US warns world not to trust Huawei's 5G networks

Bradley Prior

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US warns world not to trust Huawei's 5G networks

The scores of pages of U.S. indictments handed down Monday against Huawei Technologies Co. don’t explicitly mention anything about 5G networks or China’s spy agency.

But they sent a clear message to world leaders weighing whether to use Huawei equipment for next-generation wireless networks connecting everything from phones to cars to supertankers: China’s largest technology company is a threat to national security. [Bloomberg]
 

Foxhound5366

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Presumably this will be easy to test, right? People reverse-engineer devices and software all the time. You can't hide it if it's there ... so is it, or is this just another Trump scare tactic?
 

genetic

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Presumably this will be easy to test, right? People reverse-engineer devices and software all the time. You can't hide it if it's there ... so is it, or is this just another Trump scare tactic?
You can't just reverse engineer a microchip. It doesn't work that way.
 

Foxhound5366

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You can't just reverse engineer a microchip. It doesn't work that way.
No but you could check the software that the chip is executing, and also see if the device is giving off any signals that aren't accounted for by current activity.
 

Jola

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Fortunately SA doesn't have anything worth spying on, so we can buy the cheapest equipment.

Oh wait ! There are the Blue Light Convoys !!!
 

sajunky

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Fortunately SA doesn't have anything worth spying on, so we can buy the cheapest equipment.

Oh wait ! There are the Blue Light Convoys !!!
Convoys, is a visible sign. Facts:

1. SA is buying the most sophisticated spying equipment in the world, supplied (or advised) by NSA and MOSAD.

2. SA has more than dozen minerals absolutely neccessary for a military which are available only in two countries: Russia and SA. US cannot lose such resources, it is definitely worth to spy.
 

Solarion

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I think it's a fair assessment to consider Cape Town itself a viable military asset. Specifically Gordon's Bay. It is the most defensive location.
 

Solarion

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Presumably this will be easy to test, right? People reverse-engineer devices and software all the time. You can't hide it if it's there ... so is it, or is this just another Trump scare tactic?
It actually doesn't matter at this point. I have to say that the UN needs to be more fair to Russia however Russia needs to reach a compromise with the Ukraine ASAP. This is the most important obstacle at the moment.

Russia did warn the US of gambling with ISIS. This has had a devastating effect on international relations with Russia. The US has broken trust.

 

Jola

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Convoys, is a visible sign. Facts:

1. SA is buying the most sophisticated spying equipment in the world, supplied (or advised) by NSA and MOSAD.

2. SA has more than dozen minerals absolutely neccessary for a military which are available only in two countries: Russia and SA. US cannot lose such resources, it is definitely worth to spy.
1) That is just the ANC trying to spy on everyone else, they need to stop doing that, so if it gets out then it is good.

2) I'm sure that there is nothing secret about those minerals.

The looting by the ANC is the only thing that people (ie the ANC) are trying to hide.
 

eXisor

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You can't jAs forust reverse engineer a microchip. It doesn't work that way.
These links beg to differ...

https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/13472/is-it-possible-to-reverse-engineer-a-chip-design

https://hackaday.com/2017/05/02/how-to-reverse-engineer-a-chip/

and google has many, many more, most with vids showing how.

So yes, one can reverse engineer a microchip.

The backdrop to all this is the USA's fear that China is racing ahead of them technologically. It's both a scare tactic, and a negotiation strategy. If there was some spy chip in todays tech it would have been found and used as evidence of what the US claims. Since they haven't produced said spy-chip....

The US is finally realising their standard of living is unsustainable, that their workforce is too expensive, and China will be by far the largest superpower by 2050. It's all just delaying the inevitable since they won't get their people to accept the drastic standard of living drop it'd take to match China in the long term.

Musk recognises this, hence he's focusing on opening a factory in China this year to lower the costs of building Model 3 Tesla's. The big squeeze is on, and despite what Trump thinks, in the long term it is China doing the squeezing.

As for 5g, Africa, Asia, and South America are unlikely to follow the USA's lead on this. So perhaps short-term slowdown for Huawei, but longer term it'll be no more than a blip.
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eXisor

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A chip with no security, yes.

Most chips these days are encrypted.
I've not heard of encrypted chips. I have heard of chips encrypting/decrypting data as part of their function, but that does not mean they will be protected from reverse engineering. Links please.
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eXisor

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Microchips have had copy protection since at least the 80's.

I don't think we're talking about the same thing. A microchip performs functions, hardwired into the chip itself, hence the technique used in reverse engineering, which is to strip away the layers until you can see the circuitry, exposing the functionality.

Many chips can be loaded with firmware that operates the hardwired circuitry. That can be copy protected, but it's not that relevant in this argument since the circuitry exposes the underlying functionality and the firmware can thus be deduced. In any event, that firmware is not encrypted, it's copy protected, which is not the same thing.
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