates

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So, I got a call from the City of Cape Town this morning, water department.

Guy said that I am a registered borehole user and asked if I have a borehole or wellpoint. Also said the Council needed to check that I wasn't linking into the municipal supply and that I wasn't using the water into the house.

He said they would need to come inspect and that I would have to complete a questionnaire and it would take about 30 minutes.

Also, what are the consequences? Will I need to have a water meter put in? I've had the wellpoint for a few years but haven't used it much. The reason is that the water isn't that great. Not only salty but also quite brown, so wouldn't use it inside the house anyway. Also, other than lawn, which I'm trying to phase out anyway, I can't use it much in the garden so I would rather shut it down and de-register than pay for a water meter.


Just wondering if anyone else got a visit/ call?
Haven't received a call.

The bold part does not make sense. There's no legislation preventing you from using borehole, well point out rain water in your house. Obviously you need to ensure that the water is clean enough to be used in the house without negatively affecting the plumbing.
 
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