Sriwijaya Air flight SJ182 crash investigation

WollieVerstege

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Good point. If the fall isn't too violent, it will settle into a false-calm. Especially less detectable at night away from city lights.
Thats what happened to Air France 447. Plane went into an aerodynamic stall and pancaked into the ocean. No indication that any passengers on board was aware that the plan was falling from the sky.
 

genetic

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Thats what happened to Air France 447. Plane went into an aerodynamic stall and pancaked into the ocean. No indication that any passengers on board was aware that the plan was falling from the sky.

Highly unlikely. The aircraft literally fell out of the sky from 37,000ft, losing well over 500ft per second with the pilots fighting for control - You'd definitely feel that.

 

Blackhand

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It'll only be a few seconds and it's over.

Not always, depends what went wrong. Full engine failure at high altitude can be a very slow crash.

Another example was when a horizontal stabilizer broke and the plane was stuck flying upside down for a few minutes while pilots struggled to right the plane before it crashed.
 

Brian_G

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I guess in some ways those of us who regularly watched Air Crash Investigation (NatGeo) are as bad as those who daily allow MSM's Covid stories into their heads.

Although the difference is it's actually made me less nervous of flying as ACI is mostly full of facts...
 

WollieVerstege

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Highly unlikely. The aircraft literally fell out of the sky from 37,000ft, losing well over 500ft per second with the pilots fighting for control - You'd definitely feel that.

Yes, but it was a night flight and most would have been asleep. Also no indication of noise from the cabin on the voice recorder if I remember.

In any case, all 3 pilots who were fully awake did not seem to realise that it was happening either. So if the experts could not feel/understand what was going on I doubt Joe Soap would.
 

genetic

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In any case, all 3 pilots who were fully awake did not seem to realise that it was happening either. So if the experts could not feel/understand what was going on I doubt Joe Soap would.

The pilots were getting false readings from their instruments due to frozen pitot tubes. Also, everyone is able to feel inertia via the vestibular system in your ear. It's the same feeling when a plane starts to descend from it's cruising altitude. You know immediately when it happens. It would be very uncomfortable for those onboard.

I suggest you watch the Air Crash Investigation episode on flight 447. A summary of events is explained from 23:21;

 
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WollieVerstege

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The pilots were getting false readings from their instruments due to frozen pitot tubes. Also, everyone is able to feel inertia via the vestibular system in your ear. It's the same feeling when a plane starts to descend from it's cruising altitude. You know immediately when it happens. It would be very uncomfortable for those onboard.

I suggest you watch the Air Crash Investigation episode on flight 447. A summary of events is explained from
Sure, but you seem to ignore what I said and just waffle on based on your own bias. Ughh
 

genetic

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Sure, but you seem to ignore what I said and just waffle on based on your own bias. Ughh

Huh? You said it's unlikely that passengers wouldn't have noticed the plane going down;

Thats what happened to Air France 447. Plane went into an aerodynamic stall and pancaked into the ocean. No indication that any passengers on board was aware that the plan was falling from the sky.

The descent was extreme and would have been extremely uncomfortable for anyone onboard - that would wake anyone up - the Air Crash Investigation episode I posed corroborates the violent descent.

I'm confused. Please explain my bias?
 

koffiejunkie

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Although the difference is it's actually made me less nervous of flying as ACI is mostly full of facts...

Same, watching Air Crash Investigation (and general reading about aviation accidents in general) has taught me how much generally have to go wrong for a plane to crash. The other thing I learned is how much safer the last few generations of aircraft are compared to older ones.

Airbus A340 hasn't had a single fatal crash. A330 (2-engine version of the same aircraft) has had two fatal crashes, both caused by pilot error.

Boeing 777 was fatality free until the Asiana landing short of the runway in San Francisco (pilot error), and the three people who were ejected from the fuselage (the rear broke off) died as a result. Had they worn their seat belts for landing, they'd be alive today. The subsequent two fatal crashes was the one MH aircraft disappearing (very likely pilot suicide) and one being shot down.

These are 30 year and 26 year old aricraft families with millions of service miles. Their safety record is spectacular compared to generations before them.
 

Blackhand

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Same, watching Air Crash Investigation (and general reading about aviation accidents in general) has taught me how much generally have to go wrong for a plane to crash. The other thing I learned is how much safer the last few generations of aircraft are compared to older ones.

Airbus A340 hasn't had a single fatal crash. A330 (2-engine version of the same aircraft) has had two fatal crashes, both caused by pilot error.

Boeing 777 was fatality free until the Asiana landing short of the runway in San Francisco (pilot error), and the three people who were ejected from the fuselage (the rear broke off) died as a result. Had they worn their seat belts for landing, they'd be alive today. The subsequent two fatal crashes was the one MH aircraft disappearing (very likely pilot suicide) and one being shot down.

These are 30 year and 26 year old aricraft families with millions of service miles. Their safety record is spectacular compared to generations before them.

It had the opposite effect on me. I got into quite deep into simming a few years ago and I went down the rabbit hole.
It definitely increased my fear of flying knowing how little it takes to bring an aircraft down. Sort of like seeing behind the curtain. One improperly installed bolt, an unapproved replica part with poor tolerance making it into the spares, a piece of duct tape left on a sensor during routing maintenance etc.

There are rigorous processes to prevent most of these things of course, but complacency gets the best of us.
 

neoprema

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I’m worried about flying again due to these planes having being parked at airports for months doing nothing and suddenly fired up and used. Will they give each and every one a complete and full inspection to make sure nothing broke or degraded while sitting there?
I fly a lot but generally have two fears:
1. The plane will crash while I’m asleep and I’ll never know - which makes it hard for me to sleep on planes
2. Some technician was distracted and forgot to tighten something that slowly but surely comes loose during turbulence.

I can’t begin to imagine how those poor people on this flight must have felt. Thankfully the suffering was probably short.
 

NeonNinja

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I’m worried about flying again due to these planes having being parked at airports for months doing nothing and suddenly fired up and used. Will they give each and every one a complete and full inspection to make sure nothing broke or degraded while sitting there?
I fly a lot but generally have two fears:
1. The plane will crash while I’m asleep and I’ll never know - which makes it hard for me to sleep on planes
2. Some technician was distracted and forgot to tighten something that slowly but surely comes loose during turbulence.

I can’t begin to imagine how those poor people on this flight must have felt. Thankfully the suffering was probably short.
So you'd rather take your chances with a car?
 

Brian_G

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It had the opposite effect on me. I got into quite deep into simming a few years ago and I went down the rabbit hole.
It definitely increased my fear of flying knowing how little it takes to bring an aircraft down. Sort of like seeing behind the curtain. One improperly installed bolt, an unapproved replica part with poor tolerance making it into the spares, a piece of duct tape left on a sensor during routing maintenance etc.

There are rigorous processes to prevent most of these things of course, but complacency gets the best of us.
I’m worried about flying again due to these planes having being parked at airports for months doing nothing and suddenly fired up and used. Will they give each and every one a complete and full inspection to make sure nothing broke or degraded while sitting there?
I fly a lot but generally have two fears:
1. The plane will crash while I’m asleep and I’ll never know - which makes it hard for me to sleep on planes
2. Some technician was distracted and forgot to tighten something that slowly but surely comes loose during turbulence.

I can’t begin to imagine how those poor people on this flight must have felt. Thankfully the suffering was probably short.
What has worked for me is the realisation that with 10 000 flights a day worldwide (if I recall correctly that was the norm before Covid) and so few incidents it really is a very, very safe human transport industry, and ACI also gave me much insight into the technology which made it much less flimsy in my mind.

That said, agree that all the aircraft sitting gathering dust is a new danger, and I still panic badly when flying in a thunderstorm.
 
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