Unisa will let struggling students write open-book exams... at home

xumwun

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It's not exactly like you can do your whole degree this way, it applies to at most 2 modules.
Even if you do get one of these concessions they almost never give these open book exams, if you're lucky you might get an earlier exam opportunity.

This concession they speak of is for students who need 2 or less modules to complete their degree. They have the option of an alternative assessment if they have already attempted those modules.


http://www.unisa.ac.za/contents/study/docs/myRegistration-Unisa-2015-Rules-for-students.pdf
Undergraduate students in their final year of study who have a maximum of two modules outstanding to complete
the qualification may qualify for assistance in terms of the procedure to assist students who have one or two modules
outstanding to complete a qualification at Unisa. Modules offered for Non-Degree Purposes in order to complete a
qualification at another university, are not considered for FI Concession purposes. The student must have written and
failed the modules in the last examination and the examinations must have been the first examination opportunity. Note
that not all modules are considered for FI Concession purposes. Since the university grants the FI Concession opportunity
based on the requirements met by the student, you are not able to apply to the university to be considered for such an
assessment opportunity. No student will be granted a third opportunity in respect of the FI Concession. The university
reserves the right to award or decline the special assessment opportunity based on the student’s formative and last
summative assessment. Postgraduate students (who qualify) must owe 24 credits or less in order to be considered for
the above assistance. This opportunity is granted at the sole discretion of the University. Students cannot apply for this
opportunity.
 
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deweyzeph

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The irony is that a lot of these struggling students are so useless that they will fail their exams even if you gave them the answer sheet.
 

Rocket-Boy

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Probably someone who works with Bubsy.

Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout

Where do they hide the like button on this forum?!?!1 Checkitout Checkitout Checkitout.
 

zippy

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Open book exams aren't necessarily as easy as it sounds. When you do a masters or doctorate, its also "open-book" at home and in your time, with constraints, obviously. Not saying an exam is the same thing as a masters or doctorate. If they are going ask stupid questions, like what is the chemical formula for water, then yes, that's a problem.
 

ActivateD

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*cough* I am going to outsource my test to someone smarter than me. *cough*
 

MielieSpoor

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Yeah. Colleague of mine was busy with his honours in Information Science at the University of Pretoria last year and also had 24 hours to complete an open-book assessment, at home.
Hmmm, I don't know where you work, but that sounds a bit too familiar...

I had to do an open book last year to complete my honours. That was one of the more difficult exams I have had ever done! Yes I had 24 hours to complete, but give the task at had, that wasn't a lot of time. Also, that wasn't a case of go find the answer. In fact, I didn't really reference my textbooks for answers, only for context and maybe to quote the authors on one or two points - if at all.

I remember UP also having special assessment opportunities for students who only need 1 or 2 modules left to complete their degrees, so that they don't have to re-do a whole year.

That's the way that Havenga guy explained it this morning. You couldn't just do this whenever you want - it was for students at the end of their degree, to give them the chance to finish.

I assume all students in that position have the opportunity.
Kanseliers exam. The department heads and the faculty heads needs to approve though. You don't simply get the exam because you failed a module in you final year. Some students don't get this privilege! Some have to come back and repeat one single module. Also, these exams are all written over two days. So, if you have to write two, chances that it will be on the same day is good. If they clash, that is your problem. I know someone that had to write two on one day - one in the morning, one in the afternoon. With about an hour between the two exams - she didn't enjoy that but passed.
 

Swa

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no man.

Degree is already worth ****...
This here. Parroted knowledge is already worthless in the real world. Our whole education system is wrong as it's focused on what you know rather than what you understand. So it tests memory instead of understanding. My criteria is this, if a person can still do a test by looking up facts then it tests their understanding and problem solving skills. If not then it's all knowledge they're going to forget and you might as well wipe your butt with the test paper.
 

Other Pineapple Smurf

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MNG subjects i presume??

that what most of you dont get - these final level modules are based on hours of research and understanding... they are not merely copying facts out of a text book verbatim. So the benefit of having open book is not what you think, yes you will have access to ideas and concepts..but if you are given a case study you will still need to able to apply these..

And no, I did not copy facts verbatim. Ended up redoing my assignment 1 when after I spend 10 hours on it I realised I got it all wrong and then went and spent 50 hours redoing it.

Students who got 80% in assignments failed in the exams getting only 20-25%. Even talk of legal action as nobody is buying the results as marking was not applied correctly and there is evidence that marking protocol has been violated with some papers. There is even a popular theory that the wrong mark reading sheet was used.
 

Other Pineapple Smurf

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This here. Parroted knowledge is already worthless in the real world. Our whole education system is wrong as it's focused on what you know rather than what you understand. So it tests memory instead of understanding. My criteria is this, if a person can still do a test by looking up facts then it tests their understanding and problem solving skills. If not then it's all knowledge they're going to forget and you might as well wipe your butt with the test paper.

None of my third level exams (final year) have done the parrot test on me. Actually, some lecturers make it clear that parrot learning guarantees a fail. I got a B in one exam because I used my own brain and explained my opinion. This was a for a rather heavy theory subject.

In 1st and 2nd level you get parrot learning but thats more because of setting foundations.
 

reactor_sa

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Lol, waste of time, just pretend you got that masters, like every anc member. When they ask for it say unisa lost it. See it in the news every month.
 

Azg

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A normal exam motivates students to learn more than an open book exam at home.
 

AntiGanda

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UNISA is ranked 1417th in the world.

I also hear Taiwan does not recognise it at all.
 

The Voice

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Ranked 1417th as a university? Not bad I would say

And loads of Countries don't recognise Taiwan

Definitely won't recognise Taiwan with a new UNISA degree. Actually, not with a Matric, either. Wow. Our education system really has died...
 

Saba'a

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UCT had an open book final exam at home in I think 2002 or so for a postgraduate certificate/diploma. So not an issue. Problem is if its done on a large scale then yes risk of fraud increases.
 

HavocXphere

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Thats retarded. Open book is fine (for some subjects - as per below)...but at home is just inviting cheating.

The vast majority of my exams were open book actually - despite it being a notoriously difficult course. Beyond a certain difficulty level it no longer matters: For the rule/law driven subject you can't go through the 10k pages of books during the exams anyway and for the understanding driven ones you either understand what you're doing or you don't.

Kanseliers exam. The department heads and the faculty heads needs to approve though. You don't simply get the exam because you failed a module in you final year. Some students don't get this privilege!
Tuks I assume? Its kinda department specific. They let everyone in my department write Chancellors....but it blocks you from acceptance into honours & the professional body doesn't recognise it, so few were interested in chancellors.
 

OrbitalDawn

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Hmmm, I don't know where you work, but that sounds a bit too familiar...

Could be you know him. :p

MielieSpoor said:
I had to do an open book last year to complete my honours. That was one of the more difficult exams I have had ever done! Yes I had 24 hours to complete, but give the task at had, that wasn't a lot of time. Also, that wasn't a case of go find the answer. In fact, I didn't really reference my textbooks for answers, only for context and maybe to quote the authors on one or two points - if at all.

Yup, matches with what others are saying.

MielieSpoor said:
Kanseliers exam. The department heads and the faculty heads needs to approve though. You don't simply get the exam because you failed a module in you final year. Some students don't get this privilege! Some have to come back and repeat one single module. Also, these exams are all written over two days. So, if you have to write two, chances that it will be on the same day is good. If they clash, that is your problem. I know someone that had to write two on one day - one in the morning, one in the afternoon. With about an hour between the two exams - she didn't enjoy that but passed.

Sounds hectic, but yeah, sounds like it's the same sort of setup. Not hundred percent sure, but it sounds like the hysteria is uncalled for.
 
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