NMBM fears that day zero has arrived

Paul_S

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I recall when cpt was in the midst of their crisis and people were justifying their using water to service their pools and lawns by saying they were paying for it - they could do what they liked.

My FIL has a massive pool and redirects a number of drain pipes to try and top it up but it's never enough. I know he buys water from a service on a regular basis.

No increase between yesterday and today unfortunately. There was a mathematical error on yesterdays Kouga.

I have a large flat roof and only use a small section of it which makes the pool regularly over flow during the rainy season. The problem is the dry season where I need to add about 10kL per month to keep the pool topped up.
Pool blankets are a waste of money as they only last about 5 to 7 years and are quite pricey for a large pool.

Rainwater storage would be nice but the storage costs are way too expensive. Storing 100kl for the pool and garden would cost R150K+, take up a lot of space and be an eyesore. Underground water storage tanks are at least two to three times the price of tanks above ground and there are hefty installation costs to excavate and put in concrete plinths to prevent them popping out of the ground when empty. One would think that storing water would be a lot cheaper than storing electricity in batteries but that doesn't seem to be the case.

There are lots of good ideas but most of them don't scale very well in practice. :(
 

bwana

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I have a large flat roof and only use a small section of it which makes the pool regularly over flow during the rainy season. The problem is the dry season where I need to add about 10kL per month to keep the pool topped up.
Pool blankets are a waste of money as they only last about 5 to 7 years and are quite pricey for a large pool.

Rainwater storage would be nice but the storage costs are way too expensive. Storing 100kl for the pool and garden would cost R150K+, take up a lot of space and be an eyesore. Underground water storage tanks are at least two to three times the price of tanks above ground and there are hefty installation costs to excavate and put in concrete plinths to prevent them popping out of the ground when empty. One would think that storing water would be a lot cheaper than storing electricity in batteries but that doesn't seem to be the case.

There are lots of good ideas but most of them don't scale very well in practice. :(
The difference is here in PE we're currently experiencing a drought and many don't seem to care.

As far as I'm concerned pool covers should be mandatory here even if they only last 5-7 years and I don't care one little bit if the tanks are ugly or not - they're necessary. We're allocated 50l per day per person.

I've considered doing this. However my house sits below the pool. Although the roof / gutters don't; so it would be tricky to get water to flow into the pool from them.
You could get a small/slimline tank and a small pump?
 

Paul_S

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The difference is here in PE we're currently experiencing a drought and many don't seem to care.

We're allocated 50l per day per person

Wow! That's rough.
A 5 minute shower with a 5 litre/minute low flow head (25 litres).
Two full toilet flushes per day for the brown stuff (20 litres).
5 litres to drink and wash hands.
10 litres left over. :(

And then you drive to a nearby settlement and find a community water tap left running or the local taxi rank hosing down their vehicles without a care in the world?
 

Supervan II

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Wow! That's rough.
A 5 minute shower with a 5 litre/minute low flow head (25 litres).
Two full toilet flushes per day for the brown stuff (20 litres).
5 litres to drink and wash hands.
10 litres left over. :(

And then you drive to a nearby settlement and find a community water tap left running or the local taxi rank hosing down their vehicles without a care in the world?
And then there's others, like me, who are totally independent of the municipal water supply - with zero fcuks given by our municipality.
 

bwana

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And then there's others, like me, who are totally independent of the municipal water supply - with zero fcuks given by our municipality.
Just wait - they'll want to install a flow restrictor anyway.

I'm partially independent at the moment. Laundry is 100% tank water and at the moment I'm running off the tanks since there's a bit of rain forecast this week. Normal municipal usage is under 9Kl.

Ironically I'm spending more on RO water than I am for that 9Kl.
 

AchmatK

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And then there's others, like me, who are totally independent of the municipal water supply - with zero fcuks given by our municipality.
Wait till they do what CoCT does and slap on a connection charge so you still end up paying them something even if you use zero water. That's what CoCT did and I'm paying ±R150 for the privilege of having a water connection even though I don't use any of their water.
 

bwana

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Wait till they do what CoCT does and slap on a connection charge so you still end up paying them something even if you use zero water. That's what CoCT did and I'm paying ±R150 for the privilege of having a water connection even though I don't use any of their water.
We already have an "Availability Charge".
 

AchmatK

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We already have an "Availability Charge".
What happens when there's no more water available

In all seriousness, I know how dire the situation is but to the municipality, the loss in revenue, due to low demand or being unable to provide water, is more important to them. This is just a way to ensure they still collect something without delivering anything.
 

Paul_S

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Wait till they do what CoCT does and slap on a connection charge so you still end up paying them something even if you use zero water. That's what CoCT did and I'm paying ±R150 for the privilege of having a water connection even though I don't use any of their water.

Tshwane also introduced a R141.07 "Water Network Access Charge" last year plus a "Sanitation Network Access Charge" R82.64. I expect this to grow at well above inflation for the foreseeable future as a way to gouge more money from the "haves" for the "have nots".
 

Paul_S

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What happens when there's no more water available

In all seriousness, I know how dire the situation is but to the municipality, the loss in revenue, due to low demand or being unable to provide water, is more important to them. This is just a way to ensure they still collect something without delivering anything.

What should happen if they're unable to provide water is to waiver that availability/access charge else they're billing for a service that is not being rendered. It would take a bunch of residents to band together to fight it in court but it should be a solid case.
 

bwana

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What happens when there's no more water available
emoji1787.png
They'll be providing water tanks / tankers in areas with inadequate supply.

In all reality we're unlikely to experience a true "Day Zero" as large parts of the municipality will continue to get water via the Nooitgedacht Scheme which currently supplies the metro with most of its water.
 

ToxicBunny

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Wow! That's rough.
A 5 minute shower with a 5 litre/minute low flow head (25 litres).
Two full toilet flushes per day for the brown stuff (20 litres).
5 litres to drink and wash hands.
10 litres left over. :(

And then you drive to a nearby settlement and find a community water tap left running or the local taxi rank hosing down their vehicles without a care in the world?

This was drilled into us as kids way back in the day when Durban went through a really bad drought

"If its yellow, let it mellow. If its brown flush it down"... oh and bricks in cisterns were pretty much universal back then.
 

bwana

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Last updated: August 03, 2021

DamCapacity (when full)Available (Ml)Available (%)
Kouga125 910 Megalitres5 380 Megalitres4.27 %
Churchill35 240 Megalitres5 057 Megalitres14.35 %
Impofu105 757 Megalitres15 851 Megalitres14.99 %
Groendal11 638 Megalitres2 667 Megalitres22.92 %
Loerie3 026 Megalitres763 Megalitres25.21 %
Combined281 571 Megalitres29 718 Megalitres10.55 %

Last updated: August 04, 2021

DamCapacity (when full)Available (Ml)Available (%)
Kouga125 910 Megalitres5 420 Megalitres4.3 %
Churchill35 240 Megalitres4 950 Megalitres14.05 %
Impofu105 757 Megalitres15 917 Megalitres15.05 %
Groendal11 638 Megalitres2 649 Megalitres22.76 %
Loerie3 026 Megalitres769 Megalitres25.41 %
Combined281 571 Megalitres29 705 Megalitres10.55 %
 

bwana

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Wow! That's rough.
A 5 minute shower with a 5 litre/minute low flow head (25 litres).
Two full toilet flushes per day for the brown stuff (20 litres).
5 litres to drink and wash hands.
10 litres left over. :(

And then you drive to a nearby settlement and find a community water tap left running or the local taxi rank hosing down their vehicles without a care in the world?
Here's what the metro recommends you do with your 50.

IMG_8108.jpg
 

bwana

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Ha! The jokes on them if they think I'm using tap water for drinking. The water from the taps hasn't been palatable for months.
I think I mentioned earlier that my RO bill is higher than my water bill.
 
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