Starbucks South Africa to review content filtering on free Wi-Fi

Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Messages
11,793
#2
Being a private business I can understand they can block stuff. But as an ISP that's illegal. Should WiFi free or not fall under similar right to privacy if offering Internet access? Only data amounts and bandwidth should be regulated.
 

waylander

Expert Member
Joined
May 15, 2013
Messages
3,295
#4
Being a private business I can understand they can block stuff. But as an ISP that's illegal. Should WiFi free or not fall under similar right to privacy if offering Internet access? Only data amounts and bandwidth should be regulated.
huh? you agree to their terms when you logon... some places I've been to even force you to install their root CA so they can intercept even encrypted data. It's a free service.
 
Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Messages
11,793
#5
huh? you agree to their terms when you logon... some places I've been to even force you to install their root CA so they can intercept even encrypted data. It's a free service.
I know, and when private companies start regulating the internet will you have a problem then? Eventually when the majority of property is services by private companies such as estates, HOA's etc the end user is no longer ever going to go direct through the ISP but rather the apartment block they moved into's provider.

These are not employees of the company but the company has the right to enact their opinions on them? Next they will block articles/news sources that publish negative things about them.
 

HennieWelkom

Senior Member
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Oct 21, 2018
Messages
658
#6
Jeez, what kind of person surfs porn at a coffee shop, seriously, it is fine to bust a nut, but do it at home where no one is bothered by it.
 

waylander

Expert Member
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May 15, 2013
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3,295
#7
I know, and when private companies start regulating the internet will you have a problem then? Eventually when the majority of property is services by private companies such as estates, HOA's etc the end user is no longer ever going to go direct through the ISP but rather the apartment block they moved into's provider.

These are not employees of the company but the company has the right to enact their opinions on them? Next they will block articles/news sources that publish negative things about them.
We're talking about Starbucks, not an ISP. They sell coffee, and internet is a value add to promote people sticking around in their stores.
 

PsyWulf

Executive Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2006
Messages
8,365
#10
I know, and when private companies start regulating the internet will you have a problem then? Eventually when the majority of property is services by private companies such as estates, HOA's etc the end user is no longer ever going to go direct through the ISP but rather the apartment block they moved into's provider.

These are not employees of the company but the company has the right to enact their opinions on them? Next they will block articles/news sources that publish negative things about them.
You aren't paying,they have a right to place restrictions

Free does not equate unimpeded and unlimited
 

ActivateD

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2004
Messages
1,296
#11
huh? you agree to their terms when you logon... some places I've been to even force you to install their root CA so they can intercept even encrypted data. It's a free service.
Damn that is bad. I would never agree to that even if the service is free.
 

sajunky

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 1, 2010
Messages
13,125
#12
A common excuse to spy on you. It only starts from pretenting to be anti-porn. Testing grounds whether you can react.
 
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