Supplementing household electricity with solar (no batteries)?

Geoff.D

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Just an SCR control circuit that limits the voltage across the element = an apparent drop in w-hr used.

Not sure If I would want one of those installed in my DB though.
 

Sinbad

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Oh and to answer the OP's question...

A Victron multigrid/multiplus 2 inverter is I believe approved for CoCT. However, you'd probably want a 5KVA model to allow the 100A passthrough, as the smaller ones have much lower passthrough currents.
Then with an MPPT and panels, the Victron can invert the DC from the MPPT and blend in grid power to meet demand as needed. Not a cheap solution, but works really well.
You can then tack on a BMS and batteries without needing to buy any more hardware.

The Victron is grid tied, but with anti islanding. So if the grid goes off, it isolates the grid input and can continue to provide AC to the outputs, provided your DC source is powerful enough to supply the load.
 

Geoff.D

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switch to a solar geyser. The ROI is a LOT shorter.

Ja much simpler solution to get rid of the power guzzlers in a household. and gives you hot water independence especially if the council now comes along and wants to play the ripple relay game again, which I understand is what JHB is up to again.
 

signates

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He is still waiting to see what happens when they figure out he is using zero water.
They replaced my water meter 3 times thinking it was faulty as they were getting zero usage. Last guy that was here I told him I'm off grid with water and that was the end of it. Haven't paid any water in just over a year.
 

Geoff.D

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They replaced my water meter 3 times thinking it was faulty as they were getting zero usage. Last guy that was here I told him I'm off grid with water and that was the end of it. Haven't paid any water in just over a year.
But still paying sewerage charges at a rate that the Council now estimates -------
 

signates

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But still paying sewerage charges at a rate that the Council now estimates -------
Nope. They need to find a better way to bill for sewerage than just linking it directly to water usage which is unfair to the consumer. Screenshot_20200121-151115_OneDrive.jpeg
 

qscwbt

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The first 2 question you have to ask yourself.
Am I doing this to be independent from Eskom?
Then Cost or Saving or ROI should not be part of your buying decision.

Am I doing this because I want to save money?

Then solar might still be to expensive. But you still have options.
LED lights
solar geyser
Gas stove
and for power failures generator, battery lights etc

Just make sure you know why you want solar?
 

Gaz{M}

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The name of the device is something like "AC Speed Controller" or something like that. I bought it at Communica (midrand) for about R300. Its a lot less hassle than swapping out the geyser element.
Installed in in the DB between main and geyser, has a little knob that you can 'throttle' which changes how much power the geyser will use (and how long it will take to heat up)
Hope that makes sense
What a neat idea. It's basically a motor speed controller/dimmer using an SCR device. So it reduces the output voltage. Very clever to use for a geyser...and it's so cheap. PLus you can crank it to full if you need more hot water e.g. guests in the house.
 

Geoff.D

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Nope. They need to find a better way to bill for sewerage than just linking it directly to water usage which is unfair to the consumer. View attachment 771780
They are completely asleep! And you are very very lucky! Wait until they catch up with you and start an exercise in backward estimating ......

Your system is clearly based on a charge proportional to water consumption.
 

signates

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They are completely asleep! And you are very very lucky! Wait until they catch up with you and start an exercise in backward estimating ......

Your system is clearly based on a charge proportional to water consumption.
Good luck to them on that. My area has a very high water table with nearly spring water quality. A few properties are running completely off their wells and some have been doing so for over 10 years.
 

Geoff.D

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It has nothing to do with the water source or quality ---- you are getting a service for nothing which means you are bot paying your share of costs to run the service.

The only way to determine IF the percentage used is fair is to install a meter to measure how much water does not end up in the sewer, which is just about ONLY the water used for watering a garden and washing cars. Everything else including the minuscule amount you consume as a human being ends up in the sewer.
 

signates

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I think it's a fair assumption for *most* consumers though. Not perfect yes, but it's going to be a lot harder to meter sewerage than clean water.
Agreed but having a large garden and a pool, with only two people at the time, made my sewerage charge disproportionately higher as half my water usage was not going via the sewer.
 

thechamp

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What did you guys do? I disappear for a couple of minutes and you are now talking about water?
 

signates

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It has nothing to do with the water source or quality ---- you are getting a service for nothing which means you are bot paying your share of costs to run the service.

The only way to determine IF the percentage used is fair is to install a meter to measure how much water does not end up in the sewer, which is just about ONLY the water used for watering a garden and washing cars. Everything else including the minuscule amount you consume as a human being ends up in the sewer.
Not my fault. If they can find a way to bill me correctly for sewerage I will gladly pay.

Edit

The only water going down the sewer is from my toilets which is probably less than 1kl per month. All drains from showers and sinks are diverted to the garden.
 

supersunbird

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The first 2 question you have to ask yourself.
Am I doing this to be independent from Eskom?
Then Cost or Saving or ROI should not be part of your buying decision.

Am I doing this because I want to save money?

Then solar might still be to expensive. But you still have options.
LED lights
solar geyser
Gas stove
and for power failures generator, battery lights etc

Just make sure you know why you want solar?
Lights are 99% LED.

Any gas stove install will require kitchen make over I suspect, given current layout, which will be costly, and the stove not a big contributor to the overall costs I think, and it's not used much when it's dark (except winter).

Solar geyser would need quite a bit of work (piping for placement in an area with sun). A big tree acts for natural cooling on house in summer, no leave in winter means sun heats home. Geyser is in it's shade. I have triple insulated the current geyser.
 
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