South Africa’s worst drought since 1904 – this is what it looks like

chubster

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2007
Messages
830
Why should the people have to initiate communication with the government?

The government should have been doing whatever it could from MONTHS ago, without the people having to try initiate it.

The fact that private citizens are managing to do stuff like sending 2m litres of water etc is actually damning for the government...

I don't want to play the blame game because that is counter productive. Like in any good relationship, communication is key. If proper channels are in place, things can happen much quicker, do you agree?

So if we don't know the answers to these questions, then it seems like there is a need, let me rephrase that, an opportunity for someone, or a group to step up and interface with the government. Like with anything else that needs to be brought attention to. MyBB is one platform. But why is iol and news24 not talking about the government not doing anything? Hence why I also asked, what can the government do right now?

I also had a look at http://helpendehand.co.za/ "Solidariteit". That is a start, but seems very, how should we say it, exclusive to Afrikaans speaking people? If people want help, shouldn't they reach out to more people? One way is to make the other person feel welcome by speaking in a language that they understand. That shows to me a willingness to work together as in the true sense of the meaning "Solidariteit". Or is it pride, that there is humiliation in asking for help from "other" people?
 

Necropolis

Executive Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
8,401
Farming really must suck - not enough or no rain - you're screwed. Too much rain and you're also screwed.
 

Intell1gence

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Nov 5, 2010
Messages
103
that guy and his wood chips has no clue about large scale farming, south african farmers are seen as having some of the best farming and land conservation techniques in the world. i know of farmers being contracted to turn fracking damaged lands into workable soil again, even in russia working with frozen soil..

the guy in the vid has a novel idea, but he's a bit clueless when the scale increases. its a great idea for micro farming thats it. imagine 1 farmer covering his 1500 hectars with woodchips.. what trees??

Have a look at Gabe Brown, he is practising those principles on a large scale:

[video=youtube;GxIyKfWf9kU]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GxIyKfWf9kU[/video]
 

ponder

Honorary Master
Joined
Jan 22, 2005
Messages
87,155
Some already do, a relation of mine is even recognized fairly widely as an expert in companion gardening / farming ... he's also been caught 3 times for growing and selling mary-jane though sooooo ... correlation or causation? lol

I had to google that :eek:
 

ToxicBunny

Oi! Leave me out of this...
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
Messages
95,513
I don't want to play the blame game because that is counter productive. Like in any good relationship, communication is key. If proper channels are in place, things can happen much quicker, do you agree?

So if we don't know the answers to these questions, then it seems like there is a need, let me rephrase that, an opportunity for someone, or a group to step up and interface with the government. Like with anything else that needs to be brought attention to. MyBB is one platform. But why is iol and news24 not talking about the government not doing anything? Hence why I also asked, what can the government do right now?

I also had a look at http://helpendehand.co.za/ "Solidariteit". That is a start, but seems very, how should we say it, exclusive to Afrikaans speaking people? If people want help, shouldn't they reach out to more people? One way is to make the other person feel welcome by speaking in a language that they understand. That shows to me a willingness to work together as in the true sense of the meaning "Solidariteit". Or is it pride, that there is humiliation in asking for help from "other" people?

I will play the blame game, because it is needed. We couldn't avoid the drought, but if government got its head out of its racist rectal cavity it may have been considerably more manageable.

Yes we need to communicate etc etc, but that the citizen initiates it is unacceptable.
 

Intell1gence

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2010
Messages
103
I think it is also helpful to have a look at Masanobu Fukuoka:

[video=youtube;8atbgaiekZI]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8atbgaiekZI[/video]

I think the root of this problem originated with the removing of alien trees on a national scale in order to save water. Yes we will save the underground water by removing all those trees on such a scale, which will benefit those who irrigate from rivers, but those who are dependent on rain will eventually suffer in my opinion.

Remember, trees fill a fundamental role in the formation of local rain. I have seen first hand and beleve that if we remove trees on such a large scale, drought will eventually follow.

We should understand that we are stewards of the earth and thus it is our duty to first look after the soil by covering it. Soil covered with organic matter, such as seen in a forest or grassland, need much less water, have far less wind and water erosion, have far greater microbial life and far fewer weeds than it would otherwise have.

We should strive to create paradise, we have the ability to do so.
 
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ToxicBunny

Oi! Leave me out of this...
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Apr 8, 2006
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95,513
Have a look at the first 10min of the video. I can promise you it will be 10min well spent :)

vimeo.com/28055108

How about a short summary of that, surely it can't be too difficult to put it into a few points?
 

bgotapen

Expert Member
Joined
May 22, 2011
Messages
1,237
If only our farmers would farm using these principles:

[video=vimeo;28055108]https://vimeo.com/28055108[/video]

vimeo.com/28055108


It is funny when people with absolutely no clue of farming comment such utter horse crap. If you knew anything about farming you would know that it isn't possible on the scale of farming that supports massive populations and markets of today.
 

Geoff.D

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Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
20,490
This is an old thread but could not find a more up to date one dealing with the whole country in general.

We took a trip down to Cape Town over the festive season. Spent a night in the Karoo close to Hanover. Things looked really bad there and the talk around the dinner table was full of "when it used to rain here" comments. Walked though the Kriegerspoort dam which was bone dry (16 December 2016).

The Cape is really suffering, gardens are dry and lifeless. (Brackenfell). Helped install a grey water distribution set up for my Mom. Got permission for her to use her sprinkler setup twice a week (95 years old and cannot carry buckets). She now has a special watering permit. BUT then had to fix the setup first ....

Returned through the Karoo again last week, only to find a dramatic change in their circumstances. The place went green literally in a few weeks. The Kriegerspoort dam now has water and many of the local dams are full. The change is incredible to see.

Got back home to find that we had in excess of 400 mm in PTA East while I was away.

Kriegerspoort is the largest privately owned dam in the Karoo.
 

ToxicBunny

Oi! Leave me out of this...
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
Messages
95,513
This is an old thread but could not find a more up to date one dealing with the whole country in general.

We took a trip down to Cape Town over the festive season. Spent a night in the Karoo close to Hanover. Things looked really bad there and the talk around the dinner table was full of "when it used to rain here" comments. Walked though the Kriegerspoort dam which was bone dry (16 December 2016).

The Cape is really suffering, gardens are dry and lifeless. (Brackenfell). Helped install a grey water distribution set up for my Mom. Got permission for her to use her sprinkler setup twice a week (95 years old and cannot carry buckets). She now has a special watering permit. BUT then had to fix the setup first ....

Returned through the Karoo again last week, only to find a dramatic change in their circumstances. The place went green literally in a few weeks. The Kriegerspoort dam now has water and many of the local dams are full. The change is incredible to see.

Got back home to find that we had in excess of 400 mm in PTA East while I was away.

Kriegerspoort is the largest privately owned dam in the Karoo.

Unfortunately the drought hasn't completely broken yet, and the whole country is not getting enough sustained rainfall to make sure we don't end up in the drought conditions again later this year.
 
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