Solar geysers - are they a scam?

Splinter

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He has a 'guy'... That would set my alarm bells ringing.. Screwing with things like this is not when you trust a 'guy'...

He could still do a good job of course but I would suggest if you do choose them that you do independent research so you can know when he is spouting shyte...

Agreed. I've asked for different options. Then also a quote when we were having a bit of aggro. I don't if this is kudos to him, but he says they need to come over to see what the draw is first.
 

ToxicBunny

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Agreed. I've asked for different options. Then also a quote when we were having a bit of aggro. I don't if this is kudos to him, but he says they need to come over to see what the draw is first.
Would hardly call that kudos... That would be standard practice... If anyone quoted without that I'd instantly throw the quote away.
 

Splinter

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Would hardly call that kudos... That would be standard practice... If anyone quoted without that I'd instantly throw the quote away.

To be fair, how many folks here have mentioned such a practice before?

Although, most seem to be trying a DIY approach.
 

ToxicBunny

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To be fair, how many folks here have mentioned such a practice before?

Although, most seem to be trying a DIY approach.
Of the 4 guys I've contacted over the years. All of them wanted to do a site survey and check the draw of the house.
 

Speedster

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I'm looking to retrofit the geyser at my new place with some evacuated tubes. The best place for the tubes seems to be up on the roof about 3m above the geyser. Would the height be an issue for the circulation pump?
 

thehuman

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I'm looking to retrofit the geyser at my new place with some evacuated tubes. The best place for the tubes seems to be up on the roof about 3m above the geyser. Would the height be an issue for the circulation pump?
Don't think so , it is a closed loop so gravity do not matter.
 

isie

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I'm looking to retrofit the geyser at my new place with some evacuated tubes. The best place for the tubes seems to be up on the roof about 3m above the geyser. Would the height be an issue for the circulation pump?
No , the height won't be an issue for the pump- you could consider adding insulation to the pipes coming into the geyser from the panels just to decrease any heat loss for water that remains in the pipes.
 

Speedster

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No , the height won't be an issue for the pump- you could consider adding insulation to the pipes coming into the geyser from the panels just to decrease any heat loss for water that remains in the pipes.
Thanks. I'll definitely insulate all the piping
 

Polymathic

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Are these available in SA? So far I've only found company's that work with traditional heat pump systems
 

Academic

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Scam is a bit harsh. But, I put in an electricity backup solution together with a solar geyser and then added solar panels a few months after. In hindsight, I should have foregone the solar geyser for more solar panels and heated the water in midday when I have too much electricity available.

Electricity from solar panels give you flexibility; you do not have to use that electricity to heat water, but you can.
 

buyeye

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Scam is a bit harsh. But, I put in an electricity backup solution together with a solar geyser and then added solar panels a few months after. In hindsight, I should have foregone the solar geyser for more solar panels and heated the water in midday when I have too much electricity available.

Electricity from solar panels give you flexibility; you do not have to use that electricity to heat water, but you can.
Hi I'm thinking of heating my water with solar but my problem is that I have a 4kw element in my 200l geyser. I only have a 5kw inverter which can power the 4kw element and can blend solar and grid.

The problem is obvious that I cannot use anything else with the geyser on. The best option I think is to upgrade to a 8kw sunsynk and put the geyser on the non essential side but my inverter is only 4 months old and could last 10 years before it needs replacing.

I could downgrade the element to a 2kw one and connect it to my 5kw inverter.

I'm just not sure what the downside is to downgrading my geyser element.
 

Speedster

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Hi I'm thinking of heating my water with solar but my problem is that I have a 4kw element in my 200l geyser. I only have a 5kw inverter which can power the 4kw element and can blend solar and grid.

The problem is obvious that I cannot use anything else with the geyser on. The best option I think is to upgrade to a 8kw sunsynk and put the geyser on the non essential side but my inverter is only 4 months old and could last 10 years before it needs replacing.

I could downgrade the element to a 2kw one and connect it to my 5kw inverter.

I'm just not sure what the downside is to downgrading my geyser element.
What inverter do you currently have? Can it not pull the excess you require from the grid?
 

SHL

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As usual, when Eskom crumbles a bit more, and we get some consistent load-shedding, folks scramble for alternative solutions.

And then sellers of such items resort to price-gouging.

I have seen solar geysers mentioned as a MASSIVE (hehe) electricity saving device; on a number of threads. So, when talking to the chap I'm looking at for installing an inverter system, I asked what his thoughts were about a solar geyser as well.

As posted on the load-shedding solutions thread, he called them a big scam. So, in essence, this is what he said:

You are constantly using power to run a small pump that pushes water from geyser to panel. At night, the element has to work harder to maintain warm water. And because it's outside, it is exposed to the weather and element has to work harder to maintain warm water. In essence the element has a much harder life as it is constantly switching on and off.

And then in winter you are going to have cloudy days etc. So a normal geyser is just as electricity efficient overall as a solar geyser.

Except a solar geyser costs a lot more.


So, any thoughts from others here? Especially those who have installed solar geysers.
What a load of....

 

Steamy Tom

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Hi I'm thinking of heating my water with solar but my problem is that I have a 4kw element in my 200l geyser. I only have a 5kw inverter which can power the 4kw element and can blend solar and grid.

The problem is obvious that I cannot use anything else with the geyser on. The best option I think is to upgrade to a 8kw sunsynk and put the geyser on the non essential side but my inverter is only 4 months old and could last 10 years before it needs replacing.

I could downgrade the element to a 2kw one and connect it to my 5kw inverter.

I'm just not sure what the downside is to downgrading my geyser element.

the downside is it will take longer to heat.

if it were me i would maybe downgrade to like a 3kw, and then see my general pattern and set it to only power at those times.

i think you might also get dual elements, not sure
 

Academic

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the downside is it will take longer to heat.

if it were me i would maybe downgrade to like a 3kw, and then see my general pattern and set it to only power at those times.

i think you might also get dual elements, not sure
Why worry about the 4kw element? As long as the geyser is on the non-essential grid then all is fine; inverter will just add grid as needed.
 

w1z4rd

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We have a solar heated geyser. Its pretty hot and works very well. Its completely off grid. We hardly ever have to switch it on at the board. Even after rainy days.
 

itareanlnotani

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I have a solar heated geyser. Actually 3 of them over 2 properties.

I'm going to install a normal geyser in my new main house.
Don't see the need for a solar heated one, when solar panels are so cheap. Need to persuade the building inspector that it will be equivalent to mandated solar heating on new builds though.

Installing 9KW of panels with a 8KW inverter, so power won't be much of an issue...
 
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