The racism related news articles thread

Sollie

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https://globalvoices.org/2018/09/21...urant-leads-to-debate-about-racism-in-angola/
The alleged violent eviction of a journalist from an upscale restaurant in Luanda has caused an online controversy, leading to debates about racism and discrimination in Angola.


On 26 August, journalist and activist Simão Hossi visited the Café Del Mar restaurant with a group of friends. On the instructions of the managers, two employees followed Hossi when he was on his way to the restroom. The employees then allegedly assaulted and expelled him from the restaurant with the excuse that Hossi was poorly dressed.
 

schumi

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‘Good Morning, Mlungu’ sees three metro police officers fired

Durban - A metro police officer and his two co-workers got fired for greeting his boss with “Good morning, mlungu,” while the boss who referred to him by the k-word got a slap on the wrist.

However, both parties have denied using the derogatory words and the matter was this week taken on appeal. The outcome is expected on Tuesday.

Constable Siyabonga Mzobe, 38, was found guilty of calling Captain Shane Spilsbury an mlungu, while Sphamandla Madida, 38, and Mthembeni Mtshali, 30, were found guilty of making a false statement on an affidavit, denying that the captain was referred to as an “mlungu” and for testifying he had used the k-word.

The matter dates to 2016 when a complaint was laid against Spilsbury for allegedly using the k-word. He opened a counter claim and alleged he was called “mlungu”, while at the Queensburgh police station.

The internal disciplinary charge sheet found that the word “mlungu” was derogatory.

South African Municipal Workers Union (Samwu) representative Joe Mabaso claimed that proper procedures were not followed in the disciplinary hearing against the dismissed officers.
More at : https://www.iol.co.za/sunday-tribun...es-three-metro-police-officers-fired-17194381
 

Swa

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What's a 'mlungu'?

Never mind seems to mean white person. So I guess it depends on the context.
 
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surface

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Then why did the gentleman above get fired? Who reported him?
Looks like u word > k word now. I think boss won in this case - kind of natural in internal disciplinary hearing?

"Durban - A metro police officer and his two co-workers got fired for greeting his boss with “Good morning, mlungu,” while the boss who referred to him by the k-word got a slap on the wrist. "

I frequently go back to learning isiZulu (and back to square each time) but this is a great reference for me. I had no idea this was an insult.
https://isizulu.net/?umLungu
 

ForceFate

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Looks like u word > k word now. I think boss won in this case - kind of natural in internal disciplinary hearing?

"Durban - A metro police officer and his two co-workers got fired for greeting his boss with “Good morning, mlungu,” while the boss who referred to him by the k-word got a slap on the wrist. "

I frequently go back to learning isiZulu (and back to square each time) but this is a great reference for me. I had no idea this was an insult.
https://isizulu.net/?umLungu
I'm no native speaker of the language. Though I hardly use the word myself, I've been called mlungu/lekgowa multiple times before (I'm black).

Native language speakers don't seem to have issues with the word and use it liberally. It's not uncommon to hear "mlungu wam..." in the workplace.
 

thechamp

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Looks like u word > k word now. I think boss won in this case - kind of natural in internal disciplinary hearing?

"Durban - A metro police officer and his two co-workers got fired for greeting his boss with “Good morning, mlungu,” while the boss who referred to him by the k-word got a slap on the wrist. "

I frequently go back to learning isiZulu (and back to square each time) but this is a great reference for me. I had no idea this was an insult.
https://isizulu.net/?umLungu
Context makes all the difference, like that "swart man thread" and the way it was used. Mlungu can mean a white person or boss, all depends on the context, from first impressions it meant boss in this instance although since the guys have been fired maybe there was more to it than that. I would certainly not go around calling my white boss Mlungu.
 

Mephisto_Helix

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Wouldn't have been fired if it simply meant white man. So either it means something insulting in a certain context (which some have been saying for ages), or the feels being hurt by words is getting really pathetic ......
 

Swa

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I'm no native speaker of the language. Though I hardly use the word myself, I've been called mlungu/lekgowa multiple times before (I'm black).

Native language speakers don't seem to have issues with the word and use it liberally. It's not uncommon to hear "mlungu wam..." in the workplace.
Yet the same can be said of other words. It's the same old double standard.

Wouldn't have been fired if it simply meant white man. So either it means something insulting in a certain context (which some have been saying for ages), or the feels being hurt by words is getting really pathetic ......
You don't greet someone by saying good morning white man without meaning something by it. Either way I don't really care and think people are overly sensitive but since black people started this war on freedom of speech we should be taking it to the logical extreme just to be fair. Fire all 3 of them.
 

BBSA

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Yet the same can be said of other words. It's the same old double standard.


You don't greet someone by saying good morning white man without meaning something by it. Either way I don't really care and think people are overly sensitive but since black people started this war on freedom of speech we should be taking it to the logical extreme just to be fair. Fire all 3 of them.
No, let's not play this game. I don't want a socity where you constantly have to walk on eags.
 

ponder

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I'm no native speaker of the language. Though I hardly use the word myself, I've been called mlungu/lekgowa multiple times before (I'm black).

Native language speakers don't seem to have issues with the word and use it liberally. It's not uncommon to hear "mlungu wam..." in the workplace.
I honestly don't know any more. Previously I though it can't be bad. Weird thing is I've never been addressed as mlungu by older people, only young kids at primary school level witch you ignore. Thing is I've seen a principal reprimand kids before, asked why and he said they being disrespectful. Either way sticks and stones and all that stuff...
 

thechamp

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I honestly don't know any more. Previously I though it can't be bad. Weird thing is I've never been addressed as mlungu by older people, only young kids at primary school level witch you ignore. Thing is I've seen a principal reprimand kids before, asked why and he said they being disrespectful. Either way sticks and stones and all that stuff...
Truth be told, it will be nearly impossible for a random stranger you meet on the street to call you Mlungu, precisely because you are a Mlungu IIRC? I will even say that the next time a fully grown person calls you Mlungu it won't be in a pleasant meeting.

I a black man stands a better chance of being called Mlungu by the car guards at the mall or the beggars at the traffic lights. There has to be some relationship first before any black person can be brave enough to refer to any white person as Mlungu, it is not very far fetched to imagine that somewhere out there there thre is some black person who is on such good terms with their white Boss that they can refer to him as Mlungu.
 

ponder

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I will even say that the next time a fully grown person calls you Mlungu it won't be in a pleasant meeting.
You are correct there, the one or two occasions I recall it was snide & sarcastic. The intention was was not good, so you ignored it.

I suppose like all words it's harmless until used in a negative context.
 
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