The Workout and Fitness Thread

syntax

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Been doing HIIT classes at F45, really kicks my butt. Being 6'3" puts a lot of strain on knees and ankles, but over time hopefully I get stronger. I would feel a lot better if I was consistent about stretching daily, it's just hard to motivate myself to stretch though.

Did a chilled 10k run in an hour yesterday evening though, so feeling good today.
I honestly wish I had done more stretching when I was younger, seems like now if I dont stretch for a few days my body locks up and hates me
 

SAguy

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I honestly wish I had done more stretching when I was younger, seems like now if I dont stretch for a few days my body locks up and hates me
I'm no biokineticist, but I'm sure the majority of injuries could be prevented if stretching was part of our workout routines. Over the years I've had plantar fasciitis, perennial tendonitis and quadriceps tendonitis injuries... all of which could have been avoided I'm sure if I was more flexible.
 

BrendanSmurf

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Yeah I'm really poor with stretching.. and general warming up tbh, although I'm much better now.

Need to get my cardio up again. I'm really not a fan but I feel physically better after a run or cycle on my days off from weights.

The reps / weight thing is interesting. I definitely see more muscle growth operating in the 10-15 rep range in my years of weight training. Funny though that some of my muscle groups seem to prefer even higher reps... Like the smaller muscle groups. Doing 4 sets of 20 reps (moderate weight) Meadows rows but lifting higher to the chest has blown out my rear delts. Normally I don't feel them, they just get tired. My whole upper back was pumped like crazy (for me ;))

For bench and squats, my body seems to like going 4 sets of 8 heavy (for me) and then later in the same session going lighter and pushing another 2 or 3 sets (normally goes 15, 12 and if I can get another, 8 or 10.)

If I leave it at 4 sets of 8 my strength builds but I don't see growth.

Basing this on my training for past 17 odd years.
 

Meister-Man

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For bench and squats, my body seems to like going 4 sets of 8 heavy (for me) and then later in the same session going lighter and pushing another 2 or 3 sets (normally goes 15, 12 and if I can get another, 8 or 10.)

If I leave it at 4 sets of 8 my strength builds but I don't see growth.

In this example you are noticing a difference because of the extra volume. You're going from doing 4 sets to doing 6 or 7 sets. Not because of the rep range.
 

InvisibleJim

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Resorted to this again because of weather and time constraints. Hope the jump rope will have some sort of crossover benefit for my trail run on Sunday :)
 

Sensorei

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The literature I've read and personal experience tends to lean towards medium rep range at not the heaviest weights is better for "body building"
Heavy lifting at lower rep range is better for strength.

However with all of this I just tend to focus on actually contracting and extending the right muscles with them being loaded as much as possible without other supporting muscles joining in.
Probably the last year I have not lifted particularly heavy and instead done higher reps, focused alot on form, slowed down my reps and I have grown significantly. This is also injury avoidance my side, I just cant afford to get injured at this point, it takes too damn long to recover
I've gotten the best results both aesthetically and strengthwise by incorporating powerlifting lower rep training for the big 3 compound movements - bench, deadlifts, squats along with doing bodybuilding higher volume training with focus on full range of motion, time under tension and the PUMP for everything else. Usually in the same workouts.

I will do a 6-8 week powerlifting program about twice a year and then I drop the weights down considerably for a month or so. I've gained a lot more size even up to the ripe age of 40 because the strength gained through powerlifting transfers to being able to do heavier weights with high rep ranges as well.

Like you said slowing down the reps, specifically the eccentric part of the lift does wonders for growth. Especially with full range of motion. Plus less injuries .
 

syntax

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I've gotten the best results both aesthetically and strengthwise by incorporating powerlifting lower rep training for the big 3 compound movements - bench, deadlifts, squats along with doing bodybuilding higher volume training with focus on full range of motion, time under tension and the PUMP for everything else. Usually in the same workouts.

I will do a 6-8 week powerlifting program about twice a year and then I drop the weights down considerably for a month or so. I've gained a lot more size even up to the ripe age of 40 because the strength gained through powerlifting transfers to being able to do heavier weights with high rep ranges as well.

Like you said slowing down the reps, specifically the eccentric part of the lift does wonders for growth. Especially with full range of motion. Plus less injuries .

I wish I got the benefit everyone else does out of deadlifts. Ive been to powerlifting coaches to try get it right but it just seems to do more damage than good for me. Trap bar deadlifts are ok but dont give as much range of motion.
Farmers walks have become a regular thing for me and that has made on overall difference to my "power". It isnt anything specific but I've noticed a difference since doing them
 

Sensorei

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I wish I got the benefit everyone else does out of deadlifts. Ive been to powerlifting coaches to try get it right but it just seems to do more damage than good for me. Trap bar deadlifts are ok but dont give as much range of motion.
Farmers walks have become a regular thing for me and that has made on overall difference to my "power". It isnt anything specific but I've noticed a difference since doing them
Maybe your Ape index (yes that's a thing lol) is just not great for deadlifts, but good for benchpress? Shorter arms relative to your legs?

Farmers walk is a brilliant full body exercise, which is why most people avoid them. They want the gain without the pain.
 

syntax

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Maybe your Ape index (yes that's a thing lol) is just not great for deadlifts, but good for benchpress? Shorter arms relative to your legs?

Farmers walk is a brilliant full body exercise, which is why most people avoid them. They want the gain without the pain.

good grief i learn things daily. Sadly my ape index is pretty darn close to 1. But my body proportions are somewhat odd so it may have something to do with this.
I was hanging onto this as an excuse to not do deadlifts.....will look for something else!

As for the farmers walk, the trap bar i got during initial lockdown to try workout legs. I ended up using it for tons of back and then discovered the dreaded walk. Grip and general strength has gotten pretty darn good from it. Such an underrated exercise
 

Sensorei

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good grief i learn things daily. Sadly my ape index is pretty darn close to 1. But my body proportions are somewhat odd so it may have something to do with this.
I was hanging onto this as an excuse to not do deadlifts.....will look for something else!

As for the farmers walk, the trap bar i got during initial lockdown to try workout legs. I ended up using it for tons of back and then discovered the dreaded walk. Grip and general strength has gotten pretty darn good from it. Such an underrated exercise
With a normal ape index if you've got longer femurs then your glutes are probably your weakness, since you are more horizontal to the ground than the average person when pulling off the ground. Your deadlifts will be more hips and glutes than back dominant, which would make you more likely to have a sticking point when you get the bar to your knees. Sumo or wider stance would be easier.
 
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BrendanSmurf

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Did squats this afternoon... Only 100kgs (all the weights I've got). My kids have to lift the the bar onto my shoulders while I'm sitting, with 60kgs on the bar. I then stand up and they stack the rest on.

Anyway, did 4x12, then immediately after 4th set they took off 40kg and I did 17 slowish reps... Was utterly gassed after that!

Enjoyed it... At least, enjoyed how effective it felt.

Did Romanian deadlifts after, and then those hamstring exercises kneeling on the floor with my son holding my ankles down...

Been eating a lot better, and could feel it in the session.
 

BrendanSmurf

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I can only fit 40kgs each on my dumbells, going to try the farmers walk... Do you guys use straps?

I don't use straps when I dumbell row or shrug 40kg, but if I'm going to walk any distance I think my grip might be the weak point.
 

syntax

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I can only fit 40kgs each on my dumbells, going to try the farmers walk... Do you guys use straps?

I don't use straps when I dumbell row or shrug 40kg, but if I'm going to walk any distance I think my grip might be the weak point.

I dont use straps. My grip is definitely a weak point but trying to fix that
 

Meister-Man

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Did squats this afternoon... Only 100kgs (all the weights I've got). My kids have to lift the the bar onto my shoulders while I'm sitting, with 60kgs on the bar. I then stand up and they stack the rest on.

Anyway, did 4x12, then immediately after 4th set they took off 40kg and I did 17 slowish reps... Was utterly gassed after that!

Enjoyed it... At least, enjoyed how effective it felt.

Did Romanian deadlifts after, and then those hamstring exercises kneeling on the floor with my son holding my ankles down...

Been eating a lot better, and could feel it in the session.

Nice job on doing the best with what you've got .
 

InvisibleJim

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So seeing as the topic of getting back into exercise was raised in the working at home thread the other day, here are some top tips for starting or getting back into exercise :)

  • Get the all clear from your doctor - particularly important if you have pre-existing condition or injury, are over 45, are unused to strenuous activity etc.
  • Don't worry about it, just start - very easy to find a reason not to do anything. It's very easy to feel that health and fitness is for other people - ripped dudes and gym bunnies on Insta, that it's impossible for you. Not true. Journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. It doesn't have to be pretty, it doesn't have to be perfect but you will find that you can go very quickly go beyond what you thought possible once you overcome your own insincere objections and take that
  • More is not necessarily more - don't try to do too much, too hard, too soon. We all start from a different place and the start is always the baseline or foundation and everyone also needs adequate recovery. Two to 3 dedicated workouts per week is enough for a good general level of health and fitness. You don't have to workout every day or max intensity every time. Set realistic, incremental goals.
  • Take day to day opportunities to move - take the stairs rather than the lift, walk to the shops instead of driving, go window shopping round the mall. Move slowly often. Get your steps in.
  • Keep Hydrated - most people wander around permanently dehydrated. Take a little water often.
  • Sort your diet - you can't out train a bad diet - for weight loss or other goals.
  • Make it a habit, make it a priority - When you should be working out you work out. Sometimes life happens but be strict on yourself on this.
  • Make it a journey, not a destination - progression, continuous improvement
  • Share the journey - community is very powerful - participate online, join a class, train with a friend. T.E.A.M - Together Everyone Achieves More (OK, I understand if y'all want to b****slap me for that one)
  • You don't need to spend a lot of money to get started - you can exercise effectively with bodyweight exercises and no expensive equipment or supplements. If you wanted to spend money as a beginner, I would tend to recommend joining a class or maybe a few sessions with a personal trainer rather buying expensive gadgets or joining a gym - you can invest more in the aspects of fitness that are important to you as your journey progresses.

I think that's more than enough for now. Please feel free to comment, elaborate, add or criticise as you see fit but I hope this is useful to some.

Stay strong :)
 
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