Russian jet 'crashes' after Moscow take-off

ponder

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#1
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-43024235
Russian jet 'crashes' after Moscow take-off


A Russian airliner carrying 71 passengers and crew has crashed after vanishing from radar screens as it left a Moscow airport for the Urals, media say.

The Saratov Airlines An-148 regional jet was en route to the city of Orsk when it went missing.

An emergency services source has told Interfax news agency the plane crashed and there was "no chance" of survivors.

It reportedly fell near Argunovo, about 80km (50 miles) south-east of Moscow.

According to another news agency, the jet vanished from radar screens two minutes after it left Domodedovo Airport.
 

air

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#8
Not everyone on that jet is a bad person that deserved to die...just saying.
right you are SauRoNZA - Gupta firing squad will suffice (after paying back all ill-gotten gains with a fair 'cost of finance')
 

Gordon_R

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#10
lol are you serious.
Unconfirmed: http://avherald.com/h?article=4b4cb236
Russian News Agencies Lenta and Interfax reports the remains of a second aircraft, a helicopter, were found near the crash site, the two aircraft collided in midair.
Edit: Collisions do still occur (rarely) due to ATC failures. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2002_Uberlingen_mid-air_collision

Edit: Whatever the cause, the aircraft is a modern jet (not an old Soviet rust-bucket), and should not just fall out of the sky: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonov_An-148
 
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Gordon_R

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#14
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-43048921

Speed sensors that were iced over may have caused a passenger jet to crash near Moscow, killing all 71 people on board, investigators say.

The faulty instruments could have given the pilots wrong speed data, Russia's Interstate Aviation Committee said.
A preliminary analysis of the information in the flight recorder indicated that a "special situation" began to develop two and a half minutes after the plane took off, at an altitude of around 1,300m (4,265ft), the committee said, according to Tass news agency.

The speed indicated was 465-470km/h (289-292mph). At that moment, it added, there were divergences between the readings of the speed sensors.
P.S. The helicopter collision theory was false.
 

bromster

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#15
470km/h translates to over 200kt. Very few planes could fall out of the sky at that speed. I suspect that icing definitely played a part, either by physically affecting the aerodynamics of the wing, or blocking pitot tubes. The latter would mean incorrect airspeed and altitude data.

My guess is that passing 5000ft on the climb, the pilots engaged the autopilot which was immediately confused by the incorrect info caused by the icing. The computer probably did something stupid and left the crew inadequate time to react.

Let's see what the investigation finds.
 

The_Assimilator

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#16
Iced-up pitot tubes... the same thing that caused Air France 447 to crash. I would've thought that the Russians would be used to checking for that sort of thing...
 

Nanfeishen

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#17
Iced-up pitot tubes... the same thing that caused Air France 447 to crash. I would've thought that the Russians would be used to checking for that sort of thing...
This ^

It wasnt even extremely cold either, -5 degrees Celsius with some light snow. Not exactly a cold spell.
 

Kelerei

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#20
Cant see an iced up pitot tube causing a jet to crash.
Not directly, but can indirectly be the cause.

See Air France 447. Due to iced-up pitot tubes, temporary inconsistencies in airspeed measurements led to the autopilot disconnecting, whereafter the pilots reacted incorrectly and caused the aircraft to enter an aerodynamic stall, and due to a subsequent breakdown in crew resource management, the stall was not detected until it was too late to recover from.
 
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