SSEG 2022 Pricing - Cape Town has seen the light?

itareanlnotani

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Seems that Cape Town has finally realised that Solar is not the enemy, and is in fact a good thing.


The new tariffs have removed the onerous daily SSEG fee's, and now seem to actually make a mild amount of sense to feed back to the grid. I suspect that they are keen to have people feed back now - they can make a profit on reselling cheaper power, and it will reduce loadshedding.

Such a change from a year or two back where Solar was evil.

Screen Shot 2022-05-13 at 11.39.52.png


(Figures on the left - 2021. Figures on the right - 2022)
 
There is no registration fee, it is totally free, but if you want to feed in the ami meter is around 12k and an additional meter reading fee of about R130 per month
 
There is no registration fee, it is totally free, but if you want to feed in the ami meter is around 12k and an additional meter reading fee of about R130 per month
What is te R6000 SSEG fee I normally see on the quotations for Cape Town people?
 
CoCT -

As discussed during our site meeting today, we can confirm there are no longer daily service charges associated with the SSEG tariff. There is however a monthly AMI meter reading fee of approximately R90.00.


The current export rate is around R1.00/kWh so in order to break even you will only need to export around 90 units per month, thereafter your consumption is reduced by as much as you wish to export.


The cost of an AMI meter is roughly R10 000.00.


Please advise if you wish to proceed with the current application with the option of no export or resubmit an amended application for exporting excess generation.

CoCT info for a recent install / SSEG application (this month).

So, if you pay extra 90+vat a month + 10k on top for a new meter, you can then get the "benefit" of getting credited for electricity you sell them to the value of however much you use from them.

Still not a great deal, but far better than before.
 
How much can you make with a 50watt solar panel? If I sell the power to CoCT
 
What is te R6000 SSEG fee I normally see on the quotations for Cape Town people?
CoCT requires an Engineers signoff for grid tied installations

This is likely what the 6k fee refers too.


Grid-tied systems:​

A Commissioning Approval Letter will then be issued within 10 working days.
 
CoCT info for a recent install / SSEG application (this month).

So, if you pay extra 90+vat a month + 10k on top for a new meter, you can then get the "benefit" of getting credited for electricity you sell them to the value of however much you use from them.

Still not a great deal, but far better than before.

Wait so I can only sell them as much as I use?

That's stupid.
 
What the City has done now is remove the loophole where you could install a tiny system in order to get better electricity pricing per kWh.

While that was a bit questionable at best cost-wise given the daily fee's, I'm sure some worked out their usage to fit the math.

Now thats gone.

The current math makes a bit more sense now if you want to use the grid as a battery - feed excess to the grid, get credited, then use those credits back in evening or winter.

Ironically, this is exactly what Eskom doesn't want people doing.

Time of Day billing will obviously be the next thing on the agenda, as costs differ for production during the day / night.
 
CoCT info for a recent install / SSEG application (this month).

So, if you pay extra 90+vat a month + 10k on top for a new meter, you can then get the "benefit" of getting credited for electricity you sell them to the value of however much you use from them.

Still not a great deal, but far better than before.
Is this current or what you expect after the annual changes, which I think kick in on 1 July.
 
What the City has done now is remove the loophole where you could install a tiny system in order to get better electricity pricing per kWh.

While that was a bit questionable at best cost-wise given the daily fee's, I'm sure some worked out their usage to fit the math.

Now thats gone.

The current math makes a bit more sense now if you want to use the grid as a battery - feed excess to the grid, get credited, then use those credits back in evening or winter.

Ironically, this is exactly what Eskom doesn't want people doing.

Time of Day billing will obviously be the next thing on the agenda, as costs differ for production during the day / night.
This is a game changer and I would consider it if I can use the grid as a battery. It would also eliminate the need to start off with a big battery and not have wasted pv during the middle of the day when batteries are full.

Time of use billing I'm also OK with if they offer incentives to feed in during peak demand periods. I can then use the grid to charge batteries when rates are low and set my system to feed in from batteries during morning and evening peak if they actually credit my account.

There's a video of the sunsynk doing exactly this automatically in the UK with octopus energy without solar. It checks what the buy and sell rates octopus energy publishes I think via API and depending on how the system is setup, it will use the grid to charge batteries and loads if the prices is below a certain value and if it increases, it will then sell back energy to the grid from batteries.

Octopus energy will actually end up paying the homeowner if you setup the system correctly.

Found the video. If CoCT allows this then I'll go all in.

 
This is a game changer and I would consider it if I can use the grid as a battery. It would also eliminate the need to start off with a big battery and not have wasted pv during the middle of the day when batteries are full.

Time of use billing I'm also OK with if they offer incentives to feed in during peak demand periods. I can then use the grid to charge batteries when rates are low and set my system to feed in from batteries during morning and evening peak if they actually credit my account.

There's a video of the sunsynk doing exactly this automatically in the UK with octopus energy without solar. It checks what the buy and sell rates octopus energy publishes I think via API and depending on how the system is setup, it will use the grid to charge batteries and loads if the prices is below a certain value and if it increases, it will then sell back energy to the grid from batteries.

Octopus energy will actually end up paying the homeowner if you setup the system correctly.

Found the video. If CoCT allows this then I'll go all in.

You'll never make money selling solar to CoCT. Thats one of their rules.
Don't forget you also have to comply with their maximum system size limits if you feed back.

The best you can do is break even (and that doesn't count in the costs that you incur in order to be able to sell them cheap electricity for them to profit off).

Even so, I don't think it's a horrifically bad deal now, as is. You can effectively use the grid as a larger battery.

I have two lines of thought on the new fee's

Thought 1 - It's as a trap.
Don't jump in on signing up as SSEG, as they've got you now, and knowing CoCT it will be impossible to change back to standard prepaid without a ton of hoops. They'll also slowly bring the pricing back up to add more fee's. If you already have a grid connected system with a decent sized battery, this is probably where my line of thinking will be. I'd wait and see. CoCT are (in)famous for adding more and more fee's onto things later. "Temporary fee's" that then never disappear (see water for a good example).

In this scenario - as a worst case you buy units as needed from the grid at normal rates, and don't need to pay them extra to (not) feedback any excess. If you have a decent sized system with battery, and only need grid for 5% of the time, this is your best bet currently.


Thought 2 - It's not a completely terrible deal in some cases.
Sure, you need to pay them an extra 10k+ for an AMI meter. You also need to pay an extra meter reading fee (for a fully remote readable meter - WTF!).
Once you've paid CoCT for the privilege of allowing you to sell them cheap electricity for them to resell at higher rates, you can now use them as a grid sized battery. If you have a grid tied system with a small battery, or no battery, this may make sense. If you have a system with no battery or small battery though - you're at high risk of load shedding. More than likely, you'll feed back excess, then not be able to use it as load shedding.. I'd rather suggest buy more battery when you can...

In this scenario - Any daytime excess generation goes into the grid, and gives you 1/3rd of a unit credit (+-R1 per KW you feedback). Nighttime you use the grid, and get charged the R3 per KW fee (so for every 3KW you feed in, you can use 1KW back. You also have to hope that the grid is actually available when you need it.


---

I'll see if I can find out more details about the new feed-in process. i.e. will any credits from generated electricity cover "fixed" charges, or do those only cover units used. Previous documentation was that you could only get credited up to what you used, so if that is still the case, then its a worse deal than it appears (i.e. you sell >3:1 units, but only get credited 1:1 units)
 
This is a game changer and I would consider it if I can use the grid as a battery. It would also eliminate the need to start off with a big battery and not have wasted pv during the middle of the day when batteries are full.

Time of use billing I'm also OK with if they offer incentives to feed in during peak demand periods. I can then use the grid to charge batteries when rates are low and set my system to feed in from batteries during morning and evening peak if they actually credit my account.

There's a video of the sunsynk doing exactly this automatically in the UK with octopus energy without solar. It checks what the buy and sell rates octopus energy publishes I think via API and depending on how the system is setup, it will use the grid to charge batteries and loads if the prices is below a certain value and if it increases, it will then sell back energy to the grid from batteries.

Octopus energy will actually end up paying the homeowner if you setup the system correctly.

Found the video. If CoCT allows this then I'll go all in.


The rate CoCT is likely to pay you for extra energy will never be more than the lowest time of day price. That type of math would be too hard for Africa.
 
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