US plane scatters engine debris over Denver homes [B777]

WollieVerstege

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I think it would be a different story if the engine broke off.
It would still be capable of completing the journey. Engines are actually designed to fall off in certain situations. The only danger would be if the engine failure led to control surfaces, systems or parts of the plane being damaged. Even then in modern aircraft there are multiple redundancies that would also have to fail.
 

wingnut771

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It would still be capable of completing the journey. Engines are actually designed to fall off in certain situations. The only danger would be if the engine failure led to control surfaces, systems or parts of the plane being damaged. Even then in modern aircraft there are multiple redundancies that would also have to fail.
After watching an air crash investigation where both engines broke off on the right wing causing it to loose hydraulics, stopping the flaps from working while trying the land causing the plane to bank and crashed into a building.
 

genetic

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04v6y7vimri61.jpg
 

garyc

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https://www.flightglobal.com/safety...tained-forward-cowling-missing/142520.article

The 20 February failure of a Boeing 777-200’s Pratt & Whitney PW4077 turbofan was apparently an uncontained failure, with images showing damage similar to a 2018 event.

John Goglia, an aviation safety expert and former National Transportation Safety Board member, says images and video of the failure powerplant reveal the incident to be an “uncontained failure”. Goglia, who has extensive experience studying turbofan failures, sees evidence suggesting the engine’s containment ring – typically made of impact-resistant composite material – did not stop wayward components from exiting the powerplant.

The 2018 failure occurred over the Pacific Ocean, as the 777 was inbound to Honolulu. That jet’s PW4077 also lost its cowling, including its forward cowl, during the failure, and engine components punctured the jet’s fuselage.

The NTSB attributes the 2018 failure to “a full-length fan blade fracture”. Its report notes that P&W did not uncover blade fractures during a 2015 examination due to lack of formal and recurrent training for inspectors.

In December 2020, a Japan Air Lines 777-200 suffered failure of a PW4074, an incident involving loss of a panel and fan-blade damage. That aircraft also landed safely.

Other notable uncontained failures include two CFM International CFM56 events involving Southwest Airlines 737-700s – one in 2018 that killed one passenger, the other in 2016. And in 2017, an Air France Airbus A380’s Engine Alliance GP7200 suffered an uncontained failure over Greenland, investigators determined.
 

ForceFate

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Wasn't there an incident in Cape Town a few years ago where a Condor plane dropped landing gear component?
 

Gordon_R

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Wasn't there an incident in Cape Town a few years ago where a Condor plane dropped landing gear component?

A decade or two ago a Onetime Nationwide aircraft dropped a whole engine on the runway at CT airport:
 

Gordon_R

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A clean engine break is much better than a dead engine on fire busy burning the rest of the wing, modern twin and quad engine planes are designed to be able to fly with a missing engine, just need the pilot to compensate for the mismatched performance.

For many decades commercial passenger aircraft have been certified to fly with a 'missing' engine. Even the two engined DC3 was able to fly (slowly) over the Rocky Mountains in the 1930s on only one engine.
 

gregmcc

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Going to be a interesting insurance claim for the house.

What caused the damage?
A engine fell on my house
Yeah sure. What really happened?
 

Sollie

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A decade or two ago a Onetime Nationwide aircraft dropped a whole engine on the runway at CT airport:
Ah, the one where the SACAA did not know they needed to read part numbers under a UV light leading to false claims of pirate parts. As if Vernon would ever. He was a shyte in other aspects, but his planes were his pride and joy.
 

WollieVerstege

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After watching an air crash investigation where both engines broke off on the right wing causing it to loose hydraulics, stopping the flaps from working while trying the land causing the plane to bank and crashed into a building.
Correct. The engines falling off caused more damage to other systems which ended up being the reason the plane crashed. Not the engines falling off in of itself. Subsequently recommendations were made to make hydraulic systems more robust and to add shut off valves. Planes flying today are much safer due to that accident.
We actually had a 737 lose an engine on take off here in Cape Town a few years back. It still took of and landed without any further incident.
 

Gordon_R

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Several older model B777s grounded. Seems to be a problem history with one engine type:
The agency has ordered extra inspections of Boeing 777 jets fitted with the Pratt & Whitney 4000 engine following the incident.

"We reviewed all available safety data following yesterday's incident," said FAA administrator Steve Dickson in a statement.

"Based on the initial information, we concluded that the inspection interval should be stepped up for the hollow fan blades that are unique to this model of engine, used solely on Boeing 777 airplanes."
The National Transportation Safety Board's initial finding is that most of the damage occurred in the right engine, where two fan blades were fractured and other blades also impacted. The main body of the aeroplane suffered only minor damage.
In Japan, all 777s with the Pratt & Whitney 4000 model engines are to avoid its airspace until further notice. This includes take-offs, landings and flights over the country.

The government there has also ordered JAL and ANA airlines to suspend the use of its 777s with the same Pratt and Whitney 4000 model engine.

Last December a JAL flight was forced to return to Naha Airport due to a malfunction in the left engine - the plane is the same age as the 26-year-old United Airlines plane from Saturday's incident.

In 2018, the right engine of a United Airlines plane broke shortly before it landed in Honolulu. Following an investigation, the National Transportation Safety Board said the incident was caused by a full-length fan blade fracture.
 
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