Revolutionary new free computer training project coming to South Africa

rpm

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This is a really great initiative from the founders. They want to make a real difference by providing high quality, free IT training.
 

Elite Override

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They seem to have good intentions, but I think the free model might attract loads of people who don't really have an interest in the subject. I've personally seen a major percentage of paying students who have zero interest in learning.

Regardless, I honestly hope their project is a success.
 

Chris.Geerdts

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Give me R50 000 x 1000 programmers and I'll train them myself. I'll even give you a discount on that.
 

retromodcoza

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He told MyBroadband that they are working on a funding model where a corporate partner can sponsor a student for R100,000 over two years.

Students will start working as interns in year one, which will add value to them and the companies they work for.
Thats the problem there. Fresh interns that are learning are a net cost to the business , and they won't add value. What they cost as interns needs to be added to the cost of the tuition.

So , the total cost of 2 years won't be R100,000. It will be more like R170,000.

This R170,000 needs to be paid back in some way (through work or repayment) , or else the corporates won't sponsor students. Fresh out of training graduates will be worth about R20,000 a month , give or take.

Thus , the students will have to work 9 months for free , or some years at at a lower salary , in order repay the cost of
the tuition.

They won't work for free for 9 months. Remember - they're disadvantaged students and won't have the ability to last this long without an income. They will simply break their contracts and go and work for someone else for a salary.

Similarly , if paid a lower salary (say 60% of the salary in order to reclaim costs) , they will simply break their contracts and work for someone who offers more money. The sponsoring corporate will then lose heavily.

In an environment that desperately needs developers and is willing to poach and pay , the temptation to break contracts will be extremely high. The cost to pursue the students who break contracts will be higher than the original tuition.

If I was the corporate "sponsoring" a student , I would walk away from this deal.

The system may work in France where students have backing and will be successfully sued for breaking a contract , but in South Africa it will be like SANRAL asking users to pay eTolls. They won't be able to enforce it.

That said , I hope they find some solutions to these problems. It ain't an easy thing to do.
 

Nefertiti

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I hope they are successful, however they are not the first to do something like this. The Joburg Centre for Software Engineering (JCSE) has something similar going.
 

Swa

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R50k is keeping costs to a minimum? Oh I see some bitten apples in there. :)

They seem to have good intentions, but I think the free model might attract loads of people who don't really have an interest in the subject. I've personally seen a major percentage of paying students who have zero interest in learning.

Regardless, I honestly hope their project is a success.
I think this will be the biggest problem, train people who are just interested in having a jol. It would work better in a school environment. It's shocking how many schools are unequipped for IT. Even being from the supposedly "advantaged" neighbourhood our IT teacher was not really a programmer.
 

Hamster

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What is it with the world's sudden interest in getting everybody from primary school children to the underprivileged masses to code. Why do we want so many crappy developers in the market (and I say crappy because the reality of the situation is that most of them will be...it is what it is)
 

Sonic2k

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This looks like a clone of stackoverflow.com, complete with bad, sloppy code that doesn't work.

Why do we want so many crappy developers in the market (and I say crappy because the reality of the situation is that most of them will be...it is what it is)
This is the next wave, back in the late 1990s they had the MCSE hype wave to ride, now they can't ride any of those waves to sell their overpriced "qualitay education products" to so they come with this tack.

In the future you an I will have to work on kark code that these clowns write.
 

Hamster

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Just to clarify - I'm not saying all if them will be crap. The reality is that we are sitting with a whole lot of crappy talentless developers already who really don't give damn about the quality of their work.

Now if formal education can produce that (ignoring the 90% that dropped out and never even made it to graduation) then you can't help but wonder what free education to the masses will give us.
 

jax_maxit

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I think it's s wonderful idea. With NFSAS running out of funds for students and leaving them stranded in the middle of their degrees or diplomas, this is a welcome relief. Competition for small colleges too. Though R50k per student sounds rather steep. How did they get to those figures? I'm assuming the kids won't graduate with industry recognised certificates such as MCSD?
 

Swa

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What is it with the world's sudden interest in getting everybody from primary school children to the underprivileged masses to code. Why do we want so many crappy developers in the market (and I say crappy because the reality of the situation is that most of them will be...it is what it is)
Tertiary education doesn't produce a lot of good developers either. Most of the worlds good developers are self taught in some way. This is quite a noble idea to expose people that would otherwise not be exposed to it. I just think their focus is wrong.

I think it's s wonderful idea. With NFSAS running out of funds for students and leaving them stranded in the middle of their degrees or diplomas, this is a welcome relief. Competition for small colleges too. Though R50k per student sounds rather steep. How did they get to those figures? I'm assuming the kids won't graduate with industry recognised certificates such as MCSD?
That is the fail. Can't see many companies here going for what is essentially a mass bursary scheme. With a server and dumb terminals it can be reduced to a few thousand per person. Venue and electricity can be sponsored in a setting such as a school.
 

Milano

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What are the qualifying criteria if neither financial nor academic?
 

Swa

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What are the qualifying criteria if neither financial nor academic?
WeThinkCode_ applies neither academic nor financial restrictions, which means that no one will be prevented from entering the training programme.
There will be a strong focus on under-privileged students who cannot afford to attend traditional training institutions.
.
 

DWPTA

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Apart from being such a good initiate and the costs and bad coding and helping the previously disadvantage, I think the previously disadvantage will rather help themselves to the equipment and sell for a quick Rond than to study.

I will give it a max of two weeks before the place is burgled.
 
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Just to clarify - I'm not saying all if them will be crap. The reality is that we are sitting with a whole lot of crappy talentless developers already who really don't give damn about the quality of their work.

Now if formal education can produce that (ignoring the 90% that dropped out and never even made it to graduation) then you can't help but wonder what free education to the masses will give us.
The problem is, people are making them believe that anyone can code. Sure. Anyone can. But like you say, 90% will be schit at it. To code is not to write a letter, it takes a kind logical thinking and an interest in solving problems, which are some skills which is especially lacking in this country.
 

Sonic2k

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The problem is, people are making them believe that anyone can code. Sure. Anyone can. But like you say, 90% will be schit at it. To code is not to write a letter, it takes a kind logical thinking and an interest in solving problems, which are some skills which is especially lacking in this country.
+10
 

GhostSixFour

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R50k is keeping costs to a minimum? Oh I see some bitten apples in there. :)
Yeah. This doesn't make sense. Surely they would be able to do it for a fraction of the cost?
Why have all the macs and not thin clients with a server compiling the code. Hell, it's not like their time is valuable.
 
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