Solar geysers - are they a scam?

wingnut771

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I think there is an element of pressure circulation and temp release valves and such....

I don't know the specifics of that just the during summer my geyser is off at the dB and the water is still **** hot for my morning shower.
how much water comes out the pipe outside during the day?
 

Splinter

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Unfortunately I didn't have the energy monitoring in place before the geyser replacement but:

1. My electricity bill dropped from between R900 to R1100 per month to around R600 to R700 per month and that is not even taking tariff increases into account.

Ok. I would like any other of these rather fervent (sorry folks, but you are being quite heated :) ) supporters of a solar geyser to say they also got at least a R300 per month saving after installing it.

And that is without other cost saving measures.
 
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Splinter

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Shame... You also found a stupid tooth fairy as well... You may want to see a doctor about this condition of attracting stupid....

I'm taking it that your, rather unreal, vitriol comes from the fact that you are involved with solar panels in some form or other?
 

Paul_S

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Ok. I would like any other of these rather fervent (sorry folks, but you are being quite heated :) ) supporters of a solat geyser to say they also got at least a R300 per month saving after installing it.

And that is without other cost saving measures.

I guess one way to check the savings is to cover my solar collectors with blankets for a month but I don't feel like paying for the experiment. :)
I also didn't make any other cost saving measures in the interim. Lights were already all 5W LED, haven't swapped out any appliances, etc.
 

Splinter

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I guess one way to check the savings is to cover my solar collectors with blankets for a month but I don't feel like paying for the experiment. :)
I also didn't make any other cost saving measures in the interim. Lights were already all 5W LED, haven't swapped out any appliances, etc.


I was actually asking others if they had made your claimed R300 a month saving with a solar geyser.
 

isie

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So your timer has a heat gauge as well then?
yep Geyser wise Max
FTW

And again - you set something (an electrical component?) to kick off your element - which is heated by electricity.
yes Geyser wise Max as mentioned above, its the brains of the operation
but it only switches on the element if it needs to.
and the electrical component use less then a led bulb, and depending on the temp of the water either 0 or a few KWs for the element
your regular geyser will use at least what 7-10Kw everyday (a couple of times a day) to heat up water from 25-30C to 50-60C, s mines uses the sun to get it to as high as possible and if its not the desired temp then the element only kicks in as needed say the sun water warmed it to 45C and my desired temp is 50C thats maybe 1-2Kw used to warm up water from 45 to 50C on that day
the pump to pump the water uses again a few watts again barely as much as an led bulb yes i have a 220v one, but you get 12 v solar pumps as well
 

Splinter

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yep Geyser wise Max
FTW


yes Geyser wise Max as mentioned above, its the brains of the operation
but it only switches on the element if it needs to.
and the electrical component use less then a led bulb, and depending on the temp of the water either 0 or a few KWs for the element
your regular geyser will use at least what 7-10Kw everyday (a couple of times a day) to heat up water from 25-30C to 50-60C, s mines uses the sun to get it to as high as possible and if its not the desired temp then the element only kicks in as needed say the sun water warmed it to 45C and my desired temp is 50C thats maybe 1-2Kw used to warm up water from 45 to 50C on that day
the pump to pump the water uses again a few watts again barely as much as an led bulb yes i have a 220v one, but you get 12 v solar pumps as well

Firstly, you are making a few assumptions here.

But at least you are admitting there is a pump, to pump the water. As apposed to @ToxicBunny

Anyway - my point is, and what I did not understand until today, is that a "solar" geyser still requires electricity.

In fact, it will not operate properly (or at all) without electricity? Yes or no?

And it costs a shyte load more than a normal geyser.
 

Speedster

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Firstly, you are making a few assumptions here.

But at least you are admitting there is a pump, to pump the water. As apposed to @ToxicBunny

Anyway - my point is, and what I did not understand until today, is that a "solar" geyser still requires electricity.

In fact, it will not operate properly (or at all) without electricity? Yes or no?

And it costs a shyte load more than a normal geyser.
It seems your want to believe your "installer's” BS.

Some solar geyser systems have a pump. Mine is a 12v, 10 watt pump that runs off a small solar panel so even during load shedding I have no issues. Even if the pump were to use Eskom power it would need to run for 300 hours to equal the same usage as 1 hour of element usage. As many others have said, the element serves as a backup to heat the water should the sun not have done the job during the day. Right now my water is at 60 degrees, after 3 kids have bathed. It should still be in the high 50s by the time I shower on the morning which is plenty hot as a hot shower is about 40 degrees.

Other systems have no pump and work via thermosyphon (Google it).

Tl;dr: your guy is talking a load of bull. Our family of 5 saves at least R500pm since we moved to solar.
 

Pilgrim

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So your timer has a heat gauge as well then?

And again - you set something (an electrical component?) to kick off your element - which is heated by electricity.

Hi Splinter, all I can give you is my personal experience. We had a solar geyser that we turned off for about 9 months of the year. It gave us really hot water without any electricity.

It had an electric element that we allowed to turn on during winter, however on a sunny day the element was hardly used, the thermostat did not turn it on.

I cannot supply you with numbers as we bought the house with the geyser already there.

It does work without ANY electricity during summer.
 

Pilgrim

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Firstly, you are making a few assumptions here.

But at least you are admitting there is a pump, to pump the water. As apposed to @ToxicBunny

Anyway - my point is, and what I did not understand until today, is that a "solar" geyser still requires electricity.

In fact, it will not operate properly (or at all) without electricity? Yes or no?

And it costs a shyte load more than a normal geyser.
There are different types, the one we had worked without electricity
 

ToxicBunny

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Firstly, you are making a few assumptions here.

But at least you are admitting there is a pump, to pump the water. As apposed to @ToxicBunny

Anyway - my point is, and what I did not understand until today, is that a "solar" geyser still requires electricity.

In fact, it will not operate properly (or at all) without electricity? Yes or no?

And it costs a shyte load more than a normal geyser.
No you point currently seems to be that you will blindly believe an idiot because they claim to be a sparky or a plumber....
 

Paul_S

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You only need a pump to circulate the water if the geyser is at the same level or lower than the solar collectors.
If the geyser is above the collectors (like mine) then no pump is fitted because it can thermosyphon.
 

johnjm

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I'm not a believer in solar.

We are a family of five and utilise a geyser timer. It's on one hour a day from 5pm to 6pm in summer, and another hour from 5am to 6am in winter.

I can calculate the energy usage if need be, max 4khw per day in summer but is usually less.

What does a solar geyser utilise on average?
 

ToxicBunny

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I'm not a believer in solar.

We are a family of five and utilise a geyser timer. It's on one hour a day from 5pm to 6pm in summer, and another hour from 5am to 6am in winter.

I can calculate the energy usage if need be, max 4khw per day in summer but is usually less.

What does a solar geyser utilise on average?
The answer to that is how long is a piece of string... It depends on the day and the location etc etc.
 
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