Tesla’s giant battery saved $40 million during its first year, report says

Nod

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Source: https://electrek.co/2018/12/06/tesla-battery-report/
Neoen, the owner of the giant Tesla battery system in South Australia, released a new report for the first full year of operation and revealed that the energy storage system saved about $40 million over the last 12 months.

Tesla’s 100MW/129MWh Powerpack project in South Australia provide the same grid services as peaker plants, but cheaper, quicker, and with zero-emissions, through its battery system.

It is so efficient that it reportedly should have made around $1 million in just a few days in January, but Tesla later complained that they are not being paid correctly because the system doesn’t account for how fast Tesla’s Powerpacks start discharging their power into the grid.

The system is basically a victim of its own efficiency, which the Australian Energy Market Operator confirmed is much more rapid, accurate and valuable than a conventional steam turbine in a report published earlier this year.

The energy storage capacity is managed by Neoen, which operates the adjacent wind farm.

They contracted Aurecon to evaluate the impact of the project and they estimate that the “battery allows annual savings in the wholesale market approaching $40 million by increased competition and removal of 35 MW local FCAS constraint.”

It is particularly impressive when you consider that the massive Tesla Powerpack system cost only $66 million, according to another report from Neoen.
More at the link ...
 

ISP cash cow

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yeah would love to get me one of those Tesla power wall (baby version) and setup at the house.
 

Scooby_Doo

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How long would 100MW battery last if we are in loadshedding lvl 1? Might make sense depending on how much diesel Eskom is burning, but I am not sure on the calculations to determine what or how much storage we would need.

Edit,

Eskom could use cheap (power produced between 10pm and 4am) to charge the batteries and avoid diesel generators all together. Eskom have a budget of R1b for diesel generators, so they could buy a similar solution to what Australia has.

https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/c...ds-r1bn-to-diesel-bill-to-keep-the-lights-on/

But I still do not know how much potential energy a 100 MW battery pack is compared to what Eskom's diesel generators actually produce.
 
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Papa Smurf

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How long would 100MW battery last if we are in loadshedding lvl 1? Might make sense depending on how much diesel Eskom is burning, but I am not sure on the calculations to determine what or how much storage we would need.
One of those will keep my apartment going for a while :thumbsup:
 

DMNknight

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How long would 100MW battery last if we are in loadshedding lvl 1? Might make sense depending on how much diesel Eskom is burning, but I am not sure on the calculations to determine what or how much storage we would need.
It says so right here: Tesla’s 100MW/129MWh Powerpack project in South Australia

129 MWh = 129 hours @ 1 MegaWatt usage
or 1 hour @ 129 MegaWatts usage

Stage 1 load shedding, Eskom tries to save 1000KW or 1MW. Therefore that battery bank will last 129 Hours and 64 hours in Stage 2.
 

Scooby_Doo

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It says so right here: Tesla’s 100MW/129MWh Powerpack project in South Australia

129 MWh = 129 hours @ 1 MegaWatt usage
or 1 hour @ 129 MegaWatts usage

Stage 1 load shedding, Eskom tries to save 1000KW or 1MW. Therefore that battery bank will last 129 Hours and 64 hours in Stage 2.
Then someone tweet Gordan and Eskom to buy one, it feels like a no brainer.

Edit,

At that rate, buy 3 sets and use cheap power over night to charge them, we can delete some of the old power plants. Then we can continue with independent power producers using clean energy to bulk up the system.
 

konfab

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Then someone tweet Gordan and Eskom to buy one, it feels like a no brainer.
Can't do that. Needs to first have a BEE fronting company. Then a local cadre in Eskom needs to liaise with the fronting company in order to facilitate the transaction.
 

DMNknight

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Unfortunately it's 1000mw they are saving not kw...
Sorry quite right:
Eskom needs to shed 1 000 MW to keep the national grid stable. Stage 1 is the least disruptive of the schedules. Your area is likely to be affected by 2-hour blackouts once every second day* (Monday to Saturday between 05:30 and 21:00). Load shedding generally does not take place overnight or on Sundays. *If you live in an Eskom-supplied area in Johannesburg (operated by City Power), you will be load shed for a 4-hour period once every 4 days. Remember to allow for a 30 minute overlap period to allow for start up and switching to different zones.
*corrected* Matter of minutes then.
 

Gaz{M}

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$66 million for 129 MWh is $512k per Mwh =

R7.1m per MWh and Eskom would need 10 of these for each hour of Stage 1 Loadshedding.

So to survive 10 hours of Stage 1: R7.1m x 1000 MWh x 10 hours = R71.6 Billion, so not really viable.
 

ToxicBunny

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$66 million for 129 MWh is $512k per Mwh =

R7.1m per MWh and Eskom would need 10 of these for each hour of Stage 1 Loadshedding.

So to survive 10 hours of Stage 1: R7.1m x 1000 MWh x 10 hours = R71.6 Billion, so not really viable.
They are decidedly not designed for that use case...

They're "peaking" power providers more than anythign else.
 

lsheed_cn

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What is needed is more solar and wind.

More solar so that predictable daytime generation is covered, and we can avoid using storage (mostly hydro).
The hydro can then run in the evening to cover the residential cooking and heating usage bump.
Alternately, Eskom can promote solar hot water heater installs, and promote gas cooking again, and remove that bump altogether.

Distribute Wind will help add more even more generation. It's the cheapest form of generation now, and we are well suited for it.
 
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