Q: What profession are you in?

MirageF1

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^^^^

As long as it's not with Weinstein and yours is made of gold who cares..
 

stixx

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Nov 21, 2012
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Working as a business analyst in the investment banking environment in a specialized business and system.

Started messing with computers when I was 5, 'fixed' my first computer at 7 (it was a simple software issue, but a big win when you're 7). Was fantastic at dev in school and university but didn't choose it as a career path. Got a BCom (Informatics: Information Systems) degree with honors, but after working for 8 years I am tired of it. Looking to get into dev again, specifically AI and ML.
 

Daruk

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Jul 18, 2008
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Primary profession: IT
Secondary: International development
Tertiary: Healthcare, agriculture, education, finance

Education: Matric plus some product specific courses over the years.
 

^^vampire^^

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Wow, so i've waiting too long with my kids!! What did you "mess around" on a computer at 4? Like just messing on it, or actually started scratching inside the boxes??
My dad was an electrician etc so he had all manner of gadgets and gizmo's which I used to sit and look at and he would teach me, or as much as you can for a kid that age. I only really started learning how to change the hardware in the pc at about 10+ and started learning Turbo Pascal at about 11 because my older brother did computer science and I learned from him and his textbooks. When I hit high school I started learning HTML and all the related web stuff and then I did computer science from grade 10 to matric. I've always been very computer orientated and was always the one people came to when they had computer related questions etc.

If you want to give your kids a leg up then teach them how a computer itself works and what the limitations of the individual components impose as well as how to troubleshoot and fix issues. I still cringe now when "senior developers" don't know what to do because the "computer won't work". I even worked with a dev last year that didn't know where the cables plug in. Makes me cry because if they can't plug in cables that are basically keyed and colour coded so you can't get it wrong how can you expect them to dev a proper product.
 

dillinger

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Nov 5, 2007
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187
Professor in Fickologie und Lochkunde. Okay jokes aside.

Did N courses at college, electrical. Worked in Angola for 2 years, company did electrical and construction work. Then for over 5 years I worked for a company that did cash registers, used to travel all over the country to service them, did repairs and installations as well. Then I opened my own little ISP, had a 64K digicon line, Novell router. A 486DX40 running Slackware with a 6 port Boca serial card with 6 x USR modems. Was part of LIA group. Then went into the electrical field, worked for a company that manufactured electrical switchgear and started building generator panels, then people asked me to install the panels and fix the Generators, so that is what I have been doing for the last 14 years. Eskom has always been good to me and insuring that I have work at all times
 

Ecko_1

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Jul 6, 2017
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Our team specifically focuses on Credit Risk models which, broadly, come in 3 flavours: Probability of Default (PD), Exposure at Default (EAD) and Loss Given Default (LGD).
PD models attempt to model the likelihood of a customer/client/counterparty defaulting on their obligations to you
EAD models estimate how much they will owe you when they default
LGD models estimate how much of what they owe you you will lose (e.g. you usually lose a lot more on an unsecured loan than on a home loan because of the house as collateral)

Model Validation is a "second line" function in that we provide oversight of the team that actually builds the models. We assess the methodology and data used, what assumptions are made and whether they are reasonable or not, what factors made it into the model and whether they are actually predictive and make sense, we rebuild the model to ensure there were no errors and that all performance metrics are accurately communicated to the committee that needs to approve the models for use. We also perform ongoing performance monitoring on models that are currently in use to ensure that they remain predictive of the risks the bank is facing.

All of this is just a subset of the work that "Quants" do in banks though, there are many other areas that have "Quants" who do different things (e.g. derivative pricing, portfolio modelling, new product development etc.)
Sounds like your team does a lot of the work that feeds into the banks IFRS 9 model.
 

F1ve_Claw

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My dad was an electrician etc so he had all manner of gadgets and gizmo's which I used to sit and look at and he would teach me, or as much as you can for a kid that age. I only really started learning how to change the hardware in the pc at about 10+ and started learning Turbo Pascal at about 11 because my older brother did computer science and I learned from him and his textbooks. When I hit high school I started learning HTML and all the related web stuff and then I did computer science from grade 10 to matric. I've always been very computer orientated and was always the one people came to when they had computer related questions etc.

If you want to give your kids a leg up then teach them how a computer itself works and what the limitations of the individual components impose as well as how to troubleshoot and fix issues. I still cringe now when "senior developers" don't know what to do because the "computer won't work". I even worked with a dev last year that didn't know where the cables plug in. Makes me cry because if they can't plug in cables that are basically keyed and colour coded so you can't get it wrong how can you expect them to dev a proper product.
I currently have a team member who does not know how to troubleshoot the most basic problems. Even something basic like taking the battery out of the laptop requires a call to IT.

He got Sticky Keys beeps because of leaning on the laptop. Was convinced the laptop was broken and needed a new one.
 

hawker

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Sep 22, 2006
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I'm a Railway Engineer. Have an Masters in Engineering. Mostly do track and civils design, finite element modelling and some operations simulations/modelling.
 

Rocket-Boy

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Jul 31, 2007
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Devops/Linux admin.
Various certifications related to that but mostly learning through necessity.
 

Jehosefat

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May 8, 2012
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Sounds like your team does a lot of the work that feeds into the banks IFRS 9 model.
Yup, about 1/3rd of the team is focused on the IFRS9 models with another 1/3rd on IRB/Basel models and the final 1/3rd on Counterpart Credit Risk/Trading book exposure models
 

garyc

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Jun 30, 2010
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Going on 8 years hay..

Its hard to think of studying because being so cash strapped most of the time hay.. This is why i am looking for a new job, hopefully with a nice pay bump, but still searching.. willing to study if asked to.
I have asked to study via the bank but they tend to have a no care attitude.. all about them looking good while we do the work.. its sad.
Got two degrees through after-hours study (MSc and recently PhD) which were company sponsored. I was in the same position where a bursary was almost impossible to come by. On the other hand they needed training credits and it was was relatively easy to get money from the training budget rather than the bursary scheme. This was obviously on a year-by-year (i.e. hand to mouth) basis. It was good for the company since paying the university registration fees was relatively cheap compared to setting up training courses and having people attend during work time.
 

ReeceDBN031

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Aug 28, 2018
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Got two degrees through after-hours study (MSc and recently PhD) which were company sponsored. I was in the same position where a bursary was almost impossible to come by. On the other hand they needed training credits and it was was relatively easy to get money from the training budget rather than the bursary scheme. This was obviously on a year-by-year (i.e. hand to mouth) basis. It was good for the company since paying the university registration fees was relatively cheap compared to setting up training courses and having people attend during work time.
Thats lucky.. But here its all about their time. If it works for them.
They wont even let us have a year end function... so can you imagine i ask them this lol
 

Johnatan56

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Aug 23, 2013
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Thats lucky.. But here its all about their time. If it works for them.
They wont even let us have a year end function... so can you imagine i ask them this lol
That's crazy, it reduces company tax liability for NQF5 bursaries, most of the difficulty of all of this is HR just not wanting to do the work.
 

ReeceDBN031

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Aug 28, 2018
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That's crazy, it reduces company tax liability for NQF5 bursaries, most of the difficulty of all of this is HR just not wanting to do the work.
id really love the oppertunity.. But im not going anywhere here.. and they dont care a damn
 
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