SAPS Set Detection Sights Low

LazyLion

King of de Jungle
Joined
Mar 17, 2005
Messages
104,620
Fictional super-sleuth Sherlock Holmes always aimed to solve 100 percent of the cases brought before him, but SA Police Service detectives have their sights set much lower.

Briefing MPs on Thursday, senior police officers said their detective service aimed to increase its detection rate for serious crimes this year to 56.5 percent (1,082,861 cases) of the total number of cases reported.

Of the 1,082,861 cases, a total of 190,243 would become "trial-ready case dockets".

These targets provoked concern among members of Parliament's police portfolio committee, who demanded an explanation.

Freedom Front Plus MP Pieter Groenewald wanted to know why only 17.5 percent of serious crime cases went to court.

"If we look at the figures... we have 1,082,861 reported cases. Then, if we look at the trial-ready cases... [a total of] 190,423 physical cases, we're only talking about 17.5 percent of the detected cases.

"So we're telling South Africans that as far as reported cases are concerned, in only 17.5 percent of those cases do we have trial-ready dockets... I want to know what is the real problem," he said.

The committee was being briefed by the police department on the detective service programme contained in its 2013/14 Annual Performance Plan.

According to this document, "serious crime" includes so-called contact crime, contact-related crime, property-related crime "and other serious crime and crime detected as a result of police action".

Responding to Groenewald's question, divisional commissioner detective services Vinesh Moonoo said the other cases were still being investigated.

"The other cases are still under investigation -- which are not yet ready for trial -- or there are others where there are still no suspects arrested. So it will be still in the system, still under investigation," he said.

Acting committee chairwoman Annelize van Wyk told the police delegation the committee was not happy.

She acknowledged the 2013/14 conviction rate for serious crime needed to be taken into account, because the target set for this was higher (313,144 cases) than the number of trial-ready case dockets.

This supported the assertion that some cases were still under investigation.

"It runs over from one year to another. But it still remains that we are not happy. The problem starts with the number of cases detected. That's where it starts. This committee is still not happy with that.

"This programme has received resources that no other programme in the department received last year. In fact, you've received resources over the past 10 years... that no other section within the department has received.

"So we can no longer accept these kinds of figures. The problem starts with closed and detected [cases]," she said

The performance plan made no reference to closed cases.

"The number of [serious crime] cases closed undetected must be in; it's not in [the document]. We need that figure. That is the important figure," Van Wyk said.

According to the plan, the serious crime detection rate target for 2013/14 is 56 percent, or 1,082,932 actual cases. This implies there are a total of about 1.93 million such cases, of which about 850,000 will be unsolved.

Democratic Alliance MP Dianne Kohler-Barnard said targets were being set too low.

"We're seeing low detection rates for serious crimes; we're looking at a [2013/14] target of just 1.5 percent [up on the previous year]. Next year [2014/15] you aim for 2.5 percent [increase in the detection rate for serious crime], and after that nothing, you just want to maintain the status quo in 2015/16."

There was no indication the detective service had any hope of decreasing serious crime in its 2015/16 medium-term target.

"At no stage do you seem to actually aim for the aspirational 100 percent when it comes to conviction rates. Isn't that your job? We pay you billions and billions, but nobody seems able to raise the bar.

"We're looking at minute increases... nobody sets aspirational targets any more... We're seeing little, miniscule targets. Is it because you don't reach the targets that you don't want to set yourselves up to fail?" she asked.


Source : Sapa /rod/hdw/jk/th
Date : 18 Apr 2013 16:22
 

daveza

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 5, 2004
Messages
46,286
Uhm.... when did ' detected' become the verb form of detective ?
 

Maverick Jester

The Special One
Joined
Oct 18, 2011
Messages
13,424
Whilst the proposed figures are rather pathetic, I don't seem to see any tangible consequences mentioned by this committee for non-delivery of an adequate police force...
 

LazyLion

King of de Jungle
Joined
Mar 17, 2005
Messages
104,620
Uhm.... when did ' detected' become the verb form of detective ?

Define: Detected

detected past participle, past tense of de·tect (Verb)
Verb

1. Discover or identify the presence or existence of.
2. Discover or investigate (a crime or its perpetrators).
 

marine1

Honorary Master
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
49,078
These days, even if you get arrested, convicted and sent to jail, you will still get out soon, some prick politicians birthday or something else.
 

Sinbad

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 5, 2006
Messages
78,440
Define: Detected

detected past participle, past tense of de·tect (Verb)
Verb

1. Discover or identify the presence or existence of.
2. Discover or investigate (a crime or its perpetrators).

I think they're actually using it to mean the 1st definition. The cops are only aware of the presence of 17% of crimes.
 

daveza

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 5, 2004
Messages
46,286
Yeah, I always thought it was detectoringed.

"It runs over from one year to another. But it still remains that we are not happy. The problem starts with the number of cases detected.

Do they really mean cases which have had a detective investigating ?

Or what ?
 

daveza

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 5, 2004
Messages
46,286
The cops are only aware of the presence of 17% of crimes.

I considered that, but if they weren't aware of the crimes, then how do they know about the 83% of crimes they aren't aware of.
 

Sinbad

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 5, 2006
Messages
78,440
I considered that, but if they weren't aware of the crimes, then how do they know about the 83% of crimes they aren't aware of.

hmmm.

I smell a conspiracy here.

I think they know about them, but they won't ADMIT to knowing about them.
 

R/SGT

Expert Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2006
Messages
1,606
The government needs to pump more money into recruiting and training a professional police force.

They also need to realize that it doesn't work like CSI on TV (Unless it is a major case that appears in the news), most of our detectives will be working on an average of 20 dockets at one time and it is up to them to investigate them based on the available information. Which very is minimal.

We had a housebreaking a while ago and opened a case, but it was cold from the start as the forensics unit could not get any fingerprints or other evidence. The only way they could catch them is if they find the stolen goods or they are caught for something else and confess to our robbery.

I have seen plenty of cases like this of all types.

The detective units do need to be improved but the state needs to step up
 

grok

Honorary Master
Joined
Dec 20, 2007
Messages
26,325
I see no problem here .. the number of 'detections' target are just mimicing the matric results. It is inevitable really.
 
Top