The No. 1 reason companies are rejecting your CV

Solarion

Honorary Master
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Nov 14, 2012
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20,381
Just some advice.

At the top of your CV, bullet point all your main skills and how many years proficiency. Saves the head developer from trawling through 3 or 4 pages of your CV.

Then in each job you had, expand a little more on what you did with bullet points. 3 or 4 points will suffice.

So in short, you say little about yourself, your skills and then your qualifications all on the first page.
 

Jase

Executive Member
Joined
May 31, 2007
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5,757
Just some advice.

At the top of your CV, bullet point all your main skills and how many years proficiency. Saves the head developer from trawling through 3 or 4 pages of your CV.

Then in each job you had, expand a little more on what you did with bullet points. 3 or 4 points will suffice.

So in short, you say little about yourself, your skills and then your qualifications all on the first page.

I was chatting to a friend who recently started working in the UK. The advice given was similar to yours i.e. Summarise your skills and experience, use 'power words' that are relative to your field and keep it short and to the point for your work experience.

Apparently, a number of companies use algorithm software to scan and narrow down CV's that are then further reviewed by the recruiter.

A bit O/T but the worst for me are online job adverts that require you to fill out a web based CV as well as submit a copy. It gets tedious after a while especially once you work experience, job diversity and various training courses grows.
 

Moosedrool

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May 24, 2012
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8,302
I was chatting to a friend who recently started working in the UK. The advice given was similar to yours i.e. Summarise your skills and experience, use 'power words' that are relative to your field and keep it short and to the point for your work experience.

Apparently, a number of companies use algorithm software to scan and narrow down CV's that are then further reviewed by the recruiter.

A bit O/T but the worst for me are online job adverts that require you to fill out a web based CV as well as submit a copy. It gets tedious after a while especially once you work experience, job diversity and various training courses grows.

Also hate filling out web based CV's, skills matrix's etc... But in the end I do look at the company's perspective and this approach is already a bit of a filter rather than receiving hundreds of applications via e-mail with dumb or even no cover letters or details about the applicant him or herself.
 

Jase

Executive Member
Joined
May 31, 2007
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5,757
Also hate filling out web based CV's, skills matrix's etc... But in the end I do look at the company's perspective and this approach is already a bit of a filter rather than receiving hundreds of applications via e-mail with dumb or even no cover letters or details about the applicant him or herself.

Good point raised. This reminds me of LinkedIn where a recruiter posts an ad with an email address and a few hundred (or more) 'interested' applicants reply to the ad with 'interested, contact me at blabla@xmail.xx'.
 

Solarion

Honorary Master
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The recruiter shouldn't give you the run around, but when I have used those websites before, where you have to fill everything in, I felt like I was having to pull a couple of teeth just to be noticed.

I think Jobmail used to be like that.

Also hate filling out web based CV's, skills matrix's etc... But in the end I do look at the company's perspective and this approach is already a bit of a filter rather than receiving hundreds of applications via e-mail with dumb or even no cover letters or details about the applicant him or herself.

As head developer I sometimes have CV's across my desk. I'll say this, if it looks neat and too the point, and if I can make out what the person's skills are in about 30 seconds, then I will keep it to one side. If the C.V looks like a Wilbur Smith novel then it goes straight in the bin, immediately.

I will then give them a quick phone call and ask a couple of questions, get straight to the point.

This is why a short summary at the top is so vital.

Edit: No diss on Wilbur Smith he's an awesome writer :)
 
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Dolby

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Jan 31, 2005
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28,405
They should feature an article especially for recruiters on their No 1 mistake: No salary range! Not including this wastes everybody's time ...

Another thing that annoyed me is the amount of times we have to submit the CV. I applied for a position the other day on LinkedIn by submitting my CV. They then send an email asking the same information - takes another 30 minutes. When I get to their office, yet another form with almost identical information to the first 2 times.

And final thing is that I've seen a non negotiable degree required. While I understand the reasoning, 10 years experience doing something and being involved in the running of the business should at least be looked into

As I'm desperate fora job, I need to grit my teeth and go through the application ... but in my eyes, a CV and cover letter should suffice.
 

Jase

Executive Member
Joined
May 31, 2007
Messages
5,757
They should feature an article especially for recruiters on their No 1 mistake: No salary range! Not including this wastes everybody's time ...

Another thing that annoyed me is the amount of times we have to submit the CV. I applied for a position the other day on LinkedIn by submitting my CV. They then send an email asking the same information - takes another 30 minutes. When I get to their office, yet another form with almost identical information to the first 2 times.

And final thing is that I've seen a non negotiable degree required. While I understand the reasoning, 10 years experience doing something and being involved in the running of the business should at least be looked into

As I'm desperate fora job, I need to grit my teeth and go through the application ... but in my eyes, a CV and cover letter should suffice.

I've noticed that this is so prevalent here in SA. Overseas positions (UK / EU / Middle East) tend to advertise salary ranges.
 

krycor

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
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18,492
It's because people expect the max of the range when applying and get annoyed with told that its current X company recruitment policy value up.

Ranges are generally the way to know if u need to apply (if you already beyond their budget then why? Apply and expect more)
 

Solarion

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Nov 14, 2012
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In my experience, you will start at the bottom of the range during your first 3 - 6 months probation. Only after that will they increase it, assuming you last that long. It's a better incentive for you to do over and above average. It's really just carrot dangling at the end of the day.
 

Other Pineapple Smurf

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Jun 21, 2008
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I've only been to two interviews in 12 years where they read my CV before the interview. Thats why I agree with @Solarion as the interviewer often only reads my CV during the interview.
 
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