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South Africa to desalinate its own seawater

chromedome

Expert Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2010
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1,030
#6
“We cannot wait until then, and have already implemented solutions to use the Koeberg nuclear reactor to desalinate seawater for its own use, and further plans are underway for increasing this capacity for more general use,” said Maqubela.

How is this possible?
 

c3n0byt3

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2009
Messages
730
#7
“We cannot wait until then, and have already implemented solutions to use the Koeberg nuclear reactor to desalinate seawater for its own use, and further plans are underway for increasing this capacity for more general use,” said Maqubela.

How is this possible?
Which part? Koeberg was designed to desalinate sea water.
This is their only source.
 

Geoff.D

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
7,321
#8
Its a bit of a toss up between bad reporting and a speaker at the conference not actually knowing what he is talking about.
Presumably what the original intention was to say something like "South Africa needs to develop/create is own capacity to desalinate sea water"?

Notwithstanding the locally developed technologies already in place and ready to be scaled up for mass desalination of sea water.
 
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Gordon_R

Expert Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2009
Messages
3,912
#10
Could do with some proofreading, punctuation and editing when they put out press releases:

In the early 2000s the group evaluated over 130 reactor design concepts, to arrive at six rector technologies being the most feasible to achieve the eight technology goals to improve sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection over the current generation of nuclear reactors.
Edit: Bit of a scale difference between
Mossel Bay 15 000 m3/day
and Cape Town requirement of 200-300 000 m3/day.
 
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c3n0byt3

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2009
Messages
730
#11
For anyone interested here are the technologies they are looking at:
https://www.gen-4.org/gif/upload/docs/application/pdf/2014-03/gif-tru2014.pdf

Details on technology, not so much on implementation.
Nothing notable on economic feasibility or sustainability.
I think it's naive of them not to mention the current environment of financing these builds and the potential corruption.
The days of engineering only efforts like this should be over.
 

eg2505

Honorary Master
Joined
Mar 12, 2008
Messages
12,274
#12
I really do think this is a smokescreen for the nuclear deal that will put SA in Debt for many years further....

I mean nuclear deal, expensive, but we will desalinate seawater so free water, yay....
 

f2wohf

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 15, 2014
Messages
14,700
#14
Gotta love the end of this press statement:

Given the important role South Africa plays in leading advanced nuclear reactor research and development, we continue to contribute at the technology forefront through our active participation at GIF to keep abreast of the latest developments in nuclear reactor technology developments globally.
http://inafrica24.com/recent-news/s...-cape-town-south-africa/#sthash.RXyynfDg.dpbs

Important role ?
Leading ?
Contribute at the technology forefront ?

Duh ? :wtf:

SA hasn't been involved in nuclear R&D for ages...
 

furpile

Expert Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
2,523
#15
A major part of Eskom's capacity is unused at night (probably close to 50% I would guess). This directly increases the cost of electricity. Bringing usage closer to 90% will lower their operating cost, and with most desal plants being modular, they can quickly be switched on or off to use whatever excess capacity there is at that stage.
 

Gordon_R

Expert Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2009
Messages
3,912
#16
For anyone interested here are the technologies they are looking at:
https://www.gen-4.org/gif/upload/docs/application/pdf/2014-03/gif-tru2014.pdf

Details on technology, not so much on implementation.
Nothing notable on economic feasibility or sustainability.
I think it's naive of them not to mention the current environment of financing these builds and the potential corruption.
The days of engineering only efforts like this should be over.
Thanks for the link. So, in a 66 page document, there is one sentence which briefly mentions water:

These guidelines form the basis for the software model G4ECONS, a spreadsheet tool used to calculate the levelised unit cost of energy products, including heat and electricity, and, for applications such as hydrogen production or desalination, of non-electrical products (e.g. hydrogen or potable water).
Edit: I'm sure the population of Cape Town would welcome the idea of a nuclear power station generating potable water... /sarcasm
 
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f2wohf

Honorary Master
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Apr 15, 2014
Messages
14,700
#17
Thanks for the link. So, in a 66 page document, there is one sentence which briefly mentions water:



Edit: I'm sure the population of Cape Town would welcome the idea of a nuclear power station generating potable water... /sarcasm
Well spotted !

Can't wait to hear what the people complaining about the cell towers would say about drinking water from a reactor ! :crylaugh:
 

Ockie

Resident Lead Bender
Joined
Feb 16, 2008
Messages
47,881
#19
I'm pretty sure there is still nuke research done at Pelindaba, albeit not on a very large scale.
It is more on the medical side of things. IIRC we are important supplier of isotopes used in medical applications. Pellindaba plays a important role in that. When it comes to power generation, we are not really on the map at all I would say.
 
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