Resign with immediate effect?

Mars

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If a job offer, sale or any business transaction for that matter is "now or never" then its always never. Always. The only exception to the rule is when you are gambling.
 

Whiskers81

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I really despise employees that drop me with this immediate resignation stunts. It's always the other company wants me to start immediately. I just think they don't have the spine to tell the new company that they have a notice period and that is what they have to work. If the new company really wants you that bad, they will never worry about the waiting.

It's easier to be a spineless coward than to honour your commitment to the Company you have been working for.
 

PotatoGuardian

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I really despise employees that drop me with this immediate resignation stunts. It's always the other company wants me to start immediately. I just think they don't have the spine to tell the new company that they have a notice period and that is what they have to work. If the new company really wants you that bad, they will never worry about the waiting.

It's easier to be a spineless coward than to honour your commitment to the Company you have been working for.
out of interest. From an employer perspective, what would be different if someone was in their probation period and worked out a 2 week notice period vs just leaving straight away. You’d have to pay them for their notice period vs saving that money? Is it just a principle thing for you?

not being snarky just genuinely curious
 

Whiskers81

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out of interest. From an employer perspective, what would be different if someone was in their probation period and worked out a 2 week notice period vs just leaving straight away. You’d have to pay them for their notice period vs saving that money? Is it just a principle thing for you?

not being snarky just genuinely curious
It is a principal issue for me to start with.

But when someone leaves straight away it always leaves me scrambling to sort out staffing issues and it ends up in me paying overtime due to changes in my manpower planning. I don't want my staff to work overtime, I want them to rest and be 100% attentive and focused on the customer when they are at work. My staff works hard enough as it is.

They then have to carry the extra burden of someone dropping them. When an employee leaves and resigns with immediate effect they don't really drop me, they are dropping their colleagues.
 

PotatoGuardian

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It is a principal issue for me to start with.

But when someone leaves straight away it always leaves me scrambling to sort out staffing issues and it ends up in me paying overtime due to changes in my manpower planning. I don't want my staff to work overtime, I want them to rest and be 100% attentive and focused on the customer when they are at work. My staff works hard enough as it is.

They then have to carry the extra burden of someone dropping them. When an employee leaves and resigns with immediate effect they don't really drop me, they are dropping their colleagues.
That’s a fair perspective and totally understandable.
 

maumau

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Don't be silly, I'm not suggesting anything underhanded.

Seriously? Drawing 2 salaries at the same time, using one company's resources to work for another one?
Why use their resources? Who said anything about drawing a salary from the new guys?

Nor sure what the job entails but if it's programming don't you guys work in the evening if you want to?

Dude are you being for real? It's theft in my eyes
Yep, being serious. Explain to both companies, stay where you are and help out the new company from home after hours. No need for them to pay but you'd show willing.
 
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Splinter

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I don’t want to give much info but it’s looking likely I’ll get the offer yeah but if I do they need someone to start ASAP. The opportunity is kinda too big to pass up
In other words, you haven't had an offer yet. But you are apparently on a probation period with your new company.


I really despise employees that drop me with this immediate resignation stunts. It's always the other company wants me to start immediately. I just think they don't have the spine to tell the new company that they have a notice period and that is what they have to work. If the new company really wants you that bad, they will never worry about the waiting.

It's easier to be a spineless coward than to honour your commitment to the Company you have been working for.
This is odd. Any company that is recruiting someone should realise they coming from another company.

But, how many employees have dropped you with "immediate resignation"? In today's world, that is bad form, and will come back and haunt the employee. Are you a bad employer?
 

ponder

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I hate that term in contracts, it's ambiguous and often leads to confusion when people resign.
Why? A calendar month is exactly what it says it is, one of the 12 months on a calendar.
 

SAguy

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Why? A calendar month is exactly what it says it is, one of the 12 months on a calendar.
It can also mean a period of 4 weeks ... so from the 14th of one month to the 14th of the next month.
 

EADC

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It can also mean a period of 4 weeks ... so from the 14th of one month to the 14th of the next month.
No it doesn't a calendar month means from the 1st of the month to the last, 30 days notice refers to what you mention.
 

SAguy

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No it doesn't a calendar month means from the 1st of the month to the last, 30 days notice refers to what you mention.
Nope, calendar month can also mean from a specific day to another day. There's been a couple of cases of this ended up at CCMA that I know of.
 

Napalm2880

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OK I did it once.. in 2012...
BUT, the company I was at, was a douchebag company... I hadn't received any contract.
I just upped and left the one day... a week later the recruiter who placed me there came shouting at me (obviously because of her commission).

After they harassed me a bit I wrote them a long email and that was the end of it. I claimed the place was unsafe and the co-worker was farting all the time and making me inhale it
:ROFL: :ROFL: :ROFL:
 

Steamy Tom

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Don't be silly, I'm not suggesting anything underhanded.

Why use their resources? Who said anything about drawing a salary from the new guys?

Nor sure what the job entails but if it's programming don't you guys work in the evening if you want to?

Yep, being serious. Explain to both companies, stay where you are and help out the new company from home after hours. No need for them to pay but you'd show willing.
moonlighting is generally frowned apon and not tolerated as it is very hard for someone to keep their time separate, also when candles are burned from both ends generally the performance will suffer.
 
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