Telkom delaying spectrum to maintain its competitive advantage - Vodacom CEO

Jan

Who's the Boss?
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Telkom's big mobile lie

Vodacom CEO Shameel Joosub said Telkom does not want Vodacom and MTN to get more spectrum because it wants to maintain its competitive advantage.

Speaking to The Nielsen Network, Joosub said Telkom had accused Vodacom and MTN of being a duopoly to limit their ability to get additional spectrum.
 

Swa

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Telkom wants more low frequency spectrum they can use where they have mainly high frequency spectrum. How is this preventing Vodacom from getting more high frequency spectrum where they have mainly low frequency spectrum? Also I don't think Telkom is shaking in its boots over Vodacom stating they'll reduce prices by only 50%, of which we already saw the biggest part.
 

Gaz{M}

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Yes, because Telkom is using a 30 year old fibre network today and you had no time to build your own :rolleyes:
 

NoFear

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What if this runs deeper than what Mr SJ eludes to?

Why would Telkom want to halt the spectrum auction? Simple, Telkom has not built the 5G capability on their network, and would probably not want to invest as this capital outlay would be intensive. Alternatively, they are buying time to put the capability in place, so, they need to use this instrument as a tool to enable them to catch up.

Why would a SOE be so against the spectrum auction? Telkom has probably the most valuable LTE spectrum in 2300MHz (2.3Ghz), enabling them to expand their 4G network and offer fixed wireless connectivity. This is off course where the other operators suffer, having to invest more money to refarm spectrum and use capital intensive technology and adaptations to achieve this.

Further, why are we seeing so much competition commission interference in the mobile industry? Government cannot handle the fact that one of its main contributors in the services sector to GDP is not state owned in its entirety, and will do anything in its power to undermine the profitability thereof. This is where Telkom could play a key role in the process, Telkom will always play a price game, which is music to the governments' ears, and in this way place pressure together with organs of state such as comp comm, to shave away at the profits of the non-government owned entities.

People need to understand the lay of the land, so to speak, to understand who plays what role, where and why, and eventually how they fit into the governments plans. Also keep in mind that Telkom's regulatory head, Siyabonga Mahlangu was also the advisor to former Minister Malusi Gigaba - so there could be a potential tie to the greater political play at hand.

All of this spaghetti makes it worthwhile to start unraveling starting with one thread and following it through. Maybe a bit of a mission for the Daily Maverick's investigative journos to dig their teeth into.
 

Happy Days

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/snip

All of this spaghetti makes it worthwhile to start unraveling starting with one thread and following it through. Maybe a bit of a mission for the Daily Maverick's investigative journos to dig their teeth into.
You're on the wrong website. Here we like to speculate and come up with fake conspiracies, not the real thing.
 

Swa

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30,819
What if this runs deeper than what Mr SJ eludes to?

Why would Telkom want to halt the spectrum auction? Simple, Telkom has not built the 5G capability on their network, and would probably not want to invest as this capital outlay would be intensive. Alternatively, they are buying time to put the capability in place, so, they need to use this instrument as a tool to enable them to catch up.

Why would a SOE be so against the spectrum auction? Telkom has probably the most valuable LTE spectrum in 2300MHz (2.3Ghz), enabling them to expand their 4G network and offer fixed wireless connectivity. This is off course where the other operators suffer, having to invest more money to refarm spectrum and use capital intensive technology and adaptations to achieve this.

Further, why are we seeing so much competition commission interference in the mobile industry? Government cannot handle the fact that one of its main contributors in the services sector to GDP is not state owned in its entirety, and will do anything in its power to undermine the profitability thereof. This is where Telkom could play a key role in the process, Telkom will always play a price game, which is music to the governments' ears, and in this way place pressure together with organs of state such as comp comm, to shave away at the profits of the non-government owned entities.

People need to understand the lay of the land, so to speak, to understand who plays what role, where and why, and eventually how they fit into the governments plans. Also keep in mind that Telkom's regulatory head, Siyabonga Mahlangu was also the advisor to former Minister Malusi Gigaba - so there could be a potential tie to the greater political play at hand.

All of this spaghetti makes it worthwhile to start unraveling starting with one thread and following it through. Maybe a bit of a mission for the Daily Maverick's investigative journos to dig their teeth into.
It's the other way around. Telkom would have to do the most refarming as they have the least low frequency spectrum. The current process prejudices them and favours MTN and Vodacom.
 

Benedict A55h0le

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What if this runs deeper than what Mr SJ eludes to?

Why would Telkom want to halt the spectrum auction? Simple, Telkom has not built the 5G capability on their network, and would probably not want to invest as this capital outlay would be intensive. Alternatively, they are buying time to put the capability in place, so, they need to use this instrument as a tool to enable them to catch up.

Why would a SOE be so against the spectrum auction? Telkom has probably the most valuable LTE spectrum in 2300MHz (2.3Ghz), enabling them to expand their 4G network and offer fixed wireless connectivity. This is off course where the other operators suffer, having to invest more money to refarm spectrum and use capital intensive technology and adaptations to achieve this.

Further, why are we seeing so much competition commission interference in the mobile industry? Government cannot handle the fact that one of its main contributors in the services sector to GDP is not state owned in its entirety, and will do anything in its power to undermine the profitability thereof. This is where Telkom could play a key role in the process, Telkom will always play a price game, which is music to the governments' ears, and in this way place pressure together with organs of state such as comp comm, to shave away at the profits of the non-government owned entities.

People need to understand the lay of the land, so to speak, to understand who plays what role, where and why, and eventually how they fit into the governments plans. Also keep in mind that Telkom's regulatory head, Siyabonga Mahlangu was also the advisor to former Minister Malusi Gigaba - so there could be a potential tie to the greater political play at hand.

All of this spaghetti makes it worthwhile to start unraveling starting with one thread and following it through. Maybe a bit of a mission for the Daily Maverick's investigative journos to dig their teeth into.
Guptas and state capture.
 

marine1

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49,140
Sorry buddy everytime you open your mouth I check if my wallet is still there.
Vc screwed us for years with high data and OOB and then came with this effective cost rubbish.
You are all the same. Politicians that earn millions of Rands screwing the public.
 
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