The Home Improvements Thread

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Arzy

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I'm not gonna lie but a real wood top would look way better. Have you also considered concrete form tops?
We discussed that possibility but found it to be impractical in terms of stains and marks.
 

bromster

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What it an average size for kitchen island?
I'll be going to a few showrooms (caesarstone, cemcrete, The concrete corp, etc) this week to check what they have. I'd like to have a gas stove, big sink, and possible storage on the island
Mine is 3m x 1.5m which is about as big as 1 slab allows. I have a 900mm stove and a prep bowl on the island.

I used 20mm stone and bevelled the edge to create the impression of about 40mm thickness.

You'll probably need 2 boards of melamine for the cupboard carcass (R1500), 1 slab for the top (10-15k if you shop around), then 1.5 boards for your cupboard doors (R1500), drawer fronts etc. Plus labour.

Just be sure that any plumbing or electrical conduit for the island is done before you tile the floor. I'd say use 25mm conduit so that there's ample room for your 4mm stove wire plus any plug points you may want. This will save you a headache later on.

IMG_20190517_210026.jpeg
 

Fuma

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Thank you. So around R20k for the Island. The slab is expensive. Eish
 

maumau

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Mine is 3m x 1.5m which is about as big as 1 slab allows. I have a 900mm stove and a prep bowl on the island.

I used 20mm stone and bevelled the edge to create the impression of about 40mm thickness.

You'll probably need 2 boards of melamine for the cupboard carcass (R1500), 1 slab for the top (10-15k if you shop around), then 1.5 boards for your cupboard doors (R1500), drawer fronts etc. Plus labour.

Just be sure that any plumbing or electrical conduit for the island is done before you tile the floor. I'd say use 25mm conduit so that there's ample room for your 4mm stove wire plus any plug points you may want. This will save you a headache later on.

View attachment 659648
Magnifico. Love the white.

What's that round thing on the floor top right with a book on it?
 

GrootBaas

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I need some guidance on building regulations. When I purchased my place it came with a front braai area with a roof structure running up to the front wall on the street.

A few years later I went to the municipality and pulled my building plans. Turns out the braai is indicated on a building plan with the portion of the wall that was raised. Not the roof structure.

Now the roof structure needs to be replaced as it's in a horrible condition. So I was thinking of redoing the whole braai area and raising my wall further.

I'm guessing for pretty much anything like this you need to get approval first (and from what I understand a roof can't come closer than 1m to the front wall, ). But how come I managed to purchase the property with unapproved additions and what is the worst case (and possibilities) should I continue without the necessary approval?

Please don't get aggressive :eek:, really trying to understand here.
 

Lupus

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I need some guidance on building regulations. When I purchased my place it came with a front braai area with a roof structure running up to the front wall on the street.

A few years later I went to the municipality and pulled my building plans. Turns out the braai is indicated on a building plan with the portion of the wall that was raised. Not the roof structure.

Now the roof structure needs to be replaced as it's in a horrible condition. So I was thinking of redoing the whole braai area and raising my wall further.

I'm guessing for pretty much anything like this you need to get approval first (and from what I understand a roof can't come closer than 1m to the front wall, ). But how come I managed to purchase the property with unapproved additions and what is the worst case (and possibilities) should I continue without the necessary approval?

Please don't get aggressive :eek:, really trying to understand here.
Either nothing will happen, or the next person who buys from you wants the plans and you have to get them done.
At worst you'll have to pull the whole thing down.
 

CamiKaze

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What is class 4 screws?
Is Ecowhite better than Amazing white considering the price difference?
Flashings G308 vs. Az200 2.45mm?
What is the better option here?
I need expert advice.

GlobalRoofing
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or


AgriMark
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SAguy

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I need some guidance on building regulations. When I purchased my place it came with a front braai area with a roof structure running up to the front wall on the street.

A few years later I went to the municipality and pulled my building plans. Turns out the braai is indicated on a building plan with the portion of the wall that was raised. Not the roof structure.

Now the roof structure needs to be replaced as it's in a horrible condition. So I was thinking of redoing the whole braai area and raising my wall further.

I'm guessing for pretty much anything like this you need to get approval first (and from what I understand a roof can't come closer than 1m to the front wall, ). But how come I managed to purchase the property with unapproved additions and what is the worst case (and possibilities) should I continue without the necessary approval?

Please don't get aggressive :eek:, really trying to understand here.
I'm currently in a similar position and it's a pain.
I'm having an addition done to my house, but found out when getting plans from council that my awnings aren't on the plan. We only have the place for a year and the awnings were put up two owners ago.

The council planner saw this on google maps and won't even look at my additions until the illegal structures have been addressed. I either need to take them down, or submit plans for them and apply to have the penalty waived. The planner could still decide that I need to pay penalties for the awning, and even then you could still need to make applications for change of land use if you're crossing boundary lines. So it's a mission.

Honestly, if I was in your position and seeing as you may want to redo it anyway - I'd break down whatever is illegal and then submit proper plans for your new structure. Otherwise you first need to apply for admin penalty waiver.

Other peoples experience may differ, but in CPT it's hard core man.
 

alqassam

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I'm currently in a similar position and it's a pain.
I'm having an addition done to my house, but found out when getting plans from council that my awnings aren't on the plan. We only have the place for a year and the awnings were put up two owners ago.

The council planner saw this on google maps and won't even look at my additions until the illegal structures have been addressed. I either need to take them down, or submit plans for them and apply to have the penalty waived. The planner could still decide that I need to pay penalties for the awning, and even then you could still need to make applications for change of land use if you're crossing boundary lines. So it's a mission.

Honestly, if I was in your position and seeing as you may want to redo it anyway - I'd break down whatever is illegal and then submit proper plans for your new structure. Otherwise you first need to apply for admin penalty waiver.

Other peoples experience may differ, but in CPT it's hard core man.
Or just get a council runnner
 

GrootBaas

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Interesting. Problem is the bathrooms have also been changed significantly by previous owners which is not on any plan. Urgh, this can become an expensive exercise if I do it the right way. And yes, it is Cape Town which I also understood is rather intense. Crazy that they monitor satellite images though, that's actually impressive.
 

The_MAC

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Crazy that they monitor satellite images though, that's actually impressive.
They pay for the high resolution ones also, the cost is lower than driving around, plus you can't see the back-yard from the street - it's extra money for them in the form of rates & taxes
 

GrootBaas

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Any idea how the penalties are calculated? And if I can show that I bought the property with those unapproved changes, how easily is the penalty reduced/waived?
 

The_MAC

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Any idea how the penalties are calculated? And if I can show that I bought the property with those unapproved changes, how easily is the penalty reduced/waived?
I think its on a per square meter basis.

The onus is on the owner to have approved plans, even if you bought the house like that, sucks, but true
 

SAguy

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I think its on a per square meter basis.

The onus is on the owner to have approved plans, even if you bought the house like that, sucks, but true
Yeah, I think for mine the maximum penalty is something like R100k.
In all likelihood I won't need to pay anything, but theoretically they could.
Lesson learnt for the next time I buy a house, will make sure it's added as a condition of the purchase agreement.
 

ToxicBunny

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They pay for the high resolution ones also, the cost is lower than driving around, plus you can't see the back-yard from the street - it's extra money for them in the form of rates & taxes
If its anything like eThekwini, they pay for the high-res satellite images, as well as have a plane flying around every few years taking even higher res photos, since even the high-res satellite images have a limited resolution (probably around 0.5m - 1m per pixel)
 
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