RAM soldered to notebook motherboard - why?

Apogee

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eg2505

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Many modern laptops would be a great way to smuggle contraband - so much empty space in there.
/detain this person next time they fly, and get the rubber gloves ready:whistling:
 
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Cray

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Assume you are looking for an answer other than the obvious one?
 

eg2505

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Just came across this notebook available at Takealot with decent specs for an entry-level system:

https://www.takealot.com/lenovo-ideapad-5-i5-8gb-512gb-ssd-15-6-notebook-grey/PLID72932199

They do make it very clear though that the 8GB RAM module is soldered onto the motherboard, and that it cannot be upgraded.

Anyone care to elaborate why manufacturers would do this? Is it that much cheaper to manufacture them without RAM slots?
you want a laptop? you really want a laptop that beats all others? none of this planned obsolescence garbage were so forced to have?

wish one of our big distributors got stock of these, I would buy one without flinching.
 

SaucePlz

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It's also to ensure future business. Products designed to be 'good enough' today means that in a few years time you will probably want/have to buy a new one in order to keep up with processing requirements.
 

Apogee

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Many modern laptops would be a great way to smuggle contraband - so much empty space in there.
Space is only really a concern with ultraportables, which this is not.

8GB does not really go far these days, and you are basically SOL if you want to run VMs on it, or do things like video-editing.

I read somewhere that this is basically the manufacturers' way of ensuring the products won't be used for too long, before being replaced (planned obsolescence), as well as them preventing the noobs from opening the casings and damaging the parts, which then becomes their problem.
 
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Barbarian Conan

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Just came across this notebook available at Takealot with decent specs for an entry-level system:

https://www.takealot.com/lenovo-ideapad-5-i5-8gb-512gb-ssd-15-6-notebook-grey/PLID72932199

They do make it very clear though that the 8GB RAM module is soldered onto the motherboard, and that it cannot be upgraded.

Anyone care to elaborate why manufacturers would do this? Is it that much cheaper to manufacture them without RAM slots?

Saving space is one reason, which is important for some customers. Or they could just be assholes.

Apple does this on (almost?) all their laptops. I suspect they are assholes.
Dell does this on the XPS 13 2-in-1, which is incredibly thin at 13mm at it's thickest point. They don't do it on their thicker XPS 15 models.
 

das Toktokken

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The real issue with this is you are limiting upgrades further. It's not inconceivable that an upgrade RAM stick will just not play ball with the onboard RAM even if you're matching speeds.
 

Apogee

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Saving space is one reason, which is important for some customers. Or they could just be assholes.

Apple does this on (almost?) all their laptops. I suspect they are assholes.
Dell does this on the XPS 13 2-in-1, which is incredibly thin at 13mm at it's thickest point. They don't do it on their thicker XPS 15 models.
:laugh:

Apparently it was Steve Jobs' obsession with making Apple's products as thin as possible, which started this trend.

The weight of a notebook is more of a concern, although in most cases (see what I did there?) the thinner the notebook, the lighter it is.
 

SauRoNZA

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Thin in many cases, sometimes also reliability as there is some ridiculous statistic somewhere relating to memory dislodging and causing support queries.

But mostly money.
 

InternetSwag

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It is done by design.
I bought a ultrabook recently and there were 2x models.
One with 8gb ram soldered.
One with 16gb ram soldered.

Same spec, same cpu etc. 3200 zar price difference.
If I were to upgrade it myself would cost half that.

There is no reason a high end ultrabook needs to have non upgradeable ram other than to sell a higher tier model for more profit.
 

OCP

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Space is only really a concern with ultraportables, which this is not.

8GB does not really go far these days, and you are basically SOL if you want to run VMs on it, or do things like video-editing.

I read somewhere that this is basically the manufacturers' way of ensuring the products won't be used for too long, before being replaced (planned obsolescence), as well as them preventing the noobs from opening the casings and damaging the parts, which then becomes their problem.
or using Chrome....
 

SaucePlz

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you want a laptop? you really want a laptop that beats all others? none of this planned obsolescence garbage were so forced to have?

wish one of our big distributors got stock of these, I would buy one without flinching.
 

DA-LION-619

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It is done by design.
I bought a ultrabook recently and there were 2x models.
One with 8gb ram soldered.
One with 16gb ram soldered.

Same spec, same cpu etc. 3200 zar price difference.
If I were to upgrade it myself would cost half that.

There is no reason a high end ultrabook needs to have non upgradeable ram other than to sell a higher tier model for more profit.
Then buy a laptop…
 

Johnatan56

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Thin in many cases, sometimes also reliability as there is some ridiculous statistic somewhere relating to memory dislodging and causing support queries.

But mostly money.
Has nothing to do with thinness since battery will always be thick enough that it's not an issue for most modern designs, look at framework, and I would argue that faulty memory is more common than RAM dislodge in a laptop.

Modern wise, the main reasons are because you can solder it closer to the CPU so can have narrower, lower voltage/power, this is for LPDDR4X, if you want to do a "performance" argument but this is quite negligible (you're talking low minutes for like 5 hour battery life) and you can place it in a better thermal spot; and that actual RAM sockets require person to actually insert it which I'd argue is the main reason.

Most modern compromise at the moment is one soldered and one free slot for consumer to add RAM to it.
 

RedViking

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Don't think it has anything to do with saving costs. Dell, Zephyrus, Razor..... They all have soldered ram.

It is so in couple of years you are forced to upgrade to get something with more ram.

Just creates more junk. Same with batteries that are difficult to replace or almost not possible at all. A pathetic trend. Basically means in 24 months you gonna chuck your device away.
 
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