Online Microsoft software rental in South Africa soon

deweyzeph

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Apr 17, 2009
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When you get OpenOffice and Google Docs for free, I can't see why you would bother paying for something you can get absolutely free.
 

rpm

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When you get OpenOffice and Google Docs for free, I can't see why you would bother paying for something you can get absolutely free.
Many companies rely on MS Office, especially when people have only MS skills. This offering from ARC will reduce the barrier of entry and make it easier for companies to reduce their MS costs. Going the Linux/OpenOffice route is an option, but the learning curve can be steep for non-IT employees...
 

Shayd

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May 12, 2009
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Personally I have already ported 3 users over to Ubuntu 10.04 and 2 of them rave about it. These 2 are truly clueless users, once they got used to the GUI they didn't need my help anymore.

Ubuntu truly has come a long way.
 

deweyzeph

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I work with a lot of clients who have given up on paying for Microsoft Office and switched to OpenOffice or Google Apps. No biggy, even the most clueless of users finds it easy to transfer their MS skills over to OpenOffice. Even my mom uses OpenOffice these days without any problems! And this is all OpenOffice for Windows.
 

cbrunsdonza

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Jun 21, 2008
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Many companies rely on MS Office, especially when people have only MS skills. This offering from ARC will reduce the barrier of entry and make it easier for companies to reduce their MS costs. Going the Linux/OpenOffice route is an option, but the learning curve can be steep for non-IT employees...
The learning curve of OpenOffice for most users SME/Home is only in the mind. I've switched more than one user to both OpenOffice and Linux without them realising there was much of a difference.

Then again, the power user is a different thing and then for him/her, they will be the most productive in the product they know the best. I understand that market from benefiting.

I do believe that with online Office, more users will accept Google Docs as a contender.
 

ponder

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I work with a lot of clients who have given up on paying for Microsoft Office and switched to OpenOffice or Google Apps. No biggy, even the most clueless of users finds it easy to transfer their MS skills over to OpenOffice. Even my mom uses OpenOffice these days without any problems! And this is all OpenOffice for Windows.
It's not called OpenOffice any more but LibreOffice ;)

Blame Oracle for that.
 

Fader4

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Jun 22, 2010
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i dont like open offices interface though, needs a serious makeover, rather just pirate ms office on your windows boxes.
 

damian24

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Apr 5, 2005
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i dont like open offices interface though, needs a serious makeover, rather just pirate ms office on your windows boxes.
Agree, for R5400, you could finance a cheap PC with Office and Windows (all DSP) and pay only about R30 or so more for finance charges.

D
 

ramar

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Joined
Jul 24, 2007
Messages
291
Exactly! I really fail to see where the savings come in here. At R5400 per user over a 3 year period versus the up front purchase of Office 2010 Home & Business Retail at about R1800.
Obviously it s a bit closer when comparing to Office Pro or Enterprise, but how many small businesses use that?
Am i missing something here?
 

Eniigma

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Aug 18, 2006
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“An average customer saves 42%. We work out our numbers based on a 36-month period, the typical gap between new versions of Office, and a five-user business will save about R220 000 and a 100 user organization over R2 million,” says Steve Briggs, CEO of ARC Telecoms.
what total bollocks.

Unless those figures include hardware, OS and the top end office products with software assurance and insta upgrade on day of release, I don't see how he gets anywhere near those figures. I did a 50 users open licence with Office 2007; a mix of proffesional and Std, and it came in at way under R100k. Even if I had upgrade to Office 2010 I'd still be in at under R200 on 50 users, unless the office 2010 has more then doubled in price since 2007.
 

cbrunsdonza

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OK, I think too many people are missing the point here. I'm no MS fanboi but I will come to the defense of this product. The real saving is that this is user and not seat licenced.

The advantages for this (and all the other online SAAS products):

1) It makes remote working more reliable. Now a user can work in his office, go to another office (remote/same building) and continue working. Makes life way more productive.

2) Companies only purchase when they need it

3) Theft !!!!! No need to worry about lost software and also your data as these products encourage users to save online. When a company gets its PCs stolen, the biggest problems and financial costs is recovery of data.

4) Immediate upgrades to latest versions and quicker bug fixes. This equals to less downtown and more productivity.

So the real saving is beyond just a basic multiplication sum. And this applies to all similar products.
 

cbrunsdonza

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what total bollocks.

Unless those figures include hardware, OS and the top end office products with software assurance and insta upgrade on day of release, I don't see how he gets anywhere near those figures. I did a 50 users open licence with Office 2007; a mix of proffesional and Std, and it came in at way under R100k. Even if I had upgrade to Office 2010 I'd still be in at under R200 on 50 users, unless the office 2010 has more then doubled in price since 2007.
Very true and even though I'm out of the retail industry, I do believe nothing has changed for volume licences. Then again, the cost per user to maintain a single user on even a scale your talking about, can be way more than the R150 per user for the online.

Also allows sysadmins to reallocate their limited resources elsewhere.
 

sLyd3r

Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2010
Messages
11
OK, I think too many people are missing the point here. I'm no MS fanboi but I will come to the defense of this product. The real saving is that this is user and not seat licenced.

The advantages for this (and all the other online SAAS products):

1) It makes remote working more reliable. Now a user can work in his office, go to another office (remote/same building) and continue working. Makes life way more productive.

2) Companies only purchase when they need it

3) Theft !!!!! No need to worry about lost software and also your data as these products encourage users to save online. When a company gets its PCs stolen, the biggest problems and financial costs is recovery of data.

4) Immediate upgrades to latest versions and quicker bug fixes. This equals to less downtown and more productivity.

So the real saving is beyond just a basic multiplication sum. And this applies to all similar products.

Just really appreciate comments with brain cells behind it. Thanks cbrunsdonza for a clearer perspective on the whole issue.
 

ARCtel

New Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2010
Messages
1
There's a couple of points we'd like to clarify - and to give a tip of the hat to cbrunsdonza.

In terms of the cost and the savings we think the AllenPort solution brings:

* Real-world affordability for the SME is very important, and this generally comes down to cash-flow - AllenPort allows SMEs to take a major capital expenditure and make it into a small regular operational expenditure. Few businesses can pay a few hundred grand in licence fees, so they'd need to finance it. So now you have to factor in interest and finance charges on your software, which really is money wasted.

* Now take the AllenPort hybrid-cloud benefits -- offsite storage/disaster recovery means a machine crashes or is stolen, you're back up very fast. Less sysadmin time wasted, less user time wasted, no loss of critical information (how do you even put a number on lost productivity?).

* The cost savings come from AllenPort's Total Cost of Ownership report and we are confident that these numbers are correct.
 

deweyzeph

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Apr 17, 2009
Messages
7,576
Total cost of OpenOffice = R0
Total cost of Google Apps Standard Edition = R0

No brainer.
 

Arthur

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Aug 7, 2003
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Total cost of OpenOffice = R0
Total cost of Google Apps Standard Edition = R0

No brainer.
You use Total Cost to mean only the purchase price, but that's not the way it's used in business. For anyone who runs a business there's are a lot more costs to running systems than just buying the stuff. No brainer.
 
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