'Ridiculous! How are we supposed to live?' - motorists share their thoughts on SA's 'biggest fuel price hike' yet

thechamp

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#42
This sort of notion is the root of the problem.

As long as people look to government to solve problems the downward spiral will continue. As certainly as night follows day.
You are missing the point, Individuals can certainly sort themselves out, especially those who have money, but what about the millions who depends on public transport? How are you going to get around that without government buy in?
 

Knyro

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#43
You going to be disappointed if you put your hopes on government.
This sort of notion is the root of the problem.

As long as people look to government to solve problems the downward spiral will continue. As certainly as night follows day.
To be fair any large scale public transport system has to have the involvement or at least the permission of the government.
 

Knyro

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#44
You are missing the point, Individuals can certainly sort themselves out, especially those who have money, but what about the millions who depends on public transport? How are you going to get around that without government buy in?
Read my mind. LOL as if somebody is just going to come up with the billions of rands required and fundamentally alter the structure of a city just like that.
 

Arthur

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#45
To be fair any large scale public transport system has to have the involvement or at least the permission of the government.
There's nothing in the nature of reality that requires this to be so. The notion of government as Great Coordinator and Provider is purely cultural.

By the way, the Fuel Levy is Government's solution to the problem of raising money to fund all sorts of other Great Government Solutions.

Once you've drunk the KoolAid, government becomes a tyrant.
 
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Knyro

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#46
There's nothing in the nature of reality that requires this to be so. The notion of government as Great Coordinator and Provider is purely cultural.

By the way, the Fuel Levy is Government's solution to the problem of raising money to fund all sorts of other Great Government Solutions.

Once you've drunk the KoolAid, government becomes a tyrant.
The concept of money, zoning and bylaws is also cultural. This is how society is structured and implementing a public transport system in this framework requires the "Great Coordinator and Provider".
 

Kosmik

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#49
Sounds like you don't know what it's like to go your whole life without access to a car and how drastically it limits the things you can do.
Actually no, I've been there and got the t-shirt. My point was that if you believe the fuel increase is only going to impact those whom have cars, that it would be delusional. Everything is going to be severely impacted.
 

Drifter

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#56
Moving closer to work is not an option, either I travel further , or my wife will have to travel further. I fill up 5 times a month, at least. It's not just the travelling. The impact on ALL other goods is going to be immense. Do you think the retailers are just going to absorb this increase? They have bottom line and will build it into their pricing.
 

genetic

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#57
Moving closer to work is not an option, either I travel further , or my wife will have to travel further. I fill up 5 times a month, at least. It's not just the travelling. The impact on ALL other goods is going to be immense. Do you think the retailers are just going to absorb this increase? They have bottom line and will build it into their pricing.
No, but if an increase of R200 to you monthly budget for such a high traveller is such a concern to your basic well-being, maybe you should rethink your finances?
 

thestaggy

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#58
Christ, if the petrol price or R50 per tank affects all your your life requirements so much, maybe you should find a better job, or move closer to work.
A tank of fuel now costs me R200 more than it did at the beginning of the year. Two tanks a month = R400. What do you think I've had to cut back on. Yes, trips to the pub, fewer weekend braais, less spending on clothes.

This is one person with a 35 km round trip to work everyday. What do you think it costs people that have to go from Joburg to Pretoria/Midrand? Now factor in their cutbacks.

Now factor in how these fuel hikes are hitting us at the shops when we get our groceries.

Now multiply this over thousands, hundreds of thousands, possibly even millions of people and think about the negative economic effects in terms of consumer spending. We're in recession. One way to alleviate that is for the people to spend. How the **** do we spend when merely getting by is now the priority?

It's not just R50.

Too many dozy South Africans that need to start waking up to what is happening.
 
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Seriously

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#59
No, but if an increase of R200 to you monthly budget for such a high traveller is such a concern to your basic well-being, maybe you should rethink your finances?
Not everone earns or take home K30+ per month. The majority in this cuntry earns a minimum wage and have to travel far and early to work coming back home late. Not everyone are as fortunate as you are. Show some empathy. ..at least acknowledge their strife as opposed to look down on them. Also consider this has been gong on for a while now. When the oil price came down the government retained the difference in taxes for Zumas abuse and the price still continued upwards since then. Practically every month.
 

f2wohf

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#60
Not everone earns or take home K30+ per month. The majority in this cuntry earns a minimum wage and have to travel far and early to work coming back home late. Not everyone are as fortunate as you are. Show some empathy. ..at least acknowledge their strife as opposed to look down on them. Also consider this has been gong on for a while now. When the oil price came down the government retained the difference in taxes for Zumas abuse and the price still continued upwards since then. Practically every month.
The petrol price is only a symptom of the disease. As shown many times, petrol in itself is not expensive in SA.

The root of the disease is the spatial inequality and imbalance that forces people to travel long distances and props up petrol as a large part of their expenditures.

Solve the spatial imbalance and you won’t have a petrol price issue since people can go to work walking or by bicycle.
 
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