U.S. Politics

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cerebus

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Most jobs? Not a chance. Realistically its 20%.

Still it's not a bad thing that more people have the option to work from home than before. For me I don't want to go back to an office, or maybe just a couple of times a week. It's better for my family.


Thing is the trolls like Temujin etc are just shrinking into irrelevance. They're losing power and not interested in anything but their feedback loop of online right-wing garbage feeds.
 

11Snowman11

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I actually have been thinking of the root cause of the issue with the services provided by Google, Facebook etc. The root cause of the problem I think is the jurisdiction of the contract law that these companies use. If you read the terms and services that they provide, they all state that any disputes will set in the jurisdiction of California, so it effectively is impossible for someone outside of California to settle a dispute. Yet, if I go and make a website called Google and provide exactly the same service as they do, minus the censorship, they can go and use the South African courts to compel me to take down my website with copyright law. Being able to arbitrarily pick your jurisdiction like this

The solution is actually very simple, if they want to make use of another country's legal system to protect their IP and copyright against an individual, then they have to use that country's legal system to resolve contract disputes.

It's not really arbitrary if it's in their T&C's, though. It's standardised.

Is it different at all from how other service providers operate? It would make sense that disputes are settled where the dispute arose, wouldn't you say?

It doesn't seem to the case anyway, if you go through some of their litigation, it's from all over the US and abroad. It would make sense for the majority to be in California, given they're incorporated there. This is standard for all corporations, surely?


Same for Facebook, who have also been sued across the US and abroad.
Do not think this contributes much to the discussion.
Jurisdiction regarding private law and especially private international law is very complicated and there are quite a lot of factors that are considered. If you guys are really interested in this I can recommend that you read about the multilateral conflict rule and the unilateral conflict rule as this can explain somewhat about how jurisdiction applies in international private law cases.

Copyright laws are somewhat standard internationally as many countries are part of the Berne Convention regarding copyright. Thus our Copyright Act also applies to work (like books, films, software, music etc.) of foreign nationals.

In our Civil procedure, the jurisdiction is decided based on various factors. For a contract, the jurisdiction can be chosen based on where the contract was entered into, where the breach took place or where the performance must be rendered. Another way is to look where the cause for the litigation took place.
So let us say Google breaches a privacy law of South Africa. It is then generally assumed that since the breach took place in South Africa, a South African court will have jurisdiction over that matter.
Now the Companies Act says that a company can be sued in the jurisdiction of their principal place of business. So google can be sued in South Africa since they have a branch in SA and thus they are a registered company in SA.
Other foreign companies will follow the same route as google. The Companies Act state that foreign companies must have a registered place of business in South Africa if they plan to conduct business in the country.
 

Unhappy438

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Realistically, you are wrong...

In the US it is more like 69%
rqsjkekzwuuagbb6vn3orq.png

https://news.gallup.com/poll/321800/covid-remote-work-update.aspx

Can you not read stats? 33% of people are always working at home and only 2/3rds of those want to continue that way (probably because for them its not realistic in the long term). So that makes just under 22%. USA probably would have one of the highest numbers in the world as well.
 

cerebus

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Can you not read stats? 33% of people are always working at home and only 2/3rds of those want to continue that way (probably because for them its not realistic in the long term). So that makes just under 22%. USA probably would have one of the highest numbers in the world as well.

It's unclear if that 2/3rds represents only the workers who ONLY wfh or includes those who partially wfh. I'm trying to get the information but it would make quite a difference. 2/3rds of both would be around 38% vs 22%.
 

Unhappy438

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It's unclear if that 2/3rds represents only the workers who ONLY wfh or includes those who partially wfh. I'm trying to get the information but it would make quite a difference. 2/3rds of both would be around 38% vs 22%.

Here is the paper that gives a 20% figure - https://www.dallasfed.org/research/papers/2020/wp2017

Some subjective info, a lot of people who currently work from home will go back to office afterwards. Its not realistic for them from a productivity or success pov. My girlfriend is one of them, her sales have dropped tremendously when trying to schedule everything and acquire new clients on zoom.
 

cerebus

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Here is the paper that gives a 20% figure - https://www.dallasfed.org/research/papers/2020/wp2017

Some subjective info, a lot of people who currently work from home will go back to office afterwards. Its not realistic for them from a productivity or success pov. My girlfriend is one of them, her sales have dropped tremendously when trying to schedule everything and acquire new clients on zoom.

Yeah ok fair enough, I still don't see what's negative about having more freedom to wfh though. 20% of the workforce is still a huge number of people who don't need to be traveling every day.
 

buka001

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Yeah ok fair enough, I still don't see what's negative about having more freedom to wfh though. 20% of the workforce is still a huge number of people who don't need to be traveling every day.
I don't see a problem with it.

Only see a problem with ignorant takes like Konfab, who glosses over the experiences and circumstances of millions, with his take, while trying to be ideologically apposed to an initiative that frees up more people to work and be involved in the economy.
 

Unhappy438

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Yeah ok fair enough, I still don't see what's negative about having more freedom to wfh though. 20% of the workforce is still a huge number of people who don't need to be traveling every day.

Yeah nothing negative, its a good thing. Im just arguing against the idea that Bidens plan is dumb for including child services when everyone can work from home.
 

Temujin

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  1. "Stand up straight with your shoulders back."
  2. "Treat yourself like you are someone you are responsible for helping."
  3. "Make friends with people who want the best for you."
  4. "Compare yourself with who you were yesterday, not with who someone else is today."
  5. "Do not let your children do anything that makes you dislike them."
  6. "Set your house in perfect order before you criticize the world."
  7. "Pursue what is meaningful (not what is expedient)."
  8. "Tell the truth — or, at least, don’t lie."
  9. "Assume that the person you are listening to might know something you don’t."
  10. "Be precise in your speech."
  11. "Do not bother children when they are skate-boarding."
  12. "Pet a cat when you encounter one on the street."
Much nazi.
This evil must not be allowed to continue.

EybQy4pWYAASsUj

1599668093190.jpeg
 
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buka001

Honorary Master
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Oct 16, 2009
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  1. "Stand up straight with your shoulders back."
  2. "Treat yourself like you are someone you are responsible for helping."
  3. "Make friends with people who want the best for you."
  4. "Compare yourself with who you were yesterday, not with who someone else is today."
  5. "Do not let your children do anything that makes you dislike them."
  6. "Set your house in perfect order before you criticize the world."
  7. "Pursue what is meaningful (not what is expedient)."
  8. "Tell the truth — or, at least, don’t lie."
  9. "Assume that the person you are listening to might know something you don’t."
  10. "Be precise in your speech."
  11. "Do not bother children when they are skate-boarding."
  12. "Pet a cat when you encounter one on the street."
Much nazi.
This evil must not be allowed to continue.

EybQy4pWYAASsUj

View attachment 1048849

[*]"Set your house in perfect order before you criticize the world."

[*]"Be precise in your speech."

be5f3c06acb52dad07293a6cdf6b9ad3.jpg
 

scudsucker

Executive Member
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Also 2) "Treat yourself like you are someone you are responsible for helping.

How is that benzo addiction working out for him?
 

RanzB

Honorary Master
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1617882661884.png

I could feign indignation about this being the man who writes books about the level of discourse plummeting but goddam if this didn't make me laugh
 
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