Solar energy at US$1 per watt

Syndyre

Honorary Master
Joined
Jan 26, 2006
Messages
16,822
#21
Wow. Amazing stuff.:cool:

The important part is the way they are manufactured, not those random kWh and dollar amounts you guys are throwing around:



  • No silicon involved.
  • Manufacturing cost is about 10% of current panels.
  • Printed onto rolls of aluminum.
Link

The magnitude of the breakthrough can be clearly seen on this table.
Quite incredible, could be the beginning of a major breakthrough, at that price you could cover your whole roof in solar panels and probably get a ROI pretty quickly, especially considering it'd still work when Eskom load sheds you.
 

kaspaas

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2003
Messages
3,739
#24
If this works, and I believe it does, it presents a major opportunity to all South Africans.

Is there already a South African agent?

For a relative low cost, one can dump Eskom and the city council (Tshwane in my case) for most electricity requirements.

If the claims are true, one would be able to run all PC's in most offices from the sun. No more loadshedding headaches.

There is however a minor thingy I could not find:

How efficient is this system, how many square meters does one need for a single watt?
 
Last edited:

Syndyre

Honorary Master
Joined
Jan 26, 2006
Messages
16,822
#25
If this works, and I believe it does, it presents a major opportunity to all South Africans.

Is there already a South African agent?

For a relative low cost, one can dump Eskom and the city council (Tshwane in my case) for most electricity requirements.

If the claims are true, one would be able to run all PC's in most offices from the sun. No more loadshedding headaches.

There is however a minor thingy I could not find:

How efficient is this system, how many square meters does one need for a single watt?
I don't think there's an agent, it could be very profitable to be that agent though. Can't find any mention of efficiency, presumably it shouldn't be much worse than normal solar panels though.
 

ToxicBunny

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
Messages
79,791
#28
Personally I think if its cheap enough, there will be people in Eskom that push for people to get these kind of things installed, and of course if its cheap enough I'll gladly jump on the bandwagon to lessen my dependence on Eks-dom and their inability to provide a steady supply of electricity.

I think in some ways its going to become the norm in this country that the more affluent people will self-provide more of their basic necessities such as electricity and water.
 

Syndyre

Honorary Master
Joined
Jan 26, 2006
Messages
16,822
#29
So what do you think - how long until we can get these cells up and running here?

http://www.digg.com/environment/Solar_Power_Now_Cheaper_than_Coal

Sounds like the perfect solution for SA, only problem is what happens when there's not enough sun? Is solar suitable for base load generation? Saw an interesting comment on digg:

digg said:
However, as with all renewables, you cannot have more than ~20% of the network from unreliable sources as they will destabilise the distribution grid. You still need nuclear power stations to supply the base electrical load and make up the spinning reserve to account for short term fluctuations in the electrical frequency.
Not sure if its true?

Personally I think if its cheap enough, there will be people in Eskom that push for people to get these kind of things installed, and of course if its cheap enough I'll gladly jump on the bandwagon to lessen my dependence on Eks-dom and their inability to provide a steady supply of electricity.

I think in some ways its going to become the norm in this country that the more affluent people will self-provide more of their basic necessities such as electricity and water.
Yeah I think it'll be more people putting up their own panels etc, which would lessen the load on the grid anyway so everybody wins. We already provide our own security, healthcare etc. so why not other services I guess.
 

Valis

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2007
Messages
1,243
#30
Yeah, does this take into account the full cost to the environment re. manufacturing? What about the cost of the lead-acid batteries needed to store the power? Or the rectifiers and regulators? These things all take a lot of maintenance (believe me, I've done it). Photo-voltaic cells just have too large a carbon footprint to be worthwhile. Nuclear's the only way to go.
 

Valis

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2007
Messages
1,243
#31
We already provide our own security, healthcare etc. so why not other services I guess.
At the risk of sounding pedantic, this is what I've been saying all along. We can provide our own services via the free-market much more economically and efficiently. Government is the enemy of the people. :sick:
 

Syndyre

Honorary Master
Joined
Jan 26, 2006
Messages
16,822
#32
At the risk of sounding pedantic, this is what I've been saying all along. We can provide our own services via the free-market much more economically and efficiently. Government is the enemy of the people. :sick:
Won't argue with you there. Problem is in most cases we pay taxes that are supposed to cover these services and then have to pay extra for something that actually works.
 
Top