Psychology of those who have abandoned gods

Lycanthrope

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Imagine that you are brought up to believe. It is irrelevant what you've been brought up to believe, the damage will already have been done.

"Damage." You often hear about how certain experiences can "damage" you on a psychological level. I've been through a fair bit in life. I think there are a few psychological kinks I may need to work out at some point. None, however, quite so deep as what belief has caused me.

I was once a Christian. I went to a Christian school, I was surrounded by Christians and every morning we'd pray in class, every assembly we'd pray. Every Thursday for one hour there was a Christian grouping thing you were not "required" to go to, but if you didn't, you'd have to go to a class where you'd do homework and not be allowed to chat or anything else. Needless to say, if you went to the Christian grouping thing, annoying though it was, you could still interact with those around you.

I was a Christian until I was about 14-years-old. Then an event occurred in my life resulting in me being outed as gay. The details are unimportant, but it was the first time I came to realise that I hated Christianity, specifically. The word, "Abomination" comes to mind, along with, "evil, satanist, devil's spawn" among others. No matter.

It was where I realised that Christianity was ultimately wrong. I knew myself, I knew I couldn't change who I was and I knew I wasn't evil. That was all I needed to know that Christianity was wrong. I still needed to believe. I had to--the fact that there were gods were obvious, I had just been believing in the wrong one.

I remember one day crying and begging for God to fix everything, to have someone love me the way I wanted to be loved. I received no answer. I begged and prayed to this 'Satan' I kept hearing about, apparently he listens, and answers and fixed things. I received no answer.

I looked Satanism up online one day. I wanted to hate the world. Instead I found something called Wicca. I became devout. It wasn't the hatred that I was seeking, instead it was the promise of love. It became my driving force in life. I believed with every fibre of my being, I served the Mother Goddess, I prayed to her each night, I would see the sun and the moon, the earth, the stars, the grass, the trees and animals and I would feel at one with everything.

I remember one camp we went to which boiled down into a let-Jesus-into-your-life camp. People cried, they felt the Holy Spirit sweep over them. I found myself wondering if everyone had gone mad. Apparently they had. We had one guidance councillor (read: missionary) schedule a night out where we'd just "talk and get to know each other." Some in our class went. We confided our deepest secrets. Some had been raped, others spoke of being a surviving twin and I? I was asked what my beliefs were. I said I was a witch. The expression was priceless. I confided that I was gay, that a guy who started something intimate with me pretended to know nothing, that I became depressed and began cutting myself. They encircled me and prayed Satan away :) We heard at school that the previous night a girl had a demon exorcised from her, that it came out of her in a seizure. I accepted Christ. The missionary cried. I felt... hollow.

Next day at school I was asked to pray. So, to the Christian god I prayed.

It was a week before I felt the need to beg the Mother Goddess for forgiveness for being stupid enough to feel ashamed of my beliefs, for succumbing to peer pressure.

Oh I believed so much. I felt invincible. I felt like everyone else was a sheep, unable to see the truth, but I didn't care, because the truth was known to me, I felt the Goddess' love and that was all that mattered.

I stopped being a Wiccan and instead embraced the philosophy of Paganism eventually.

I had such a sense of self-righteousness. In a school where everyone drank, where everyone smoked pot behind the bushes, where they were screwing each other like maniacs. A school which ended up with 11 girls in matric being pregnant. I was the only one who, to this day, had never touched pot, who never slept around (I've had one relationship where I went "all the way") and I had never smoked, or been drunk.

I was proud of this accomplishment. No matter what anyone said or did, I could hold my head high.

In time though, I embraced rationality. I thought more about things I once had such a strong conviction towards, I actually questioned them. I began to see. My belief in gods faded. I lost my sense of invincibility and that was when the true horrors of what the conditioning of "belief" actually does to a person hit me. I started becoming afraid of life.

My relationship with my ex was tumultuous at best and hostile at worst. I was afraid of something happening to him. I wanted to control his life. I began to suffer anxiety attacks whenever I'd be out in open spaces (agoraphobia) to the point where I would be afraid of swallowing in case I choked. I was afraid of my own mortality. I became ridiculously depressed. I didn't want to do anything. I was afraid of people looking down on me. Stupid, stupid things.

I had to come to terms with reality, I had to recondition my own mind to embrace mortality, to accept that one day I will, actually, die and that there won't be anything, that I don't, in fact, have a soul and that everyone makes mistakes, making a mistake isn't the end of the world.

I still have difficulty sometimes. I still like to hope that gods exist, although as I said before in another thread, to me they are not what people imagine them to be, because ultimately, gods are subjective. I like to hope that some part of our consciousness will live on after we die. I don't believe it, but I hope.

I detest and abhor religion and conservative social conditioning for what I feel many of the mistakes in my life can be attributed to. I would've liked to actually have lived a bit. Ultimately though, I grew up, I've come to terms with many things I was afraid of facing before and I'm able to see how people reason the same way I did, how they make the same mistakes and ultimately, how they con themselves into belief for any reason from fear of what if there really is nothing, from I must believe or else I'll burn in Hell all the way through to I feel love.

I'd like to know what thoughts some of you have to this story, and from others I'd like to know what you went through when you stopped believing and how you dealt with it? I've come to realise that I'm not the only one who had trouble reconditioning himself to reality.
 

copacetic

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I have always imagined belief to be a thread woven deep into the brain of a person, and to remove this thread is always going to be a traumatic and turbulent process.

I thought that I struggled to let go of the seeds of God in my own mind but after reading that, I realize that my own journey was a literal walk in the park in comparison.

My experiences at a Catholic school were positively mild in retrospect. I was in the Catholic school system from preschool, so it all gets fairly ingrained in your consciousness as the years go by, the dogma and the magnificent tales, the guilt and the threat of punishment, the fear of angry nuns and frightening confessional priests.

What I can remember is that I never felt comfortable in that environment but lacked the tools at the time, to make any sort of rational decision about the creeds that were shoved down my throat. There was absolutely no place for dissent of any sort and like most schools it was not situation where actual discussion was allowed, let alone encouraged.

I'd love to be able to give a detailed and fascinating account of how I managed to see through it all and embrace the truth, but the reality is in fact pretty mundane - I would lie awake at night as a youngster (Probably 10/11/12) and ponder on this idea of being in heaven for all eternity (which I believed at the time), and this notion would send me into blinding panic attacks because no matter how I thought about it, it always lead to me going insane at some point in the heavenly exercise. It was my desire to escape this most awful situation that led me to examine other religions and gradually I realized that at best they cannot all be right and most likely, none of them were.

Fast forward to my early twenties and one day, after a tumultuous couple of years, I realized I had stopped praying and that was that. Since then, I have taught myself as much as possible about the world and universe in which I have the luxury of existing and every time I learn something new, it affirms the choice I have made.

No offense to the happy religious folk around here - But if I had stayed a Catholic, this notion of eternity would likely have driven me to madness.

Instead I found what I consider to be the truth - Healthy skepticism and a willingness to embrace reality, even if uncomfortable.

Which is ironic, since our school motto was 'veritas'.

As for your story Mr Lycanthrope - As usual, very well written and honest. I can identify and I sincerely hope it has some sort of emotional impact on the people who would benefit from it the most.

*edit*

I have to admit that I was very much tickled at the reaction you received upon admitting to being a 'gay witch'. Priceless.
 
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copacetic

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Reading it again, I have to say that I sincerely hope that people think long and hard about the process that you went through and the determination it must have taken, in respect to facing the realities of life.

There is an important lesson to be learned there.
 

Balstrome

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doing a bit of derail here, maybe I am not being "open-minded" enough, but I can not see what is wrong with being gay. Even typing this is strange, my thoughts are, can one even say that being gay has some sort of wrongness associated with it. It does not compute, or to put it another way "WTF?"
 

copacetic

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doing a bit of derail here, maybe I am not being "open-minded" enough, but I can not see what is wrong with being gay. Even typing this is strange, my thoughts are, can one even say that being gay has some sort of wrongness associated with it. It does not compute, or to put it another way "WTF?"
Lev. 18:22 said:
"You shall not lie with a male as one lies with a female; it is an abomination."
Rom. 1:26-28 said:
"For this reason God gave them over to degrading passions; for their women exchanged the natural function for that which is unnatural, 27and in the same way also the men abandoned the natural function of the woman and burned in their desire toward one another, men with men committing indecent acts and receiving in their own persons the due penalty of their error. 28And just as they did not see fit to acknowledge God any longer, God gave them over to a depraved mind, to do those things which are not proper."
If the bible says it is so...
 

Lycanthrope

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II have to admit that I was very much tickled at the reaction you received upon admitting to being a 'gay witch'. Priceless.
Oh yeah, I've always been the kind of person where, if I can't go all the way, I'll go 180-degrees in the opposite direction to prove a point. It was surprising that, at the time, cutting off my nose to spite my face resulted in actually finding something that genuinely made me feel happy. It also kept people away from me--the insults ebbed away and was replaced with a kind of fear.

It may sound stupid but the insults I got for being a witch (satan, devil, devil's spawn, satanist) were way better than those I got for just being gay (fudgepacker, fag, faggot, etc). Reason being that attacking my beliefs were fine, they could stand on their own. Attacking me as a person... Well, that was more difficult. I was a very emotionally weak individual. I really did quite love the guy who broke my heart, I had a crush on him for ages. I remember first few days back at school someone said, "What's wrong, didn't he want to bend over for you?" :D That one hurt. Funny thing is that I never wanted to tell anyone about him, I only ever confided that in the people I really trusted and then when there was the whole missionary thing, I felt vindictive.

Anyway, yes, derailment of note here.

Reading it again, I have to say that I sincerely hope that people think long and hard about the process that you went through and the determination it must have taken, in respect to facing the realities of life.

There is an important lesson to be learned there.
I've been thinking about it tonight after I wrote that and I think what hit me the most was that one day I just realised that I no longer believed. After that, I had to adjust to, "What now?" And that was what I found difficult.

What I can remember is that I never felt comfortable in that environment but lacked the tools at the time, to make any sort of rational decision about the creeds that were shoved down my throat. There was absolutely no place for dissent of any sort and like most schools it was not situation where actual discussion was allowed, let alone encouraged.
This is important. I was never given an alternative at school, or in my social environment. There was one girl who was an atheist and, in hind-sight, I admired her. She was interested in a lot of supernatural things, had a bit of a screwed up life, but she was easily a very intellectual person. She made human mistakes, but I blame that on inconsiderate parenting. Ugh, I'm digressing. The thing was, that it was a school where you had peer pressure on all sides--from your friends who insisted on their beliefs being correct, on having to do things a certain way, of "rationalising" the irrational where you just felt you HAD to believe it. When I called myself a witch, I'd twist their beliefs to suit my own agendas. It made sense to me, I needed it to make sense. Sometimes I was so convincing that they bought it too, because it fell into their romanticised beliefs as well.

In the world of belief, people play games with each other's minds and they largely don't even realise they're doing it.

I remember one night at some school event a friend was outside smoking and I was sitting with her. It was windy and stormy and one guy came up to us and spoke to us about what we believe. My friend and I sort of shared the thought that we'd toy with him, claiming to be looking for a third person to fill our coven, we said something eerie, the wind picked up, he looked at us and asked, "Did you do that? You did that!" and he skittered off.

People are gullible, they want to believe in things that are illogical because it's conditioned into them from a young age and reinforced as they mature. There was nothing magical, mystical or supernatural that we did, but we enforced the belief that we did, he bought it, he got scared and left. You start wondering, "Maybe we DID do something magical?" It's fun to believe in things like that. It's fun to have people think you're powerful... No... not powerful. It's nice to have people think you're special :) I think that is always what it boils down to.
 

Balstrome

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I remember one night at some school event a friend was outside smoking and I was sitting with her. It was windy and stormy and one guy came up to us and spoke to us about what we believe. My friend and I sort of shared the thought that we'd toy with him, claiming to be looking for a third person to fill our coven, we said something eerie, the wind picked up, he looked at us and asked, "Did you do that? You did that!" and he skittered off.
lol. And you realise that he also was looking for something special and believed that you two could possibly have what was missing from his world. And then his mind used what was in it to create the scare. Every one is searching I think, definitely at a young age, and your mind will use any thing that it contains to validate or reject concepts that it comes across. So in your mind, new ideas and events get judge good or bad, based on passed knowledge gained, and only if you actively apply critical thinking to the new idea, will you get a reasoned understanding of it. Because I said so, or it's on Twitter, are not good reasons for accepting a new idea, but then we all knew this, right ?
 

Lycanthrope

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lol. And you realise that he also was looking for something special and believed that you two could possibly have what was missing from his world. And then his mind used what was in it to create the scare. Every one is searching I think, definitely at a young age, and your mind will use any thing that it contains to validate or reject concepts that it comes across. So in your mind, new ideas and events get judge good or bad, based on passed knowledge gained, and only if you actively apply critical thinking to the new idea, will you get a reasoned understanding of it. Because I said so, or it's on Twitter, are not good reasons for accepting a new idea, but then we all knew this, right ?
Yarr. Some part of us always wants to believe in the supernatural because it might make eternal life and all such things that little bit more plausible and hey, we all want to believe in magic, however small :p

One thing I learnt about Paganism was that it's just a bunch of people ultimately daring to hope for a little more to life. Much of what I learnt then still sticks with me because of the positive influence it had on my life. Things like realising that everything in life works in a sort of balance, that good cannot exist without evil, that one act that might seem good in the beginning, in the long-term results in a much greater evil. Silly things that, if you're objective, you can kind of see anyway. That, however, is where I learnt it, so it's still sort of special to me in a weird way.

I think that I've come a long way from the days of believing in anything and everything just to make sense of my existence. I appreciate being able to look back and laugh at myself and share stories like this without taking it seriously.

I am adamant though that belief is dangerous.

Funny thing about non-belief is that you begin to appreciate the lives of others as much as you appreciate your own because you know how frail your tether to existence actually is. However, more than that, you also appreciate the importance of birth-control and see past superstitious tradition, cultures, rituals and practises and you come to realise that humanity is something to be appreciated (by this I mean your freedoms to explore, make mistakes and to learn, experience and reason).
 

nakedpeanut

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WOW. So detailed! I could at time feel the turmoil you were conveying! It was a very enlightening read to both Lycanthrope and Copacetic.
I've always been interested and intrigued by people's processes and thoughts on religious matters. Not just what they believe but how they go about believing it, and the rational behind it!

I've never been through such a tough time on things of this nature. I'm more of the self arguing person. I can get caught up in conversations with my self, or follow thought trails for literally hours at time. Feels almost like I blank out and wake up with the conclusion. This particular trait has lead me to where I am today.

Background:
I attended Christian schools and church, read the bible and prayed throughout my primary years... This kind of dwindled off as we stopped attending church, and I don't know what changed. Just felt like the family grew apart. We started doing our own things and religion was not such a big part of our lives any more.

I would then go through episodes of "re-enlightenment" if you can call it that. Where I'd be draw back to read the bible and pray.. Then wonder off again in my mind. Trying to put Science and Religion together. I'd come to some conclusion then repeat the cycle when I discovered something new from either side. I'm still adamant that it is possible I continue to pray and believe that if you can build a relationship with God and maintain it even though it is bumpy at times you are centred as a person.

I know when I tell people the things I believe, most think I am very confused as often I don't properly articulate my beliefs adequately enough. Since it would take ages to explain my reasoning. So here are a few points:
Believe in God - Yes, pray for guidance and forgiveness for I do sin! (Look at 10 commandments)

Follow the bible - Almost. It's story book. Interpret it as best you can. For it was the hand of man the wrote and complied it. Your own experience of events would be different from theirs if you were to write it. But they are stories and lessons people can learn form.

Follow the 10 commandments - Yes they are essential for one to live both Ethically Happily, but by breaking them, many people are able to survive in this world! And from that enabling other people to survive. Think cops and robbers. You need both good and bad for things to be in balance.

Afterlife - Yes it exists, but not the way in which people portray it. If you evil and go to hell, as I'm sure you'll enjoy it, since it will be your kind of crowd. If you Good, then off to Heaven since you'd fit in better there. Thus hell would be a torment for good people and heaven a torment for evil people.

Creation of it all - No matter how people try pull Genesis and the Big Bang (or which ever provable scientific theory) apart from each other. They are one in the same. For I believe the universe has rules, whether they be chemical, physical, molecular etc, All things abide by these rules which God has created, and we are discovering and slowing putting the pieces together. If we were and I believe we were created in his image, I'm sure we must have some of Gods intellectual capacity (if that makes sense?).


I know some are weird, and maybe seem miss guided to others... But it's always like that with people looking in. For I have never experience the stepping out the closet or rejection associated with it, for I am straight, I can not sympathise with you. Although logically I am able to infer what it would possibly feel like. If people have never experience what you have, they are not able to judge you, nor are they able to associate with you (guidance councillor in your example).

If people don't question they don't find out answers and potentially learn! I still puzzles me how close minded some people are in this day and age!!

Sorry for the rambling, I had so many more things to write down i got lost in thought and forgot them :D hahaha

EDIT: K just thought of the reason why I relied to the thread! For I have not abandoned God, but I have abandoned the ways in which Christians or other religions constantly shovel their beliefs and ideals onto people. Yet they are often hypocrites and don't follow the ideals they preach. This is often what I have witnessed, and forced me to find my path of beliefs that satisfy my inquisitive nature...
 
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porchrat

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Wow. Interesting. Thanks for sharing Lycanthrope (starting to feel a little like I'm in an AA meeting :p). So expressive. Well written.

My own story is not nearly so intense.

From a very young age I was taken to service every Sunday. At first to Sunday school then eventually I graduated to big-person church! Yay me!

I continued to uncomfortably accept it all. Never really stopping to think too much about it. A lot of the time forcing myself not to think about it.

Eventually my knowledge grew and I could no longer remain ignorant of the flaws in the religion. I secretly abandoned church. My immediate family had no problem with me not wanting to go to services.

After abandoning Catholicism I clung to monotheism. Attempting to tell myself that there was some sort of entity out there looking out for me. If I lived a good life it would take me away to a wonderful place where I could live in happiness forever. Towards the end of highschool I abandoned that idea too and instead chose to regard gods as things that I am never going to be sure about and so logically I should default to not believing.

This is pretty much where I am now. I see no reason to believe yet.

The hardest part of it was throughout all of this and to this day while I have told my immediate family about abandoning Catholicism I have never told them about my disbelief (with my immediate family you can believe whatever you want provided you believe in a Christian god and in my extended family you can believe whatever you want provided it is Catholicism). My extended family don't even know about my abandoning of the church let alone my disbelief. They are very Catholic and would spend the rest of their lives trying to get me back into the fold. My grandparents especially would never accept it. I would constantly be reminded of how I will burn unless I repent and stop my sinning ways. I have even had to pretend I don't sleep with whoever I'm dating at the time.

Out of all of it the deception has been the hardest part for me and still is. They are in the twilight of their lives and soon will be gone. I don't need the stress and strain that it will place on our relationship so I hide it. I would prefer to be able to be honest with them but it would cause more problems than it solves.

To this day I recall a time when my grandmother took me aside during a family holiday get-together thing and asked me if my choice of a scientific discipline causes me to question my faith and I had to look her in the eye and say "no, it doesn't, in fact learning of the complexities of world around me does nothing but strengthen my belief in god" (I am a pretty awesome liar if I do say so myself).
 
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copacetic

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Bloody religion, turning perfectly decent people into stinking liars. :mad:

I am so glad I was never forced to do that.



This is the best thread ever.
 

porchrat

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Bloody religion, turning perfectly decent people into stinking liars. :mad:

I am so glad I was never forced to do that.



This is the best thread ever.
It was a bit difficult putting it all down. I'm not the sort of person that gives my feelings or my mindset a lot of thought. I just sort of... do things. Had to actually sit down and consider my past. I don't really think I've ever done that. Probably the most emotionally dead being in the universe.

It was an interesting exercise and made me realise some stuff. Thanks for the opportunity Lycanthrope.

Oh I forgot to add that I couldn't tell a large portion of my friends and teachers about it in highschool because...after all... Catholic school! Woohoo! We were punished for even the slightest hint of blasphemy or speaking ill of the Lord.

Actually one of my friends had the surname "Lord" and was punished by one of the brothers for using the Lord's name in vain on his spacecase. Insane.
 
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copacetic

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It was a bit difficult putting it all down. I'm not the sort of person that gives my feelings or my mindset a lot of thought. I just sort of... do things. Had to actually sit down and consider my past. I don't really think I've ever done that. Probably the most emotionally dead being in the universe.

It was an interesting exercise and made me realise some stuff. Thanks for the opportunity Lycanthrope.

Oh I forgot to add that I couldn't tell my friends or teachers about it in highschool because...after all... Catholic school! Woohoo! We were punished for even the slightest hint of blasphemy or speaking ill of the Lord.

Actually one of my friends had the surname "Lord" and was punished by one of the brothers for using the Lord's name in vain on his spacecase. Insane.
That is one of the most absurd things I have ever heard. Nuts.

I was just jesting about the lying thing, of course.

I was genuinely very lucky that I always had the freedom to speak my mind, I can only imagine the difficulties in having to keep such a large part of your life from people that you care about.

Thank you very much for sharing with us - Only good can come of this.

:)

(bloody Catholic schools :mad:)
 

Lycanthrope

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Damnit. I have 1920x1200 resolution and I feel this horrible nagging sensation that I need MORE SPACE. I want to read what you've written while I reply to you. And yes, I COULD probably open another window next to this one, but I... actually... that's not a bad idea. Actually, wait, mass expansion of the quick reply box works adequately as well :D

WOW. So detailed! I could at time feel the turmoil you were conveying! It was a very enlightening read to both Lycanthrope and Copacetic.
I've always been interested and intrigued by people's processes and thoughts on religious matters. Not just what they believe but how they go about believing it, and the rational behind it!
That is, in part, why I thought of writing it. It would give people a chance to see how I "matured" (if you could call it that) into an agnostic theist (i.e. don't believe, but I like to choose to hope for gods of a sort and a kind of afterlife--I suppose I'm still confused on this issue myself) as well as possibly spot the pattern of lying and conning yourself into believing for yourself what other people claim you should feel/experience.

Follow the bible - Almost. It's story book. Interpret it as best you can. For it was the hand of man the wrote and complied it. Your own experience of events would be different from theirs if you were to write it. But they are stories and lessons people can learn form.
Well said :)

Follow the 10 commandments - Yes they are essential for one to live both Ethically Happily, but by breaking them, many people are able to survive in this world! And from that enabling other people to survive. Think cops and robbers. You need both good and bad for things to be in balance.
I wonder if giving my opinion on this would result in the derailment of my own thread? I hope not, but while I agree, in part that they are essential for one to live both ethically and happily as a Christian, I don't believe that they are in any way essential for one to live both ethically and happy as a human being. In fact, I think many of them are impractical and irrational in today's society whereas others are a given.

Afterlife - Yes it exists, but not the way in which people portray it. If you evil and go to hell, as I'm sure you'll enjoy it, since it will be your kind of crowd. If you Good, then off to Heaven since you'd fit in better there. Thus hell would be a torment for good people and heaven a torment for evil people.
I really like your idea of Hell :D Granted I suspect the flaw begins in the part where if I had to choose between the freedoms of Hell toward the confines and securities of Heaven, I'd settle for Hell, Hell wouldn't be ideal if I'm racked up there with the murderers, rapists, etc would it? :p Unless you're an advocate of the nine-level Hell, then chances are good I'll either be in the eighth level or purgatory.


I know some are weird, and maybe seem miss guided to others... But it's always like that with people looking in. For I have never experience the stepping out the closet or rejection associated with it, for I am straight, I can not sympathise with you. Although logically I am able to infer what it would possibly feel like. If people have never experience what you have, they are not able to judge you, nor are they able to associate with you (guidance councillor in your example).
Oh don't worry about the rejection and whatever else. To me, it was just the first thing that caused me to realise that something isn't all that peachy with that particular belief.

If people don't question they don't find out answers and potentially learn! I still puzzles me how close minded some people are in this day and age!!
Yep. I believe that certain beliefs can live in harmony with, for wont of a better word, reality, whereas others are simply used as tools and scapegoats for people with personal agendas to hide behind. I suspect others still prefer to have their beliefs (what other people tell them to believe, even) and what to do, how to react, what is right/wrong dictated to them instead of just listening to their humanity first and foremost.

Sorry for the rambling, I had so many more things to write down i got lost in thought and forgot them :D hahaha
Not at all, I enjoyed the read. I'm happy my first response from a believer was so positive. Thank you :)
 

porchrat

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That is one of the most absurd things I have ever heard. Nuts.

I was just jesting about the lying thing, of course.

I was genuinely very lucky that I always had the freedom to speak my mind, I can only imagine the difficulties in having to keep such a large part of your life from people that you care about.

Thank you very much for sharing with us - Only good can come of this.

:)

(bloody Catholic schools :mad:)
No worries. I realised the lying thing was a joke :p. Not that late yet.

Catholic school wasn't too bad. Strict discipline, religion classes built into the curriculum, compulsory Mass etc. but you learn to live.

It would be nice for people to understand that abandoning your faith is not easy to do for some. Many people spend their entire lives battling with it.

Thank you for your account as well. Nice to see that it didn't trouble you for too long.
 

copacetic

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No worries. I realised the lying thing was a joke :p. Not that late yet.

Catholic school wasn't too bad. Strict discipline, religion classes built into the curriculum, compulsory Mass etc. but you learn to live.

It would be nice for people to understand that abandoning your faith is not easy to do for some. Many people spend their entire lives battling with it.
Abso-****ing-lutely. I sincerely hope this thread gives some people the insight that it's not a snap decision that leads straight to bacchanalic orgies.

It's a very taxing and complex process for the majority of people who go through it and I personally find it very commendable.

*edit*

I detested Catholic school personally. But then again I detested non-Catholic school as well, so perhaps the problem lies with me. :p
 
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