SABC radio building evacuated after massive diesel leak, people still trapped

Voicy

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In the good old days, diesel generators were placed on concrete pedestals above floor level in a room either in the basement or at ground floor level. The ground floor being preferable for access etc. The room was, in fact, a "tank" precisely to handle a diesel leak!
Seems that the new millennials need to do a lot of learning about logical designs!
Not only that, but your storage tank should have a 110% capacity bund wall to catch any leak.

That aside, there could be a chance that the daytank level sensor broke, causing the gen pumps to keep going. It's for exactly this reason that you have 1) an overfilling switch to disable the pumps from overfilling the daytank and spilling over and 2) a leak detector that also shuts off the pump the moment it registers liquid in the bund.

But that's just how we do it.
 

Moto Guzzi

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I have seen at a fire safety course where a pan of petrol was lit and put out reasonobly quickly versus the same pan filled with diesel and let it burn a bit. The result surprised all. Quickly all fire extinguisers were used up to no avail, that thing just lighted up again and again, had to get the fire truck to put it out. Not sure of the methods/chemcals used today, and what the difference would be.
 

Voicy

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I have seen at a fire safety course where a pan of petrol was lit and put out reasonobly quickly versus the same pan filled with diesel and let it burn a bit. The result surprised all. Quickly all fire extinguisers were used up to no avail, that thing just lighted up again and again, had to get the fire truck to put it out. Not sure of the methods/chemcals used today, and what the difference would be.
CO2 and foam extinguishers work just fine for putting out flames that just erupted. It's also MUCH better to use around a generator/electrical boards etc.

When you've had a diesel fire going for a while, you need to use dry powder extinguishers (or foam, but then you need 6L and bigger cannisters to do the job) to smother the diesel with a layer. Of course if you use this on a generator you can just about throw it away because the particles get in EVERYWHERE.

We unfortunately had some idiots playing in one of our generator rooms with a powder extinguisher the weekend before handover. We had to send back the entire unit to be overhauled. Damage was around the R6m mark.
 
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Paul_S

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Diesel ignites under pressure not by open flame. What was your comment, as the match one is obviously funny given the fuel type :D
Diesel will ignite with an open flame once it reaches ignition temperature. It has nothing to do with pressure.
Compression ignition works by heating a fuel up to ignition temperature but pressure is not required to make diesel burn.

Soak a rag in diesel and then light it with a match. It takes a few seconds but it will burn very nicely.

A puddle of diesel won't ignite if a match is thrown into it because the match can't heat the puddle of diesel up to ignition temperature.
 

MightyQuin

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Diesel will ignite with an open flame once it reaches ignition temperature. It has nothing to do with pressure.
Compression ignition works by heating a fuel up to ignition temperature but pressure is not required to make diesel burn.

Soak a rag in diesel and then light it with a match. It takes a few seconds but it will burn very nicely.

A puddle of diesel won't ignite if a match is thrown into it because the match can't heat the puddle of diesel up to ignition temperature.
Goog thing Hlaudi isn't still there...al his hot air would have had that diesel heated up in no time at all.
 

schumi

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SABC: Radio Park still not safe to operate following diesel spill

JOHANNESBURG – The South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) said that its Radio Park building in Auckland Park was still not safe as cleaning up operations continue following a diesel spill.
Staff members are therefore not allowed to access the building.
The public broadcaster said that a power outage on Wednesday resulted in the internal system switching to a back-up generator and due to the aging equipment, the diesel tank started overflowing.
Staff were immediately evacuated.
The SABC's Vuyo Mthembu said that this hasn't affected their radio broadcasts.
More at: https://ewn.co.za/2019/05/16/sabc-radio-park-still-not-safe-to-operate-following-diesel-spill
 

Voicy

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due to the aging equipment, the diesel tank started overflowing.
Voicy said:
That aside, there could be a chance that the daytank level sensor broke, causing the gen pumps to keep going. It's for exactly this reason that you have 1) an overfilling switch to disable the pumps from overfilling the daytank and spilling over and 2) a leak detector that also shuts off the pump the moment it registers liquid in the bund.

But that's just how we do it.
:whistling:
 

ToxicBunny

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https://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/diesel-spill-sabc-radio-building-a-no-go-zone-floors-might-need-to-be-knocked-out-20190516
The SABC's Radio Park building in Auckland Park, Johannesburg, remains sealed off on Thursday as cleanup operations continue, following a diesel spill on Wednesday.

News24 reported that 2 000 litres of diesel had leaked from a generator on the 15th floor.

Employees were evacuated and were told to stay at home on Thursday, SABC spokesperson Vuyo Mthembu told News24.
They're even talking of the possibility of having to actually knock out floors to remove the contaminant...

Nobody is even vaguely answering why the fsck there is a generator on the 15th floor of a building though...
 

Acid0

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Nobody is even vaguely answering why the fsck there is a generator on the 15th floor of a building though...
We all know the sangoma can send the electricity from Durban, but what they did not tell us was he can only send it to the 14th floor, so we need electricity from the 15th up
 

c3n0byt3

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https://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/diesel-spill-sabc-radio-building-a-no-go-zone-floors-might-need-to-be-knocked-out-20190516


They're even talking of the possibility of having to actually knock out floors to remove the contaminant...

Nobody is even vaguely answering why the fsck there is a generator on the 15th floor of a building though...
Maybe it's a national key point (emergency transmissions etc) and they thought it'd be a good idea to keep it close to what they are powering? :unsure:
 

ToxicBunny

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Maybe it's a national key point (emergency transmissions etc) and they thought it'd be a good idea to keep it close to what they are powering? :unsure:
It is an NKP, but the whole precinct is such...

I've had a vague look around and it seems that placing generators on a high floor in a building is just not something people do, at least not that I can find.... so I would love for someone to explain the logic...
 

MEIOT

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It is an NKP, but the whole precinct is such...

I've had a vague look around and it seems that placing generators on a high floor in a building is just not something people do, at least not that I can find.... so I would love for someone to explain the logic...
Well....SOE's and logic don't usually go hand in hand,
 

ToxicBunny

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Well....SOE's and logic don't usually go hand in hand,
Obviously... this goes without saying..

But I'm actually being serious, I would love for someone to explain the logic, because a service provider must have done the work for them...
 
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