Turbos - your thoughts - share your thoughts to someone who wants to know more

jxharding

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I'm not making any assumptions here. I don't know a lot about turbo's.
What I've been taught to believe (from friends) is that these turbos could possibly give problems after a certain amount of KM (this was however maybe 10 years ago that I heard this).
Also, seems there's a movement towards turbos (thinking Ford, VW for example)? Like I said ,I dont know a lot about turbos and cars.

Any thoughts anyone would like to share please?
Is this a good/great/bad move towards turbo's in entry level cars?
Has turbo's developed to a point where they can last 200 000 km before they need to get replaced?
Would you buy a car with a turbo, in order to get better fuel consumption for example?
 

Pitbull

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I'm not making any assumptions here. I don't know a lot about turbo's.
What I've been taught to believe (from friends) is that these turbos could possibly give problems after a certain amount of KM (this was however maybe 10 years ago that I heard this).
Also, seems there's a movement towards turbos (thinking Ford, VW for example)? Like I said ,I dont know a lot about turbos and cars.

Any thoughts anyone would like to share please?
Is this a good/great/bad move towards turbo's in entry level cars?
Has turbo's developed to a point where they can last 200 000 km before they need to get replaced?
Would you buy a car with a turbo, in order to get better fuel consumption for example?

A Turbo just like any other engine part needs to be correctly used and it will last for a very long time.

Few things:

. Don't add a Turbo to an engine that wasn't built for a Turbo. This comes with a lot of headaches.
. If you drove the car no matter how hard, let it idle about 1 minute before switching the car off.
. Oil is very important in Turbo engines. Make sure you don't miss a service interval.

If possible when you do buy a second hand Turbo, have the turbo removed and serviced or just buy a new one from the word go. That way you can look after it the way it needs to be done. You have no idea how the previous owner looked after the Turbo. If it's a petrol car before buying it, start the car and go to the back at the exhaust. Put your hand over the exhaust and push it closed till you cant hold it no more (at Idle) if you take your hand away and smoke comes out. Move on...
 

vicv

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A Turbo just like any other engine part needs to be correctly used and it will last for a very long time.

Few things:

. Don't add a Turbo to an engine that wasn't built for a Turbo. This comes with a lot of headaches.
. If you drove the car no matter how hard, let it idle about 1 minute before switching the car off.
. Oil is very important in Turbo engines. Make sure you don't miss a service interval.

If possible when you do buy a second hand Turbo, have the turbo removed and serviced or just buy a new one from the word go. That way you can look after it the way it needs to be done. You have no idea how the previous owner looked after the Turbo. If it's a petrol car before buying it, start the car and go to the back at the exhaust. Put your hand over the exhaust and push it closed till you cant hold it no more (at Idle) if you take your hand away and smoke comes out. Move on...
+1 The big problem lies in 2nd hand turbo cars. Bought a 2nd hand TDI and about 2 months later the turbo popped on 175000k. With idling and proper care a turbo could last you a long time.
 

jxharding

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+1 The big problem lies in 2nd hand turbo cars. Bought a 2nd hand TDI and about 2 months later the turbo popped on 175000k. With idling and proper care a turbo could last you a long time.

Now that is exactly what I was told by others too. You sell your turbo car just before the turbo reaches a specific mileage or likelihood to start giving problems.
Cause when stuff does hit the fan, its serious.

So the TDI is kind of synonymous with speed/performance. Yet the new wave of turbo's get advertised along with fuel consumption rather than performance. Are these new turbo's (geared towards efficiency) more likely to last longer?
 

Pitbull

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Now that is exactly what I was told by others too. You sell your turbo car just before the turbo reaches a specific mileage or likelihood to start giving problems.
Cause when stuff does hit the fan, its serious.

So the TDI is kind of synonymous with speed/performance. Yet the new wave of turbo's get advertised along with fuel consumption rather than performance. Are these new turbo's (geared towards efficiency) more likely to last longer?

Turbo's are fitted to smaller engines these days to give more power per size. So the consumption should be lower. However it all depends on how you drive it. If you hammer it for small distances you will increase the usage and you will actually use a lot more fuel than you would on a bigger engine. Turbo only really saves on consumption on long open roads or if driven with some restraint. It's hard though :eek:
 

vicv

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Now that is exactly what I was told by others too. You sell your turbo car just before the turbo reaches a specific mileage or likelihood to start giving problems.
Cause when stuff does hit the fan, its serious.

So the TDI is kind of synonymous with speed/performance. Yet the new wave of turbo's get advertised along with fuel consumption rather than performance. Are these new turbo's (geared towards efficiency) more likely to last longer?
I'd guess that with technology advancing at the current pace and the large amount of cheap, efficient turbo cars on the road, yes.

Thing is, turbos get extremely hot, sometimes so hot that you can see right through them (no jokes). That is why it's important to let it idle after driving, letting oil spool through it and cool it down. Never switch it off instantly like you would a normal petrol car.

Personally, I wouldn't think twice about buying a new turbocharged car. 2nd hand is the problem. Look how many GTI's are at scrapyards and cheap dealers due to the turbo popping and all the oil running out the exhaust.
 

SauRoNZA

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Engine parts fail, regardless of exactly what they are.

The worse a car gets treated the more likely something is to fail.

Warm your car up properly before you nail it and cool it down properly before you switch it off and you'll save yourself a whole lot of headaches when it comes to higher mileage.

I've got a turbo car with 145 000km on the clock and not a problem in sight...with the Turbo.


However a whole lot of other stuff has come and gone which has cost a bit more money...probably not all that far behind replacing the turbo itself.


Cars cost money, it's a fact of life. So look after it as best you can.



*****

Turbo's aren't that expensive to replace either in the bigger scope of things. Also they can often be repaired and this is where the rub comes in because many workshops have a replace instead of repair policy which is why it's considered so pricey.

Besides often if it does go...upgrade it to a bigger one (within reason) and you score some benefits.


With modern cars being both turbo and supercharged at the same time the technology has been tried and tested to the point where it's as common place and reliable as any NA car.
 
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Dolby

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Also certain makes/models have known issues.

I wouldn't touch a TDI or the E46 320d turbo used
 

SauRoNZA

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Also certain makes/models have known issues.

I wouldn't touch a TDI or the E46 320d turbo used

That's a bit generic.

There are a great many TDI's in a great many different capacities and different cars and revisions etc.
 

Gaz{M}

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Even if your turbo does pop, they are so common and prolific these days that it shouldn't be a bankrupting repair bill. Like others have said: oil oil oil. These things drink oil and need the right manufacturers spec of oil in them. People who are used to nautally aspirated engines are often surprised to find their turbo car using oil between services. This is to be expected, so check your oil at each fillup (but DON'T buy the garages oil). Make sure you use the correct oil and keep the level well above minimum at all times. Buy a bottle from the dealer and keep it in your boot.

The idling before stopping thing shouldn't be needed anymore, as modern turbos should have oil circulation pumps even after you switch off, but use your head and drive the last 60 seconds "gently" at lower revs and small throttle input just to be kind to the poor thing.

Lastly, never buy a second hand car without some sort of warranty.
 

reactor_sa

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Even if your turbo does pop, they are so common and prolific these days that it shouldn't be a bankrupting repair bill. Like others have said: oil oil oil. These things drink oil and need the right manufacturers spec of oil in them. People who are used to nautally aspirated engines are often surprised to find their turbo car using oil between services. This is to be expected, so check your oil at each fillup (but DON'T buy the garages oil). Make sure you use the correct oil and keep the level well above minimum at all times. Buy a bottle from the dealer and keep it in your boot.

The idling before stopping thing shouldn't be needed anymore, as modern turbos should have oil circulation pumps even after you switch off, but use your head and drive the last 60 seconds "gently" at lower revs and small throttle input just to be kind to the poor thing.

Lastly, never buy a second hand car without some sort of warranty.
Disagree on turbos generally drinking oil. If it leaks then sure. But my ford TDCi has 135k km on the clock, first turbo, and I've never ever had to top up oil between services.
Since the maintenance plan ended at 60k km I changed the oil every 10k km instead of every 15k km. Then since 90k km I've been changing the oil every 7.5k km (so between the usual 15k km services). I use quality oil (probably better than the castrol **** ford uses when motorcraft oil runs out), and always used 50ppm diesel until recently when sasol released 10ppm which I use now.
 

Slootvreter

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Also certain makes/models have known issues.

I wouldn't touch a TDI or the E46 320d turbo used

E46 320d prior to 2002 had issues. Up to 2004/5 they were fine. I had one, truly awesome car. Only issue I had was with the injectors. That's where you start pissing out money.

EDIT: What also happened with these, is that the swirl flaps (Google it) broke and got swallowed by the engine, and sometimes a bit of it made it's way through the engine and hit the turbo.
 

LCBXX

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I don't think any turbo at this stage will last to 200,000KM without needing some type of reconditioning. That said, if you take reasonable common-sense-care of your engine in general it would theoretically last to 150,000KM. You might have a turbo that easily lasts that long and another that fails every 30,000KM under the same conditions. As said before - parts fail.

Would I buy a petrol or diesel turbo? For me it's a diesel turbo. I bought my first one in 2005 (96KW Polo TDi) and am now on my 3rd (2x Honda diesels) averaging around 5.8L/KM in JHB Conditions. Wife has a Fiesta 1.0 92KW EcoBoost which is a lot of fun as well but it is hardly economical the way she drives it.
 

Pitbull

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I don't think any turbo at this stage will last to 200,000KM without needing some type of reconditioning. That said, if you take reasonable common-sense-care of your engine in general it would theoretically last to 150,000KM. You might have a turbo that easily lasts that long and another that fails every 30,000KM under the same conditions. As said before - parts fail.

Would I buy a petrol or diesel turbo? For me it's a diesel turbo. I bought my first one in 2005 (96KW Polo TDi) and am now on my 3rd (2x Honda diesels) averaging around 5.8L/KM in JHB Conditions. Wife has a Fiesta 1.0 92KW EcoBoost which is a lot of fun as well but it is hardly economical the way she drives it.

By far the best engine ever created in my books. Have you seen the size of it? Hard to imagine that amount of power coming from a engine prob the size of a school bag :D
 

D tj

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Have a Merc Vito panel van, bought with 90k now235k +- very happy with it & turbo.
I have only used diesel 50 and change oil @ 8-10 k intervals.
I always try to ensure the last bit of a drive is at low revs, and stop wait, climb out then switch off and into gear.
 

LCBXX

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By far the best engine ever created in my books. Have you seen the size of it? Hard to imagine that amount of power coming from a engine prob the size of a school bag :D
It is difficult to make out exactly how tiny it is since Ford has managed to fill that engine bay with all kinds of piping and wire. The turbo however is so tiny it can almost be called cute - trying to find a picture of it somewhere:
2014-ford-fiesta-17.jpg
 

Pitbull

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Have a Merc Vito panel van, bought with 90k now235k +- very happy with it & turbo.
I have only used diesel 50 and change oil @ 8-10 k intervals.
I always try to ensure the last bit of a drive is at low revs, and stop wait, climb out then switch off and into gear.

Even with Cool down pumps on Turbo's. Best to have it run down anyway just to be safe. It's just another link in the chain (Cool down pump) that can break and then cause the Turbo to fail. You can have an aftermarket device installed where if you switch off thecar it still idles for a minute before it dies.

I would just make sure to have it idle as good practice. When taking your laptop out the boot, and taking bags into the house let it idle. Then just come back and switch it off when done. Please for the love of all that is good don't race to the shop and switch off the car when you stop there. I die a little inside everytime I see that :eek:
 

Pitbull

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It is difficult to make out exactly how tiny it is since Ford has managed to fill that engine bay with all kinds of piping and wire. The turbo however is so tiny it can almost be called cute - trying to find a picture of it somewhere:
View attachment 127069

Wiki:

The engine also features an internal timing belt, bathed in the engine oil, for long life and greater efficiency and reduced noise. The exhaust manifold is cast into the cylinder head, reducing warm up times and therefore further aiding efficiency. All this is packaged in an engine block the size of an A4 sheet of paper
 

Dolby

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That's a bit generic.

There are a great many TDI's in a great many different capacities and different cars and revisions etc.

Sorry - I meant the one referred to above Polo 1.9TDI
 
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