Opel Teases GT Concept Ahead of Geneva Debut

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
85,979
Vauxhall GT concept could still make production

Vauxhall is continuing to study the GT coupé concept for future production, but its design cues are most likely to first be seen on next year’s all-new Insignia.

The low-slung, rear-drive GT won critical acclaim for its sporty proportions, flowing surface design and unfussy interior, but its rear-drive layout has posed problems for Vauxhall engineers searching for a suitable production platform.

“We’re still looking at it, but for production we have a very busy next few years and making a small coupé a priority will be difficult," said Vauxhall managing director Rory Harvey at the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

According to Vauxhall design chief Mark Adams, the GT’s flowing body and detailing, such as the front grille, are most likely to “inform other production models”.



Vauxhall’s next new model is the Insignia, due to be unveiled at the Geneva show in 2017, and likely to first be revealed late this year.

At Geneva, a source revealed that a production GT could be engineered around the rear-diff and suspension from the all-wheel drive Mokka, but Vauxhall would also have to find a compact rear-drive gearbox to complete the driveline.

Despite these production difficulties, Vauxhall is using the GT as a design demonstrator, and at Goodwood teamed it up with two iconic concepts from the 1960s – the Vauxhall XVR and Opel Experimental.

"The 1960s are my favourite era for car design," said GM design chief Ed Welburn, "and the XVR is special. I’d say that if you showed it to some young design students even now it would create a lot of buzz."

Welburn made his last official public appearance at the Festival of Speed, ahead of retiring on July 1, and fresh from a two-week European tour in his C6 Corvette, specially flown in the from the US to attend Le Mans and Goodwood.

The XVR was designed in 1966 as the first project to come out of Vauxhall’s then-new studio in Luton, under the control of Wayne Cherry. When it opened in 1964, the Luton studio cost the princely sum of £2.25m.



The XVR — short for Xperimental Vauxhall Research — proved too complex for production with its advanced gullwing doors, clamshell bonnet and pop-up headlights.

But its Corvette-inspired front-end design and sporty proportions encouraged Vauxhall to work-up a more practical design, called the GT and based on an FD Victor platform.

Codenamed XP 867, the GT was sketched in a week and a full-sized clay finished by September 1966, a few months after England had won the football World Cup.

To make the link with today’s GT, Vauxhall has created a full-sized clay, twinned with one of the Opel Experimental, a German version of the same theme – a compact two-seat coupé.

"We reverse-engineered the designs from photographs using Alias design models. Then we checked the wire-frame designs over the photos and milled the shapes in clay. We’re within millimetres, we reckon," says Vauxhall design chief Mark Adams.

Ultimately, GM decided to go with an Opel GT, launched in 1968, and the Vauxhall never went into production.

http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/vauxhall-gt-concept-could-still-make-production
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
85,979
https://youtu.be/JgRAj1v6NCs

d7ac03e1b3a5b71161508ea1ad627a79.jpg


b47a1b331368dc0efefb63053b5f17b1.jpg


1cb42712998fce45f95748eb592981a7.jpg


669c50b002f18f291fbbd0fe029d0fe1.jpg


91ba121f2f4c152bb0994632c8c2ac7a.jpg


61767f1e36ccb86640d94007f7fdfa3b.jpg
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
85,979
Vauxhall GT still on the cards

Vauxhall believes it has two more years to make a decision before the design loses its appeal

Vauxhall-Opel continues to plan the production of the rear-wheel-drive GT concept, unveiled at the Geneva motor show in March, and believes it has two more years to make a decision before the design loses its appeal.

Vauxhall-Opel chairman Karl-Thomas Neumann said: “It’s a car we all love and the public love, so we really want to build it. The question is what the right approach is, so we are studying different directions we could follow.”

The two main possibilities are to create a ‘parts bins’ rear-wheel drive platform or to borrow an off-the-shelf platform. A rear drive platform is essential if the GT is to retain the concept’s proportions in production. Neumann said: “The platform is a complication.”

However, Neumann appeared to rule out the chances of parent company General Motors (GM) creating a parts-bin platform.

“You can take parts and pieces, but it’s a matter of cost. If you do a lot of engineering on the platform, then you can’t do it,” he said.

The most likely solution is to team up with a partner to create a new rear drive platform.“Then you need something off the shelf,” Neumann said. GM’s Chinese partner, SAIC, which owns MG, has been cited as a possibility, but Neumann refused to comment.

Neumann is prepared to wait to find a solution rather than push it with GM’s top brass and risk getting the project canned.

http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/vauxhall-gt-still-cards
 

boeriebuffet

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
Messages
750
So this is obviously not going to touch the road looking anything like this, very futuristic...
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
85,979
Opel GT X Experimental Concept

Opel is giving a preview of the exciting future of the brand with a new Brand Concept. Its name: the Opel GT X Experimental - a bold, 4.06-metre, 5-door, all-electric compact SUV with coupé appeal and brimming with innovative ideas. The GT X Experimental embodies Opel's values and vision along with providing a glimpse of what the future holds for Opel models. The company had already announced that it would further sharpen its profile during the presentation of the strategic PACE! plan last November. The GT X Experimental is the first tangible result of this process.

"With our PACE! plan, we have a very clear vision of how we want to create a successful future for Opel. Focus on a strong brand identity defined by our values - German, approachable, exciting - plays an integral role in our return to sustainable success. Our Brand Concept shows how these values will come to life in our products in the future. Our engineering and design teams have put this into effect brilliantly in the Opel GT X Experimental. It gives a clear idea of how we at Opel see the mobility of the future," said Opel CEO Michael Lohscheller.

Passion for democratising technical innovations fuels Opel's pioneering spirit
During the concept phase, Opel started a wide-ranging and intense process of reflection about itself and its values. Opel can look back on 156 years of industrial existence starting with precision mechanics and almost 120 years of automobile engineering fuelled by the constant commitment to make exciting and relevant innovative technologies accessible to all. Throughout its history, the specific "Opel way" can be summarised with these three values: German, approachable and exciting. As for its future, the brand wants to remain anchored in the most modern and positive expression of its German roots: Opel's "New Germanness" takes the best of Germany's traditional values - engineering excellence, a genuine fascination for well-executed machines, an intense focus on functionality, quality and reliability - and enriches them with warmth and open-mindedness. Inspired by Opel's innovative spirit, the new GT X Experimental captures the essence of the company's rich heritage and promises an exciting future. It blends German engineering, precision and quality with visionary innovations to give a preview of what Opel cars will be in the mid-2020s: bold, pure in appearance yet extremely approachable and customer-centric.

https://www.netcarshow.com/opel/2018-gt_x_experimental_concept/

image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
85,979
Say hello to the fresh-faced Opel GT X Experimental concept

Opel has finally taken the wraps off its new GT X Experimental concept, a coupé-styled SUV that the Rüsselsheim-based brand says previews what its cars will look like by the mid-2020s.

The five-door, four-seater, all-electric concept measures 4 063 mm long, with a wheelbase of 2 625 mm, width of 1 830 mm and height of 1 528 mm. Opel says it is built on a “lightweight architecture” and runs on 17-inch wheels.

The electric GT X Experimental delivers its power from a 50 kWh lithium-ion battery with inductive charging.

Opel claims the concept boasts “unobstructed access” thanks to rear-hinged rear doors and the fact that all four doors open to 90 degrees, while the sweeping panoramic windscreen/roof reaches far back to the rear seats.

The interior’s standout feature is an instrument panel encased in a module that mimics the vehicle’s face. A single, wide screen replaces the usual array of displays, buttons and controls. That said, screens on each end of the facia display the side views captured by the small pop-out cameras that replace the exterior mirrors.

“The Opel GT X Experimental embodies the spirit of our core brand values – German, approachable, exciting. It’s an ‘approachable’ concept that people can identify with. It confidently combines a pure and bold design execution with progressive technology that makes life easier. Clearly, this vehicle signals a very exciting future for the brand,” said Opel’s vice president of design, Mark Adams.

http://www.carmag.co.za/news/say-hello-to-the-fresh-faced-opel-gt-x-experimental-concept/
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
85,979
The future of Vauxhall: exclusive drive of the GT X Experimental EV

Our exclusive drive in the GT X Experimental EV concept shows the boldness of Vauxhall’s vision

Vauxhall is rolling ever faster towards a future of exciting and very different products, the standard bearer of which is its brand new GT X Experimental electric concept, in which Autocar has had an exclusive first test drive.

This is no ordinary concept. It clearly shows the fresh face of future Vauxhall and Opel models, created in a new era of quick-acting creativity, kick-started just over a year ago by PSA’s acquisition of the two venerable former General Motors marques.

The GT X features a plethora of new design features that have already been tested in secret on cars of all types and sizes – not just the GT Coupé and GT X Experimental we’ve seen already – to ensure that they can be the basis for the product line-up of a full-line manufacturer.

Small wonder, as our latest meeting with the GT X in a giant aircraft hangar showed, that this multi-million-pound concept is treated by its reverent handlers as if it were made of gossamer and gold. And that it is often accompanied on its travels by the company’s British-born design director, Mark Adams, who explains its significance better than anyone.

“Don’t think of the GT X as a production car,” says Adams. “It’s more important than that. We call it a brand manifesto – a representative of our design vision for the company’s whole portfolio.”

Production proposal or not, the company’s Russelsheim-based designers chose one of today’s most relevant model types for the GT X Experimental, a B-segment SUV, because such models are selling out of their skins all around the world, with no sign of a let-up. This one is just over four metres long, the same size as the current Vauxhall Corsa. It is designed to use a new, all-electric skateboard chassis and features a 50kWh battery that, in production, would give it performance and range similar to that of the latest Nissan Leaf.

As I approach the car to drive it, the ideal nature of the skateboard becomes obvious. Although it’s an SUV, clearly higher than a saloon, it looks petite and shapely, because its front-drive mechanicals are more compact and easier to package than those of a piston-engined car.

The big wheels (featuring big-diameter, yellow-edged hubcaps that make the tyres look like low-profile affairs, even though they’re not) and the generous ground clearance give the car a hint of toughness that is immediately softened by the shapely but structured surfaces above: the sculpted bonnet, the neat and unique Vizor grille/headlights treatment and the muscular haunches. Give Adams a stray minute and he’ll lecture you on the importance of perfect proportions to a car. This GT X has them.

When the clap-hands doors sigh electrically open (revealing that there’s no centre pillars), it’s a bit of a surprise to discover so much room for entry and egress. The sills are low and there’s generous room for legs to swing inwards. The driver’s front bucket seat (already recovered once because so many Opel-Vauxhall staff bums have been using this concept for inspiration) is comfortable and the view takes you back to days when cabins lacked intrusive pillars and clutter, another of Adams’s hobby horses.

The Pure Panel, a giant TFT screen, comes into its own when the computers start to hum and giant graphics appear. There’s a huge digital speed readout (because avoiding speeding is ever more important today). There is also a huge map, far easier to read than any I’ve seen before, with a clever portrayal of your journey related to a range meter. The clarity is exceptional and everything is touch or voice operated.

The steering wheel boss also has a small TFT screen, as does the centre-mounted rocker switch for selecting Drive.

Driving is a delicious anti-climax. Foot on brake, I rock the centre switch into Drive. With a gentle push on the accelerator, we roll off the mark in near-silence, the promise of electric car precision and refinement instantly obvious. The car gathers way easily. Too easily, actually, for the confines of a hangar. I back off, but there isn't much engine braking. Regenerative braking would (and will) fix that.

The steering is pretty wooden and lacks self-centring, but that hardly matters. We know Vauxhall can make cars steer well. What’s fascinating is the amazing freedom afforded by a windscreen that becomes a roof. Also by the thin pillars and the satisfying view of a shapely bonnet.

The car feels very small yet the view is great. The cabin is light and airy like nothing in production. The decor is elegantly simple, and the Pure Panel has a clarity I’d like in the Mercedes S-Class I’m about to drive home. Adams reckons cars of the future will be better than ever – because customers won’t accept less, and even if they did, designers wouldn’t allow it. So the future’s bright, and the GT X is proof.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/concept-cars/future-vauxhall-exclusive-drive-gt-x-experimental-ev

Opel 1.jpg Opel 2.jpg Opel 3.jpg Opel 4.jpg Opel 5.jpg
 
Top