School dropouts up by at least 30% in South Africa's lockdown

Jan

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School dropouts increased drastically during lockdown in South Africa

Between 650,000 and 750,000 children aged seven to 17 were not attending school as of May this year, compared to the 400,000 to 500,000 figure from before the national lockdown.

This is according to the National Income Dynamics Study — Coronavirus Rapid Mobile Survey (NIDS-CRAM), which is conducted every few months by a selection of professors from Stellenbosch University and the University of Cape Town.

Co-author and researcher at Stellenbosch University Debra Shepherd told the Sunday Times that this increase does not completely represent a permanent dropout, as many of these learners may return to school after the lockdown ends.

“We should expect to see some of these learners return, but how many is difficult to say," said Shepherd.
 

zizo911

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I wonder how many of those dropouts were just converted to home schooling instead?
Im sure a few parents realized it isnt that tough and just decided to continue that way.
There was so many applications for schooling from home, as well as home schooling. One of the teachers quit his job last due because his online school business grew so big he was running out of staff to hire.
So yes, the most likely thing is that many parents chose one of those options which DBE made easier to do last year.
 

bwana

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I wonder how many of those dropouts were just converted to home schooling instead?
Im sure a few parents realized it isnt that tough and just decided to continue that way.
Not many I'd wager - afaik students below grade 10 have to apply and register for home schooling so their numbers would be known.

Since the article specifies students between seven and 17 that would leave just 16/17 year olds who don't have to register with the dept.
 

MeestaR

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You know, when lockdown started and schools moved to online classes and such, there were many pupils left out on the cold, because they cannot afford to have basic uncapped internet, computers, etc. But, they have cellphones.
Many schools made sure that those pupils got the study material and teachers made themselves available via Whatsapp, should a pupil need info/help on schoolwork.

Then, you get the kids who think thay can play videogames all day, and not attend school, because lockdown, or some lame excuse to not attend online class.

All my cousins that is still in school, passed with good marks, despite lockdown, extended holidays, not able to join classes in person, etc. Because they were motivated.

Kids need motivation to attend class, be it in person or online. Or is something else at play here?
 

Enzo Matrix

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You know, when lockdown started and schools moved to online classes and such, there were many pupils left out on the cold, because they cannot afford to have basic uncapped internet, computers, etc. But, they have cellphones.
Many schools made sure that those pupils got the study material and teachers made themselves available via Whatsapp, should a pupil need info/help on schoolwork.

Then, you get the kids who think thay can play videogames all day, and not attend school, because lockdown, or some lame excuse to not attend online class.

All my cousins that is still in school, passed with good marks, despite lockdown, extended holidays, not able to join classes in person, etc. Because they were motivated.

Kids need motivation to attend class, be it in person or online. Or is something else at play here?
You have a very first world view and experiences as is shown by your gross ignorance of the problem

My child is now in a home schooling environment. The home school is pretty good but they are a small outfit and cannot yet cater for online schooling. So in our case we do what we can at home until he goes back. This itself is still not remotely representative of the majority of people

I would hazard a guess that most kids and most schools in the lower and mediu. brackets dont have online schooling, dont have computers nor fibre etc etc etc. Public schools sure as hell wont for the most part.

If you are lucky enough to have your kid in a private school then its much smoother sailing with regards to online schooling in general
 

Mystic Twilight

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Data on unemployed youth who just passed the average age for finishing schooling, in ten years time is going to suck I reckon.
 

RedViking

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Probably went to try find work because mom or dad has lost theirs.
 
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ShaunSA

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At least we know they're still alive

Sides we don't need no education :cool:
 

rvZA

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Not many I'd wager - afaik students below grade 10 have to apply and register for home schooling so their numbers would be known.

Since the article specifies students between seven and 17 that would leave just 16/17 year olds who don't have to register with the dept.

I suspect it is way more than you think.

Yes, you have to apply at the school you enter your children with. Also complete and send the required forms to the DOE.

I completed the DOE's forms last year for my 3 children and mailed it to them. After 4 months of Home Schooling I mailed them and asked them if they have received the forms. Never heard from them.

Earlier this year my youngest daughter wanted to go back to school. We went to the DOE's offices. They checked their systems and according to them she has never left for home schooling.

So, I suspect government would not have this type of statistics. You will only find it when you contact the online schools. I know Teneo online school has increased by thousands of new learners this year alone.
 

Other Pineapple Smurf

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I wonder how many of those dropouts were just converted to home schooling instead?
Im sure a few parents realized it isnt that tough and just decided to continue that way.
I would say a small percentage.

Talking to teachers at public schools it is really bad. Many kids don't even have access to a phone never mind sufficient data.

I've attended half a dozen presentations this year from charities who serve Sir Lowry's Pass and it's sad hearing the challenges children face.

Most parents are too busy to home school or just don't care about their kids education.
 
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