Tesla Powerwall and Freedom Won home battery comparison

Its a sad then when a techincal jounalist writes an article comparing two batteries but fails to mention the battery chemistry of the one battery. The MOST import factor that you need to concider when comparing lithium batteries.

Great for stating that Freedom one Li range is LiFEP04 but what material is Tesla using for their cathodes ?

This will determine the expected cycle life and general battery performance.

Its like comparing to cars - saying the one has a petrol engine but never mentioning anywhere in the article that its being compared to a diesel engine car.
 
The victron will allow you to use solar, and switch like a UPS, the tesla does neither.

The Tesla is not solar ready from what I understand? Or was it not communication ready? We looked at a house a few months back that had a Powerall 2 and I remember it needed extra kit but having said that unleess you go for a Victron EasySolar which has a built in MPPT and the Colour Control GX unit, you need more kit to get it working with solar.
 
The Tesla is not solar ready from what I understand? Or was it not communication ready? We looked at a house a few months back that had a Powerall 2 and I remember it needed extra kit but having said that unleess you go for a Victron EasySolar which has a built in MPPT and the Colour Control GX unit, you need more kit to get it working with solar.
afaik, the powerwall has no mppt.
 
One wouldn't you just bolt on panels on the power walls? Is it not simpler doing it that way?
 
The victron will allow you to use solar, and switch like a UPS, the tesla does neither.
Sure and the journalist could've used a non-solar inverter too for the Freedom Won or used a Powerwall Plus which has an MPPT? I think it's an odd comparison also considering the battery chem is different. Feels a bit like comparing 2 products vs 1 product.

Edit: I do note that the Victron doesn't have a MPPT now.
 
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One wouldn't you just bolt on panels on the power walls? Is it not simpler doing it that way?
There are tons of options in terms of power generation in the North American market which is why they sell both with a MPPT inverter and without otherwise you end up with an inverter and an unused MPPT.
 
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One wouldn't you just bolt on panels on the power walls? Is it not simpler doing it that way?

You need an MPPT and the Powerall 2 doesn't have one although the Powerall Plus does.
 
There are tons of options in terms of power generation in the North American market which is why they sell both with a MPPT inverter and without otherwise you end up with an inverter and an unused MPPT.

Yep, one of the original use cases for the Powerwall was to maximise time of use charges, so charge it when electricity is cheap and then use it when electricity is expensive.
 
Yep, one of the original use cases for the Powerwall was to maximise time of use charges, so charge it when electricity is cheap and then use it when electricity is expensive.
Agreed - theres also loads of residential installs with solar installs using micro-inverters & grid-tied without backup simply to save on energy costs.
 
Yep, one of the original use cases for the Powerwall was to maximise time of use charges, so charge it when electricity is cheap and then use it when electricity is expensive.
Eskom wouldn't need to use diesel peakers if Minerals and Energy would allow us to install powerwalls to feed in during peak and recharge later during off peak.
 
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