The average price for broadband in South Africa is of the highest in the world

Swa

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This is bull. No way we can be 7th for entry level. They are taking mobile which is not broadband.
 

j4ck455

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This means that most South Africans pay higher prices for their ADSL, VDSL, and fibre connections than their counterparts in other countries.

Speaking of FTTH pricing, when is Vumatel going to catch a wake up and reduce its prices?

Compared to OpenServe FTTH, Vumatel's pricing is hugely inflated.
 

Lupus

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Speaking of FTTH pricing, when is Vumatel going to catch a wake up and reduce its prices?

Compared to OpenServe FTTH, Vumatel's pricing is hugely inflated.
Weird it seems that the cost of what I've got with Vumatel is a little cheaper then it's openserv counter.
 

Swa

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Weird it seems that the cost of what I've got with Vumatel is a little cheaper then it's openserv counter.
Not if you count their ridiculous activation fee.
 

Swa

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Who says it’s not?
Because the moment wireless is used as broadband it stops being broadband. Also I can use a few kb's for a few cents, so how do you define entry level? It should only be applicable to uncapped.
 

bwana

MyBroadband
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Because the moment wireless is used as broadband it stops being broadband. Also I can use a few kb's for a few cents, so how do you define entry level? It should only be applicable to uncapped.
Why? Broadband is typically defined by speed, not connection type or threshold.
 

Swa

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Why? Broadband is typically defined by speed, not connection type or threshold.
You mean defined by Icasa as 256kbps? Broadband used to have various requirements (uncapped, permanent, etc.) that's been watered down to accommodate wireless over the years. But as soon as people start using it as broadband it stops being broadband. Telkom, Cell C, Rain just a few of various examples.

But my main point remains, how do you define entry level? 1GB? 5GB? 10GB? payg isn't a measure for entry level. So where do you get a true uncapped offer?
 

Johnatan56

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Speaking of FTTH pricing, when is Vumatel going to catch a wake up and reduce its prices?

Compared to OpenServe FTTH, Vumatel's pricing is hugely inflated.
Weird it seems that the cost of what I've got with Vumatel is a little cheaper then it's openserv counter.
Just going with 100Mbps.
Vumatel 100/10 -> R1119, 100/100 -> R1219pm. Note R1725 install fee.
OpenServe 100/50 -> R1499

Comparing the two, the R250pm difference should break even in ~7 months.

This would be different on the lower end, Vumatel starts at 20 so only comparing those.
Vumatel 20/2 -> R809, 20/20 -> R909. Note R1725 install fee.
OpenServe 20/10 -> R999pm.
R90pm difference, about 20 months to break even. Most would probably pick the cheaper package at this end, so R190 difference, so 10 month break even.

Vumatel is actually cheaper. Now if you're factoring in large capped packages, Vumatel doesn't really compete, currently using a 300GB package on OpenServe 100/50 for ~R1050, which is virtually uncapped for my household.

Picked Cool Ideas for comparison due to their (non-existent) FUP.
https://www.cisp.co.za/ftth/vumatel-residential/
https://www.cisp.co.za/ftth/openserve-residential/

Frogfoot (100/100-> R1009) and Octotel (100/25-> R1009, 100/100-> R1219) are both cheaper with Octotel 100 duplex matching Vumatel.
https://www.cisp.co.za/ftth/frogfoot-residential/
https://www.cisp.co.za/ftth/octotel-residential/
 

Lupus

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You mean defined by Icasa as 256kbps? Broadband used to have various requirements (uncapped, permanent, etc.) that's been watered down to accommodate wireless over the years. But as soon as people start using it as broadband it stops being broadband. Telkom, Cell C, Rain just a few of various examples.

But my main point remains, how do you define entry level? 1GB? 5GB? 10GB? payg isn't a measure for entry level. So where do you get a true uncapped offer?

broadband
/ˈbrɔːdband/
noun
noun: broadband
  1. a high-capacity transmission technique using a wide range of frequencies, which enables a large number of messages to be communicated simultaneously.

Just going with 100Mbps.
Vumatel 100/10 -> R1119, 100/100 -> R1219pm. Note R1725 install fee.
OpenServe 100/50 -> R1499

Comparing the two, the R250pm difference should break even in ~7 months.

This would be different on the lower end, Vumatel starts at 20 so only comparing those.
Vumatel 20/2 -> R809, 20/20 -> R909. Note R1725 install fee.
OpenServe 20/10 -> R999pm.
R90pm difference, about 20 months to break even. Most would probably pick the cheaper package at this end, so R190 difference, so 10 month break even.

Vumatel is actually cheaper. Now if you're factoring in large capped packages, Vumatel doesn't really compete, currently using a 300GB package on OpenServe 100/50 for ~R1050, which is virtually uncapped for my household.

Picked Cool Ideas for comparison due to their (non-existent) FUP.
https://www.cisp.co.za/ftth/vumatel-residential/
https://www.cisp.co.za/ftth/openserve-residential/

Frogfoot (100/100-> R1009) and Octotel (100/25-> R1009, 100/100-> R1219) are both cheaper with Octotel 100 duplex matching Vumatel.
https://www.cisp.co.za/ftth/frogfoot-residential/
https://www.cisp.co.za/ftth/octotel-residential/

Yes they might have an installation fee, but how many people actually pay it? I never did my ISP did, most of the ISP's I've seen cover this cost.
 

Swa

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broadband
/ˈbrɔːdband/
noun
noun: broadband
  1. a high-capacity transmission technique using a wide range of frequencies, which enables a large number of messages to be communicated simultaneously.
Used to include high speed consistent permanent connection. Dial up is not broadband no matter how much the mobile operators want it to be.
 

Swa

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Sorry, what I meant was where both have equal download speeds.
And 4Mbps on fiber in this day and age. :sick:
It's a legacy from their Parkhurst days where it was free. They removed that offer but never adjusted their speeds upwards.
 
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