Tuks phasing out Afrikaans as medium of instruction

Knyro

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It's not just Pretorians who go to Tuks though, when I was there the local crowd was actually fewer than 50% (not sure of total of course, just in the classes I was in). Many were staying in hostels from all over - Jo'burg, Natal, further north.


I don't think @Knyro actually wants to debate or learn anything, he just seems to want to have the last word and be right.

For instance,

Einstein's general relativity was pure thought experiment. There was not a shred of data, it was years before it was even tested (deflection of starlight in a solar eclipse) and decades before any proper verification was possible.
How about you stop talking crap. Einstein's thought experiments are the exception that proves the rule. I interact with theorists and read theoretical physics papers all the time. The majority of them will cite some experimental data.
 
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ɹǝuuᴉM

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I think the whites in SA should be happy with English. At least is an European language and fairly easy to learn if you grew up with Afrikaans. Imagine if you had to learn Zulu to attend an university. South Africa is becoming a joke. Everyone knows that. I wonder where do SA's universities stand in the world rankings? There was a time when Cape Town was in the top 100 but that time was f... and long ago. #SoSad #ShitHole
 

ForceFate

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I think the whites in SA should be happy with English. At least is an European language and fairly easy to learn if you grew up with Afrikaans. Imagine if you had to learn Zulu to attend an university. South Africa is becoming a joke. Everyone knows that. I wonder where do SA's universities stand in the world rankings? There was a time when Cape Town was in the top 100 but that time was f... and long ago. #SoSad #ShitHole
I trust you to come up with gems like this while native speakers of the language who posted here appear to welcome the move.
 

newby_investor

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How about you stop talking crap. Einstein's thought experiments are the exception that proves the rule. I interact with theorists and read theoretical physics papers all the time. The majority of them will cite some experimental data.
Like I said, I'm pretty sure you're not interested in anything except having the last word. @Nicodeamus has contributed a lot of interesting stuff based on actual experience which you've barely acknowledged, except to dismiss it.

Exceptions don't prove rules, they disprove them. If you did any proper science you might understand this... But even then, Einstein isn't the only one, Stephen Hawking's early work (not so sure about later stuff) was pretty much entirely theoretical.

Physics abounds in theory-only stuff. Sure there is an abundance of data available in recent years, so many papers do make use of at least some observational / experimental data, but some don't. There's no rule saying they must or must not.

But physics is also not the only science. Departments like biology will rely heavily on experimental or observational data, not much "pure theory" there, but lots of what the humanities departments publish will have very little of what you might call "experimental data", though it doesn't fit nicely into what we think of as theory / practical in the hard sciences.

Edit: But that's also not really either here nor there. The point (I think) that @Nicodeamus was originally trying to make was that there are a lot of low-quality papers published at many universities around the world, which while technically novel contributions, aren't very useful. This wasn't to cast aspersions at pure theory or mathematics which doesn't appear useful immediately. I know this because I've been guilty of publishing one or two of these myself, for the purposes of graduating from my postgraduate studies.
 
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Knyro

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Like I said, I'm pretty sure you're not interested in anything except having the last word. @Nicodeamus has contributed a lot of interesting stuff based on actual experience which you've barely acknowledged, except to dismiss it.

Exceptions don't prove rules, they disprove them. If you did any proper science you might understand this... But even then, Einstein isn't the only one, Stephen Hawking's early work (not so sure about later stuff) was pretty much entirely theoretical.

Physics abounds in theory-only stuff. Sure there is an abundance of data available in recent years, so many papers do make use of at least some observational / experimental data, but some don't. There's no rule saying they must or must not.

But physics is also not the only science. Departments like biology will rely heavily on experimental or observational data, not much "pure theory" there, but lots of what the humanities departments publish will have very little of what you might call "experimental data", though it doesn't fit nicely into what we think of as theory / practical in the hard sciences.

Edit: But that's also not really either here nor there. The point (I think) that @Nicodeamus was originally trying to make was that there are a lot of low-quality papers published at many universities around the world, which while technically novel contributions, aren't very useful. This wasn't to cast aspersions at pure theory or mathematics which doesn't appear useful immediately. I know this because I've been guilty of publishing one or two of these myself, for the purposes of graduating from my postgraduate studies.
How can I be interested in having the last word when Nicodeamus had the last post in our exchange? And I didn't even bother replying to access? You've got to be some next level loser to care about having the last word on the internet to a bunch of strangers.

"Exception that proves the rule" is a saying, duh. I use it in casual speech like most people do. I made my points, he made his, we move on.
 

access

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better start telling that russian country to publish in english only.. :ROFL: bwahaha

i mean what have they ever contributed to science. its so little it might as well be in english. lol!!


people need to do their thing in their mother tongue. its a very simple concept.
 

jack_spratt

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better start telling that russian country to publish in english only.. :ROFL: bwahaha

i mean what have they ever contributed to science. its so little it might as well be in english. lol!!


people need to do their thing in their mother tongue. its a very simple concept.
Getting rid of Afrikaans is a type of xenophobia.
 

zeb

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Delport said the decision from the various interest groups was informed by the findings that the percentage of students who reported their home language to be Afrikaans had decreased from 85% to 30% between 1992 and 2015.

“In 2016, approximately 18% of students expressed a preference for Afrikaans as a medium of instruction.”
Even though the "findings" are pretty obvious because of admission policies, I support the decision 100%
 

lumeer

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It does place Afrikaans students at a disadvantage as they were schooled in Afrikaans and suddenly have to switch to English. Other English second language speakers generally would have been schooled in English. So an Afrikaans student who knows what a "heelgetal", "gelykbenige driehoek" or "skuinssy" are, would now suddenly be assumed to know what an "integer", "isosceles triangle" and "hypotenuse" are. Luckily Afrikaans people are good at adapting so I'm sure that the students will eventually be fine.
 

thechamp

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It does place Afrikaans students at a disadvantage as they were schooled in Afrikaans and suddenly have to switch to English. Other English second language speakers generally would have been schooled in English. So an Afrikaans student who knows what a "heelgetal", "gelykbenige driehoek" or "skuinssy" are, would now suddenly be assumed to know what an "integer", "isosceles triangle" and "hypotenuse" are. Luckily Afrikaans people are good at adapting so I'm sure that the students will eventually be fine.
Everyone is good at adapting.
 

EADC

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My parents predicted this many years ago, in a family of Afrikaans people they decided to raise me English ahead of the curve I guess like many others probably.
 

Mista_Mobsta

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It does place Afrikaans students at a disadvantage as they were schooled in Afrikaans and suddenly have to switch to English. Other English second language speakers generally would have been schooled in English. So an Afrikaans student who knows what a "heelgetal", "gelykbenige driehoek" or "skuinssy" are, would now suddenly be assumed to know what an "integer", "isosceles triangle" and "hypotenuse" are. Luckily Afrikaans people are good at adapting so I'm sure that the students will eventually be fine.
I think the only disadvantage an Afrikaans person has in the educational space is a disadvantage they placed on themselves. I was in Afrikaans schools during my primary and high school years. I studied in English and found the only challenge was on the terminology used in Mathematics. I think it's a great idea for Government funded universities to phase out Afrikaans and focus on English tuition. If you want to study in another language, study in privately funded Afrikaans specific universities.
 

eg2505

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do you think they might change the university name now that Afrikaans isn't being used?

maybe to reflect visible changes?
 
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