Smartphone charging myths - Are you killing your battery?

Arthur

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Aug 7, 2003
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#4
Just a thought: Indicating 100% battery charge on a device doesn't necessarily mean that from an electrical viewpoint the Li-ion battery is actually at 100%. It's all software, and I would have thought many device-makers would protect Li-ion batts from a risky 'true' 100% charge by having the firmware controlling the charge circuit stop charging at say 85-95% but display 100% on the UI.
 

R13...

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Aug 4, 2008
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#5
Just a thought: Indicating 100% battery charge on a device doesn't necessarily mean that from an electrical viewpoint the Li-ion battery is actually at 100%. It's all software, and I would have thought many device-makers would protect Li-ion batts from a risky 'true' 100% charge by having the firmware controlling the charge circuit stop charging at say 85-95% but display 100% on the UI.
As long as they disclose it before someone sues them for short selling them. o/t: my headphones stop charging at "full", so safe to charge overnight.
 

Rocket-Boy

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Jul 31, 2007
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7,502
#6
Just a thought: Indicating 100% battery charge on a device doesn't necessarily mean that from an electrical viewpoint the Li-ion battery is actually at 100%. It's all software, and I would have thought many device-makers would protect Li-ion batts from a risky 'true' 100% charge by having the firmware controlling the charge circuit stop charging at say 85-95% but display 100% on the UI.
That makes the most sense, display 100% but dont actually get to 100%.
They could easily talk their way out of it if some sensitive soul complained that it wasnt a true 100% by saying its 100% of what it is allowed to charge to.
 

epah

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Apr 22, 2014
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#7
Who cares, charge your phone however it suits you, batteries will deteriorate over time regardless of how and when you charge them.
 

Arthur

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#8
I'd be very surprised if an indicated 100% charge is also 100% charge from an electro-chemical viewpoint. The Li-ion scientists are right, but they're talking about charge percentages measures in a lab. I would think most mass-produced consumer devices actually stop the charging before the battery is at the edge, and indicate 100% but in reality it's within a 10-20% safety margin.

This is of course pure supposition.
 
Last edited:
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May 9, 2012
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#10
My phone detects when it's usually charged and trickles the charge in so it reaches 100% just before its unplugged.

Dunno what that means, but cool feature.
 

CataclysmZA

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#12
I would think most mass-produced consumer devices actually stop the charging before the battery is at the edge, and indicate 100% but in reality it's within a 10-20% safety margin.

This is of course pure supposition.
Can confirm. Every laptop here in the house with a working battery, across several generations, is built to a higher specification, but under-provisioned. The battery in my Aspire One is technically 4700mAh, but is rated and reports as a 4000mAh unit.

It's the same for phones as well, which is why the iPhone range has such weird battery numbers. Apple packs in as many cells as they can, and then provisions them about 20% under capacity.
 

centurionguy

Active Member
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Aug 6, 2007
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45
#14
I charge overnight everynight

I habitually plug my phone into a charger when I go to bed and leave it there all night.
Usually the charge level is well below 50% at the end of the day, sometime even at auto shutdown.
According to this article, I'm doing everything wrong.

However, my Samsung S6 still has excellent battery life even after three years, and my current S8 shows no signs of a degraded battery after 18 months.

Go figure.
 

Ecco

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Jun 4, 2007
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7,482
#15
So even samsung suggests that you dont charge your phone to 100%. I guess the reason they havent built in some smart logic into their phone that stops charging at 80% is because they want to sell more phones and batteries?
 

Park@82

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Jun 6, 2008
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11,617
#17
This is why I would still like to see user replaceable batteries in new phones.

On my previous phones I never worried about looking after the batteries.
I would just buy a new/spare battery after a year.

On my new phone (S8), this is no longer an option but luckily the S8 has some new battery tech that should keep it from degrading as quickly as its predecessors.

Samsung claims the Galaxy S8's battery won't wear out as quickly as the Galaxy S7. After two years of use, Samsung R&D boss Oh Boo-keun told us the Galaxy S8 should still hold 95 percent of its charge.
https://www.cnet.com/news/samsung-galaxy-s8-battery-claims/

Specifically, Samsung says that after two years' worth of charges and discharges, the Galaxy S7 only maintained about 80% of its total effective battery capacity. The Galaxy S8 and S8+, however, will maintain 95% of their capacity over that same period with the same usage. Samsung isn't going into the specifics of how this was accomplished, which isn't surprising, but it could perhaps both be the battery itself and advancements with the charging and power management systems.
https://www.androidpolice.com/2017/...ill-degrade-less-quickly-than-the-galaxy-s7s/

Time will tell, I guess.
 
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The_MAC

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Oct 11, 2012
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#18
And they didn't even talk about power-banks in the article, use or don't use?

Again, as mentioned, stop treating your phone like a moody schitzo, just use the damn thing, its what its meant to do
 

pinball wizard

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Feb 9, 2010
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14,099
#19
And they didn't even talk about power-banks in the article, use or don't use?

Again, as mentioned, stop treating your phone like a moody schitzo, just use the damn thing, its what its meant to do
**** you say. You actually mean use it to make and receive calls? Surely you jest...
 
Joined
Feb 12, 2018
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#20
Charged my S3 every night and used it for 3 years. My son then started using it and we only replaced the battery last year. 5.5 years on the original battery!!!
 
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