UJ appoints 25-year-old Bhaso Ndzendze as head of department of politics and international relations

JuliusSeizure

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Cosmik Debris

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Soft degree that only needs an opinion and some references to politics and persons that fit the lecturers views. No empirical proofs required. Easy, even Malema and Ndlozi could graduate. Now try a STEM subject degree.

It's not for no reason that political science and humanities degrees are rated at the bottom of the academic pile with the Social Sciences degree right at the bottom.
 

ForceFate

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Not everyone can be experts in neuroscience like you and me and we should applaud youngsters a bit.
Besides, there are a bunch of other young people doing well in the STEM fields in various roles in academia.
 
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Not everyone can be experts in neuroscience like you and me and we should applaud youngsters a bit.

Um, there's literally no way a 25-year-old should be head of a department at a university unless the individual was some kind of child prodigy who graduated from university at 14 (for example). The linked article does not suggest this was the case. A standard 3-year degree + Honours is 4 years, Masters is 1 or 2 years and the PhD is a minimum of 3 years. Only once you got your PhD can you really establish yourself as a researcher and that usually takes a long time...to just publish ONE journal article can take between a year and 2 years...sometimes never. You need to be published many times like that to become an established researcher. Then you need to attend a multitude of conferences, publish book chapters etc. to become a leader in your field. I wonder what his NRF rating is.
 

Cosmik Debris

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Not everyone can be experts in neuroscience like you and me and we should applaud youngsters a bit.

For having an opinion that reflects the lecturers? That's normally called sycophancy but gets rewarded these days.
 

Cosmik Debris

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Um, there's literally no way a 25-year-old should be head of a department at a university unless the individual was some kind of child prodigy who graduated from university at 14 (for example). The linked article does not suggest this was the case. A standard 3-year degree + Honours is 4 years, Masters is 1 or 2 years and the PhD is a minimum of 3 years. Only once you got your PhD can you really establish yourself as a researcher and that usually takes a long time...to just publish ONE journal article can take between a year and 2 years...sometimes never. You need to be published many times like that to become an established researcher. Then you need to attend a multitude of conferences, publish book chapters etc. to become a leader in your field. I wonder what his NRF rating is.

Exactly. But his "expertise" is in opinions. And those are the same as ar se holes; - Everyone has one. No pesky empirical proof needed and the system doesn't have to be proven to work as it does in STEM degrees.

Just imagining a car is OK in political science. Building the car is required in STEM subjects.
 

one poster

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his "expertise" is in opinions. And those are the same as ar se holes; - Everyone has one.
Empirical proof for this? (google: Imperforate anus).

If UJ appointed the oke to head up the Engineering department grab a flamethrower otherwise not sure I get the need to pee on the parade.

Good luck to him.
 

Cosmik Debris

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Empirical proof for this? (google: Imperforate anus).

If UJ appointed the oke to head up the Engineering department grab a flamethrower otherwise not sure I get the need to pee on the parade.

Good luck to him.

Did you see this?

Um, there's literally no way a 25-year-old should be head of a department at a university unless the individual was some kind of child prodigy who graduated from university at 14 (for example). The linked article does not suggest this was the case. A standard 3-year degree + Honours is 4 years, Masters is 1 or 2 years and the PhD is a minimum of 3 years. Only once you got your PhD can you really establish yourself as a researcher and that usually takes a long time...to just publish ONE journal article can take between a year and 2 years...sometimes never. You need to be published many times like that to become an established researcher. Then you need to attend a multitude of conferences, publish book chapters etc. to become a leader in your field. I wonder what his NRF rating is.
 

Cray

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Um, there's literally no way a 25-year-old should be head of a department at a university unless the individual was some kind of child prodigy who graduated from university at 14 (for example). The linked article does not suggest this was the case. A standard 3-year degree + Honours is 4 years, Masters is 1 or 2 years and the PhD is a minimum of 3 years. Only once you got your PhD can you really establish yourself as a researcher and that usually takes a long time...to just publish ONE journal article can take between a year and 2 years...sometimes never. You need to be published many times like that to become an established researcher. Then you need to attend a multitude of conferences, publish book chapters etc. to become a leader in your field. I wonder what his NRF rating is.
He got his Phd last year, how many more years is acceptable for him to be qualified?
 
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He got his Phd last year, how many more years is acceptable for him to be qualified?
A PhD is a necessary but not sufficient condition to be appointed as a HoD.

In terms of time, it's however long it takes to become an established researcher in his field.

A person who has just received his PhD would be at the bottom of the academic ladder - junior lecturer level typically.
 

ForceFate

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A PhD is a necessary but not sufficient condition to be appointed as a HoD.

In terms of time, it's however long it takes to become an established researcher in his field.

A person who has just received his PhD would be at the bottom of the academic ladder - junior lecturer level typically.
But is HOD not a managerial position more than it's academic?
 

ubercal

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Um, there's literally no way a 25-year-old should be head of a department at a university unless the individual was some kind of child prodigy who graduated from university at 14 (for example). The linked article does not suggest this was the case. A standard 3-year degree + Honours is 4 years, Masters is 1 or 2 years and the PhD is a minimum of 3 years. Only once you got your PhD can you really establish yourself as a researcher and that usually takes a long time...to just publish ONE journal article can take between a year and 2 years...sometimes never. You need to be published many times like that to become an established researcher. Then you need to attend a multitude of conferences, publish book chapters etc. to become a leader in your field. I wonder what his NRF rating is.

must have the gift of the gab
 
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But is HOD not a managerial position more than it's academic?
Yes, that is correct. Many academics actively avoid becoming HoD for this very reason BUT it is still usually someone who has a number of research publications under his/her belt and has made a contribution to his/her field. Ideally, the department should be led by someone who has the respect of his/her colleagues and in academia that is usually measured by your number and quality of publications which is in turn proxied by your academic title (e.g. Junior Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Associate Prof., Prof.)
 
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