South Africa’s broadband prices improving, but speed still lacking

whatwhat

Executive Member
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Jun 1, 2009
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6,187
Let's not forget that international the internet works the whole day. Not this shaped to hell 12-6 crap we have here.
 

HavocXphere

Honorary Master
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Oct 19, 2007
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31,633
Let's not forget that international the internet works the whole day. Not this shaped to hell 12-6 crap we have here.
Thats true.

Still...I think SA broadband has made decent progress...its at a point where its good enough to not cramp my style. Could be miles better of course...but we're well beyond the 512k + 1GB allowance.
 

Gatecrasher

Executive Member
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Jan 11, 2005
Messages
6,278
Really, an article that claims an average fixed broadband speed of 15.2Mb/s in South Africa is... well, idiotic.

An average should not be an average of the available speeds, it should be weighted by the number of subscribers using those speeds. Since higher speeds typically have lower costs per mbit, giving them the same weighting as the other available speeds will significantly skew the cost per mbit much lower than the prevailing reality for the average consumer. And who can get ADSL without paying for Telkom's double billing line rental? That cost should be included too.

Looking forward to the corrected article.
 

Crystal Web

Crystal Web representative
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May 24, 2014
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3,978
The average price for Telkom’s uncapped DSL offerings – which range between 2Mbps and 40Mbps – is R1,195 ($108).

The average DSL speed is 15.2Mbps, which equates to R78.61 ($7.07) per megabit.
No, guys. This is not how stats work. Correctly weighted and distributed, using the RRP across entry level uncapped products from major ISPs, the average copper-based ADSL uncapped services equate to around R150/Mb/s. You're also comparing against a research paper where the process wasn't replicated according to the research methodology and statistical model adopted by the paper. In addition, one has to be able to provide a quality comparison when offering costing analysis, and entry-level uncapped internet isn't a very good benchmark to use if you're going to be doing global benchmarking and local meta-analysis. By the same token when attempting to make cost comparisons, nor is subsidised capped costing. You actually have to use proper statistical models when offering cost analysis and attempting to benchmark against global standards, and from an ISP's perspective, costing out against the competitive environment in SA, which all ISPs (should) do.

We use 7 data points in our inputs to extrapolate another 8 data points per product per ISP, to perform market related pricing research, which is correctly weighted, distributed and normalised for an accurate picture of the market. You need to be doing something similar if you want to be performing benchmarking and analysis, especially as leaders in the ICT publishing sector. The approach used in the article is not good enough and is misleading.
 

Mike Hoxbig

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Apr 25, 2010
Messages
35,723
If anyone remembers the 512K + 3GB for R900 days then you would know that it's a huge improvement, especially accounting for inflation. We could have progressed faster, but there's no comparison to how it was. I think that the mobile operators actually played a large part in moving us forward...
 
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