The Hyundai i20 Thread

HBee

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:( what's wrong with our market?

Yes I am referring to the i10 Grand, but it loosely fits all models in South Africa. If you look at any picture of the i10 Grand, be it the European model or the bigger one they make in India, and available here, the pictures all have DLR's, 15 inch rims, and that black teardrop strip (door garnish) running along the side of the car. These elements just make the car pop, and without it the car just does not look as good. The top of the range model going for 160K has non of this (not even as an option).

So using the above as a yardstick and once again seeing the items I have just described missing in the local i10 in the picture of the i20, it stands to reason that the i20 we will be getting, will probably have them missing as well.
 

PhireSide

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It looks very VW-like, can't say I like it, and I also see a bit of the Audi A1 (blegh) in there too.

But I guess many cars are moving towards a certain 'look' so good on Hyundai for keeping with the trend.
 

HeftyCrab

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Kia and Hyundai have plenty of turbo petrol models available but the problem is that most of them don't make it to South Africa for some reason. :crying:
- Hyundai Veloster 1.6T
- Hyundai Sonata 2.0T
- Kia Optima 2.0T
- Kia Forte5 (Cerato) 1.6T
- Kia Sorento 2.0T
Plenty more I'm not going to list.

Only the Kia Koup 1.6 GDI (Turbo) has made it to South Africa.

I drive a Kia and my next car will be turbo charged so if Kia, Hyundai and Toyota don't have that option when I'm looking, they won't be on the short list.

Its price. I know someone at Hyundai and they have been looking at bringing in the Veloster turbo for quite some time, but they said it would be too expensive when it gets here(probably for the segment and competition). This was a few months ago so dont know whats up now.
 

Paul_S

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Its price. I know someone at Hyundai and they have been looking at bringing in the Veloster turbo for quite some time, but they said it would be too expensive when it gets here(probably for the segment and competition). This was a few months ago so dont know whats up now.

The problem is most other manufacturers are going forced induction for lower emissions, lower fuel consumption and more power so if Kia, Hyundai, Toyota, etc. don't keep up they will eventually start losing market share.

After Hyundai and Kia's last price hikes I'd rather look at getting a used BMW 320i or 320d when I'm in the market.
 
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per4mer

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The back looks similar to the current i30 and the front to the current i20 but just stretched.

Id rather not recommend anyone to buy a hyundai especially in auto.

Its giving me alot of problems like rattling noise and squeaking noise and if you go buy 1 you not going get a good resale value after a few years.

My i20( facelift) is driven about 14000kms 2013 model and they offered me 130k.
 

Paul_S

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... and if you go buy 1 you not going get a good resale value after a few years.

My i20( facelift) is driven about 14000kms 2013 model and they offered me 130k.

You're complaining because the vehicle lost 22% of it's value after a year?
That's not bad considering you normally lose 15%+ on any brand as soon as you drive it off the showroom floor.
Some brand's models like Mercedes lose over 30% of their value within the first year.
 
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Gnome

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The problem is most other manufacturers are going forced induction for lower emissions, lower fuel consumption and more power so if Kia, Hyundai, Toyota, etc. don't keep up they will eventually start losing market share

That is purely opinion. Some european car companies are going forced induction, great for them.

Forced induction runs much closer to tolerances and also happens to have twice the amount of parts.

In terms of naturally aspirated, Hyundai's latest generation engines are up to par with the european counter parts in terms of engine features. The difference being we actually get those engines here. I can get an entry level Hyundai with an excellent quality NA engine in SA for the same price VW/Opel/etc. are offering engines from 2 generations ago in old chassis.

To say bluntly that turbo charged engines are the future is really naive. The complexity and reliability of those engines isn't something you can simply engineer around. Your after sales costs also increase due to the higher part count. You need tool factories to deal with the complexity required to build them.
 

Paul_S

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That is purely opinion. Some european car companies are going forced induction, great for them.

To say bluntly that turbo charged engines are the future is really naive.

Normally aspirated diesels were common 30 years ago.
Try find a normally aspirated diesel under 4 litre capacity now from either the European or Japanese manufacturers.
Even Mahindra use turbo diesels now.

Petrol engines will go the same route IMO.
 

Gnome

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Normally aspirated diesels were common 30 years ago.
Try find a normally aspirated diesel under 4 litre capacity now from either the European or Japanese manufacturers.
Even Mahindra use turbo diesels now.

Petrol engines will go the same route IMO.

Except that turbo petrol and turbo diesel cars have been around for the same amount of time.

Diesel & Petrol engines operate on completely different set of principles.

In fact diesel cycle and Otto cycle (Petrol) were invented by completely different people.

Turbo chargers have zero drawbacks for a diesel engine. They increase the air charge temperature, and increase the chance of auto ignition both a huge win on a diesel engine. Both a huge negative on a petrol engine.

You are comparing an inherently safe design with a design where precision engineering is required to make it safe.

NA petrol won't go away any time soon. I think electric vehicles are likely to jump into the mainstream market before NA engines will truly die out.
 
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Quantum Theory

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In terms of naturally aspirated, Hyundai's latest generation engines are up to par with the european counter parts in terms of engine features. The difference being we actually get those engines here. I can get an entry level Hyundai with an excellent quality NA engine in SA for the same price VW/Opel/etc. are offering engines from 2 generations ago in old chassis.

What? The current i20 1.4 Fluid Manual is R192k. For the same price you can get a 1.2 TSI Polo Trendline. I can continue with examples from all other segments, where the Koreans are often more expensive these days.
 

Gnome

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What? The current i20 1.4 Fluid Manual is R192k. For the same price you can get a 1.2 TSI Polo Trendline. I can continue with examples from all other segments, where the Koreans are often more expensive these days.

I'm not advocating for Hyundai, that is overpriced, no doubt about it.

I couldn't find the 1.2 TSI, I'm guessing it is the model VW advertises as 66kW?

I wouldn't buy either of those cars. The VW warranty becomes expensive really quickly.
 

grim

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Did the designer just have a piece of tracing paper and a couple of pictures of VW/AUDI cars?

Still won't touch Korean cars with a barge pole
 
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