Toyota SA's "Baby Fortuner" aka Toyota Rush

FiestaST

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Toyota are a bunch of misers, why didn't the use the 1.6 from the Quest? With 90kW and 154Nm it would have been more than equal to the task.
Read the Wiki entry. New Rush is a 3rd gen Terios that came out late last year.

Cost would been prohibitive & Daihatsu doesn’t really do “big” engines.
 

FiestaST

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DRIVEN: TOYOTA RUSH 1,5 MT

PORT ELIZABETH – Okay, let’s get this out of the way nice and early: I won’t be making any Rush-related puns in this driving impression of the newest addition to Toyota South Africa’s crossover stable. As tempting as it may be, I’ll simply stick to the facts instead.

Facts such as the reality that the fresh-faced Rush – which is a mite longer than a C-HR but a little shorter than a RAV4 – will be a serious contender in this particular part of the ever-growing crossover segment, where it interestingly finds itself without that many direct rivals (Honda BR-V, we’re looking at you).

Five not seven

So, what is the Rush, exactly? Well, it’s essentially a rebadged version of the latest-generation Daihatsu Terios, which itself is loosely based on the current Toyota Avanza. In other markets, the crossover is available as a seven-seater, but Toyota SA says that its market research suggests South African buyers would prefer five seats and lots of luggage space instead.

And plenty of space there most certainly is. In fact, opting not to include those two rear seats has resulted in a frankly cavernous 609 dm3 luggage capacity. Unfortunately, though, Toyota has not included a parcel shelf, which is essential for keeping the contents of the boot well hidden from prying eyes (privacy glass has not been included back there either). Overall, though, the Rush is rather well packaged, offering generous headroom both front and back, and enough space to accommodate even long-limbed rear passengers.

Behind the wheel

The driving position, on the other hand, is a little awkward. For starters, there’s no reach adjustment on the steering column, which is frustrating for those who prefer to keep the tiller close. The absence of a dead pedal next to the clutch also means there’s nowhere comfortable to rest your left foot when you’re not swapping cogs. Furthermore, the driver’s seat is positioned fairly high, which may prove tricky for taller drivers.

Still, the overall fit and finish of the cabin is quite impressive (although the inclusion of faux-stitching on the facia and door panels is a little strange), coming across robust enough to deal with the rigours of family life. As a bonus for those who obsess about staying properly hydrated, the Rush is fitted with as many as 11 cup holders throughout the cabin.

While the overall design of the interior is refreshingly simple, with cloth seats and plenty of basic plastic finishes, there’s also a hint of piano black and contrasting enamel white trim to create an almost premium atmosphere. But the centrepiece of the cabin is undoubtedly the easy-to-operate touchscreen infotainment system, which includes handy features such as navigation, a rear camera display and screen mirroring.

On the road

The Rush is powered by a naturally aspirated 1,5-litre four-cylinder engine, which sends its 77 kW and 136 N.m of torque to the rear wheels via a five-speed manual gearbox (there’s also the option of a four-speed automatic). The engine is surprisingly lively, likely largely thanks to the transmission’s short ratios. But that means a shift to second gear is required almost immediately after taking off. In addition, the engine will settle close to the (lofty) 4 000 r/min mark in fifth at 120 km/h, which doesn’t do great things for NVH levels and fuel consumption.

So, in urban environments, the Rush feels rather nippy, with a composed ride courtesy of the front McPherson strut and rear multilink suspension setup, while on the highway it’s a little less at home. The electric power steering makes parking a cinch, but feedback from the tarmac is minimal. Should you wish to venture onto gravel roads, you’ll be happy to hear that the Rush’s 220 mm ride height lends it some ability.

Wrapping up

It’s worth noting that the Rush’s safety specification list is conclusive, and includes driver, passenger, side and curtain airbags (that’s a total of six) as well as ABS, traction control, stability control, hill assist control and parking sensors. At R299 900, the Rush might not be the most affordable crossover around, but it certainly offers impressive standard specification, including a generous six-service/90 000 km service plan.

While fairly minor details such as those short gear ratios and the lack of a parcel shelf might irk some potential buyers, there’s no denying that the Rush is a compelling proposition that looks likely to give direct rivals such as the Honda BR-V a hard time, and even trouble more established conventional crossovers. Expect to see plenty on the road soon.

Model:Toyota Rush 1,5 MT
Price:R299 900
Engine:1,5-litre, straight-four, petrol
Power:77 kW @ 6 000 r/min
Torque:136 N.m @ 4 200 r/min
0-100 km/h:N/A
Top Speed:165 km/h
Fuel Consumption:6,6 L/100 km
CO2:156 g/km
Transmission:Five-speed manual
Maintenance Plan:Six-service/90 000 km service plan

http://www.carmag.co.za/car-reviews/driven-toyota-rush-15-mt/
 

Duan

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This is both ugly and dangerously slow.

I expect many head-on collisions as so few people can overtake with such an underpowered vehicle. They are used to Gauteng highway driving and acceleration on this thing is slower than Julius at a math symposium.

If it did not look like the redheaded stepchild of Picasso and Dali then it might have been a mommy run about town.

Just NO! Go straight to NO, do not pass Go! Do not collect $200!

What were these people thinking?
 

Zenthrax

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This is both ugly and dangerously slow.

I expect many head-on collisions as so few people can overtake with such an underpowered vehicle. They are used to Gauteng highway driving and acceleration on this thing is slower than Julius at a math symposium.
So its a 5 seater with more power than that my old i20 ~2013, slightly heavier. But for some miracle reason it's cr@p before even leaving the showroom floor
.

The world =/= Guateng only :p
 

Duan

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So its a 5 seater with more power than that my old i20 ~2013, slightly heavier. But for some miracle reason it's cr@p before even leaving the showroom floor
Yes its crap. Not a miracle though. It is underpowered.

The world =/= Guateng only :p
You are of course right, but it probably represents more than 75% of the market for these rather ridiculous & ghastly creations.

Increase power to around 115kw with a proper auto gearbox, then do away with the styling mess and you have a very decent offering at that price point.
 

SoTrue

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So its a 5 seater with more power than that my old i20 ~2013, slightly heavier. But for some miracle reason it's cr@p before even leaving the showroom floor
.

The world =/= Guateng only :p
The kerb weight for the i20 auto is 1 056kg, and 1 260kg for the Rush Auto. I wouldn't say 19% is slighly heavier.
 

thechamp

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Yes its crap. Not a miracle though. It is underpowered.



You are of course right, but it probably represents more than 75% of the market for these rather ridiculous & ghastly creations.

Increase power to around 115kw with a proper auto gearbox, then do away with the styling mess and you have a very decent offering at that price point.
They obviously cut costs on the engine, it was either that or the features to stay in that price range. 6 airbags, ABS, Hill assist, VSC, Touch screen audio system with 6 speakers, reverse camera, PDC, auto lights, All this and more for R299k? they really tried, you have to give them that.

Take the Honda BR-V for comparison, you'll soon see this is not too shabby at that price point.
 
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thechamp

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The kerb weight for the i20 auto is 1 056kg, and 1 260kg for the Rush Auto. I wouldn't say 19% is slighly heavier.
Your i20 is obviously a smaller engine, they really should have tried harder. Honda is capable of doing better with a NA 1.5 engine, I don't see any reason why Toyota can't.
 

thechamp

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^^^ what he said. I can't imagine who buys this and actually looks at it and thinks it's a great looker.
How about someone buying it and thinking,"it has everything I require in terms of safety comfort and convenience and space, plus the ground clearance is good for the roads I use"? If people bought cars soley based on looks there would be very few cars on the roads because most beautiful cars are expensive, plus it is not bad as you guys are making it out to be, nothing out of the ordinary about it's looks.
 

Craig

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How about someone buying it and thinking,"it has everything I require in terms of safety comfort and convenience and space, plus the ground clearance is good for the roads I use"? If people bought cars soley based on looks there would be very few cars on the roads because most beautiful cars are expensive, plus it is not bad as you guys are making it out to be, nothing out of the ordinary about it's looks.
You are right, it's ugly, but not multipla level ugly. if it had a better engine and gearbox I would not mind driving one myself. But as it is now, for that kind of money, I would buy second hand.
 

thechamp

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You are right, it's ugly, but not multipla level ugly. if it had a better engine and gearbox I would not mind driving one myself. But as it is now, for that kind of money, I would buy second hand.
Seems the engine is the universal gripe on most reviews so far, looks are subjective and it is at times a waste of time arguing about them, putting that aside I think we'll be in agreement that it will be very hard to find some as specced as this in a similar price range.
 

FiestaST

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Stylish Rush arrives in SA: We drive Toyota's new 'baby Fortuner' - can the compact SUV take on Honda's BR-V?

Remember Daihatsu? The unassuming Japanese automaker and maker of the popular Sirion and Terios? Well despite officially leaving South Africa in 2015 the brand is still going strong globally, especially in its home market of Asia.

What does this have to do with Toyota SA? Well, the two Japanese automakers entered into an "emerging market agreement" and that partnership has bared fruit with the arrival of the new Toyota Rush in South Africa.

Globally, the Rush is, in fact, the Daihatsu Terios "returned", the previous generation of which was available in locally in 2015. The new SUV will be sold globally.

The new Rush hopes to grab its share of the SUV market with its aggressive pricing, stylish design and practicality.

In SA however, the new Rush SUV, sourced from Indonesia, has more in common with its Avanza sibling and with which it shares a platform and its 1.5-litre petrol engine.

The range

A single petrol engine variant is available though can be ordered in either manual or auto guise. And the price? The manual is priced at R299 900 while the four-speed auto model retails for R313 500.

Engine

Power is provided by a 1.5-litre four-cylinder engine with outputs of 77kW/136Nm. The engine can be mated to either a 5-speed manual transmission or 4-speed auto, driving power to the rear wheels.

Fuel consumption is rated at 6.6 litres/100km for the manual variant while the auto version has a claimed 6.7l/100km with CO2 figures of 156g/km and 158 g/km respectively.

Driving it

The engine is sprightly largely due to the transmission’s short ratios which poses its own problems on the road; the manual gearbox is in dire need of a 6th gear, as you’ll soon hit peak rpms, doing little to promote fuel consumption and reducing engine noise.

The Rush is designed to handle the rigours of city life and feels rather nippy, with a composed ride and capable suspension. It’s surprisingly good off the beaten track too, capable of tackling on gravel roads with its 220mm ride height but it is by no means an off-roader. There’s loads of feedback from its electric steering, making parking a breeze despite its dimensions.

Ride quality was fair even traversing the rutted sections of the Ado Elephant park near Port Elizabeth.

Overall, it’s a pleasant enough vehicle at moderate speeds and will see its occupants arrive at their destination in relative comfort.

Inside

The design of the Rush borrows heavily from its Fortuner sibling, with its large horizontal grille slats, LED headlights and a body-colour spoiler. Inside, it borrows elements from the Fortuner and current Avanza. The centre stack carries a six-speaker audio system compatible with Bluetooth, Android Auto Plus Show and Apple CarPlay, controlled via an 18cm infotainment touchscreen, auto aircon, a USB port a 12V socket.

It's fitted with rear-parking sensors, a rear camera, satnav, hill hold, stability control and six airbags are standard. Compared to the larger Fortuner, the plastic bits are coloured in black (as opossed to beige) and the upholstery is black fabric.

The Rush is well packaged, offering loads of head- and legroom for all passengers and a family-pleasing huge cargo bay; boot space is rated at a stupendous 609-litres (in Indonesia it boasts a third-row of seats) and the SUV seats 5.

A big gripe is a lack of a parcel shelf, essential in South Africa for keeping the contents of your boot hidden. The SUV also lacks privacy glass. The fit and finish of the cabin is adequate for its price point even with faux-stitching along the dashboard and door panels.

What about the Avanza?

The Rush measures 4.4m long, 1.6m wide, 1.7m tall and has a wheelbase of 2.6m and a ride height of 220mm. Interestingly, it has a maximum wading depth of 600mm.

The Rush is larger than the Avanza; It is 35mm wider, 10mm taller, 295mm longer and has 30mm longer wheelbase.

Overall

Toyota has set its sights on dominating the compact SUV market with the addition of a second Avanza-based vehicle into the segment. The target market? South African motorists seeking a family-friendly 5-seater in need of more boot space than car seats.

The boot is by far one of the biggest you’ll encounter in its segemnt. Should you require more space than its voluminous confines can offer, the seat can be folded down. I wish it came with a sixth gear as the noise level while cruising at highway speeds is very high. A minor gripe is that those seeking an extra row of seats are unable to do so.

Overall, with a price-tag below the psychological R300 000 mark, it’s a well-specced and capable family SUV that should give direct rivals (read: Honda BR-V) and more expensive crossovers a run for their money – Toyota predicts 200 units a month.

Toyota Rush pricing:

Toyota Rush High MT - R299 900
Toyota Rush High AT - R313 500

A six-year or 90 000km service plan is standard, backed up by a 3-year or 100 000km warranty. Service intervals are 15 000km.

https://www.wheels24.co.za/OffRoad_and_4x4/Bakkie_and_SUV/stylish-rush-arrives-in-sa-we-drive-toyotas-new-baby-fortuner-can-the-compact-suv-take-on-hondas-br-v-20180711
 
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